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    • X-base "rustic" dining table design help
      You should talk her into a Barnsley Hay Rake Table instead. Tell her it is the real deal. It is the big daddy all the other rustic tables wish they could be. I'd love to build one. Someday I will. Don Weber built one for PWW a while back, and Mike Pekovich built one for FWW. Drool.  
    • good starting polisher/buffer?
      BW, you need a really closed-pore wood to get it looking good with just a polished surface. And it won't last long. Have you considered CA glue as a polishable, yet tough coating? I've used it to make wooden guitar picks and small jewelry items. I like to flood on the thinnest glue I can get, then sand to 2000 grit and buff. It holds uo really well.
    • Shop teacher in SW MI
      Welcome to the party, JD!
    • White pine table
      That is a nice arrangement!
    • X-base "rustic" dining table design help
      Have you also considered that the top of this monstrously-large table MUST be removable? That thing occupies enough space to make it very difficult to move through doors and around corners. Add the total mass of that much lumber, and you guarantee that to make it solid, you would have to build it in place and sell it with the house. Regarding the construction of the X- shaped pedestals, I think that with 4 components intersecting at the same point, at least one of the joints must be 'faux', else there is about a match stick's worth of solid wood holding things together. To me, it appears the vertical member is the real supporting piece. The angled parts that form the X are perhaps attached to the center with very shallow M&T, and to the top & bottom rails with M&T or lag screws. The long stretcher is probably not a real through tenon, but perhaps a shallow M&T with bed bolts to draw it tight. The bolt heads would be concealed by a faux 'tusk' on the outside. The top is attachex to the upper rail of the X with lag screws, tight in the center, slotted at the ends. All this is pure speculatuon, based on what I can see in the picture, but it seems a reasonable way to make it sturdy, but still break down for moving. As for wood species, I vote for alder or ash (I like ash). Walnut would be prohibitively expensive, red oak is just to coarse, white oak is only a little better in this application. Alder give you a bit of open grain like oak, but I hear it is much lighter in weight, and being light colored, may be more flexible with stain. I like the grain of ash, it has closed pores, but with visible growth rings, and is generally lighter in color. Still heavy, though.
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