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    • For those considered a liner, the state you live in might make a difference in color choice.  Our Boy Scout summer camp put a blue liner in the pool.  The last time I was there, air temps were in the high 90's that week, and the water got too hot to allow the boys to swim in the pool.  I never ended up going back to that camp, so I'm not sure if they ever changed it or not.  They never had a problem when it was white tile and concrete.
    • If you can pick a lumber and avoid the staining, you'd be better off.  Repairs are much easier and the finishing process doesn't take nearly as long.  
    • Ash stains well and is generally pretty cheap.  Or just use cherry and skip the stain.  I bet the extra cost in lumber will be offset by the saved labor time.  
    • I am contemplating alternative layouts for the side panels.  I have enough lumber to build them as drawn (option A).  However, Options B and C will allow for 1) better grain and color match and 2) allow me to keep some 9" wide cherry boards in tact. I am glade I drew it because Option C looks weird, but looked good in my head.   
    • I knew someone would say that.  I'm a believer in global warming, and do understand the problem with CO2.  I can't figure out if it's actually worse to burn that little bit of wood, or run the tractor long enough to stir it into the compost pile.  We have some number of tons of horse manure composting all the time.  I could turn it often, and it will compost faster, but I just leave it in a pile for a year or more, and only stir it one time.  It takes longer, but less diesel fuel, and as you might be able to see with the squash plants in the background, it works just as well. We live a little over a mile off the main road here.  I'm sure the diesel recycle truck doesn't get over 4 or 5 miles per gallon, so I expect them just coming back in here to get it would probably be  close to, or worse than, the same carbon footprint.  That doesn't even count the hydraulic fluid that always seems to be leaking from the truck. I've weighed the different options, and I don't think this is any worse, and most likely not as bad, as most other options.
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