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    • Most of their lineup looks like the typical Taiwanese rebadging, but their bandsaws are a unique lineup. I have their 20" Italian bandsaw and it's a boss. Build quality is great and I'm a fan of their tool less ceramic guide system. Their 14" modes look pretty sweet too compared to the typical C frame crap everyone produces. 
    • I have the same miter plane he's useing and have done the same thing as Eric mentions.What evers sharp. I bet the guy in the video know he's got lots of sharpness still in his miter plane.Esp if he only used it to trim a few pieces most of the blade will still be keen. Maybe a better word for it was leveling not smoothing.
    • Depending on the width of the board, I would probably use my miter (chop) saw.  The biggest thing is proper set up, you need to make sure your saws detents are actually correct.  This is also true if using a track saw.  The best way to do miters in my opinion is with a hand plane and shooting board. ps. Welcome to the forum
    • I'm chopping up pieces of a GINKGO tree and doing some experiments with it. I don't have any background in wood or furniture making. This is just a fun hobby project for me. I'm trying to make a couple of small coffee tables, each cut out of a single big chunk of wood.   Does any one know anything about preparing this type of wood to make it stable? The tree was cut down about a week ago and was alive. .. It doesn't look like Ginkgo is commonly used for furniture but it is frequently used to make cutting boards. It is soft and well suited for carving I think.   I think I've mostly cut my first table, prior to treating the wood in any way. But I hope to salvage a couple more big pieces of this tree and make a few of these, so I could try different things.   I've heard of kiln drying wood but I don't know how that goes or if pieces this big can even be dried out without cracking. .. I was thinking of just coating this with polyurythane immeadiately and then leaving some spots on the underside uncoated to release moisture. .. I thought I might cut some big holes underneath and leave those untreated. Also thought I might drive a few of these long 10" spikes I have into the underside in a diagonal criss-cross way, for added support, (in addition to the 8" ones straight into the legs in the last photo).   I still need to finish cutting the legs and do some more sanding, but I do plan on keeping this table rough like it is now.   Does this look like a reasonable project for an amateur???? If I am able to make a few more of these should I go about it differently?  
             
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