HoboMonk

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About HoboMonk

  • Rank
    Journeyman Poster
  • Birthday December 13

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Kentucky
  • Woodworking Interests
    APPALACHIAN-ASIAN FUSION - using traditional a blend of Appalachian and Japanese techniques.

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  1. Note: The actual product name is "Formby's Tung Oil Finish", and not "Tung Oil." This product DOES contain Tung Oil, despite the Internet Echoes that say otherwise. Specifically, Formby's Tung Oil Finish is a wiping varnish made with real Tung Oil/Alkyd varnish that has been diluted with solvents to a wiping varnish consistency. Again, this product is NOT a type of Tung Oil, but it IS a Tung Oil Varnish. For absolute proof ask the company that makes it, not Netties that echo non-facts. (I knew Homer Formby and I'm a chemist with experience in the wood finishing products industry.) Blessings.
  2. What brand of Spar Varnish will you be using?
  3. Try the Gorilla brand epoxy. --- very clear --- small size packaging --- easy to find in stores I too only use epoxy in small amounts, mainly for fixing knots and repairing big cracks in wood. Blessings.
  4. Note: Rancid olive oil is okay to use as a lubricant, rust repellent on tools and even on oil stones. Blessings.
  5. Note: Spar Urethane is not the same as real Spar Varnish. Blessings.
  6. That's a common Internet Echo. WRT the Skittles Internet Echo, here's a list of ingredients: SUGAR, CORN SYRUP, HYDROGENATED PALM KERNEL OIL; LESS THAN 2% OF: CITRIC ACID, TAPIOCA DEXTRIN, NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL FLAVORS, MODIFIED CORN STARCH, COLORS (TITANIUM DIOXIDE, YELLOW 5 LAKE, BLUE 1 LAKE, YELLOW 5, BLUE 1, YELLOW 6, RED 40, YELLOW 6 LAKE, RED 40 LAKE), ASCORBIC ACID (VITAMIN C), SODIUM CITRATE, CARNAUBA WAX. GLUTEN-FREE, GELATIN-FREE. Blessings.
  7. Food-grade shellac is food safe. However, wood finishing products are not made from highly purified food-grade shellac. Likewise, safe drinking water is not the same purity as the 98% of water that is undrinkable. Blessings --- from a former Clinical Chemist/Toxicologist and consultant to the wood-finishing industry.
  8. Why would you use alcohol to dilute so-called "poly"?
  9. The "Bleached White" finish is actually a pigmented wash. It's sometimes referred to as a "limed" finish. It's done by using a diluted white paint, especially water-based, and wiping it on and off until you achieve the desired color. Experiment! Blessings.
  10. Why vs How. The "Why" is the Zeroth criteria and is different for everyone. It's the reason we are here. Blessings.
  11. Here's my ordered list of some of the criteria that I use in choosing/using tools. Notice that "Skill" is number one: 1. Skill 2. Design 3. Safety 4. Cost 5. Environmental 6. Productivity 7. Maintenance 8. Space 9. Storage 10. Power Blessings. Bro. Tenzin, OFI
  12. First, a rhetorical question: Is this another "hand tools" versus "power tools" discussion that assumes there are two distinct categories of tools/tool users? Why does this notion persist? Is it the woodworking publications, bloggers and talking heads that echo this theme? In the real world of serious woodworking, there are no barriers between tool types. You use what is convenient, what matches your skills and what is available. I predominately use Japanese and other Asian handtools, but I love my electric drills and jig saws. I can see a band saw in my future and if I buy one I doubt that it will cause a rift in the space/time continuum. I still drill the occasional hole with a Japanese gimlet or a Western-style brace and bit just because I have the acquired skills to do so and it keeps me in touch with working close to the grain. Also, I have decades of experience using a coping saw, so I don't automatically reach for a jig saw when it is not convenient. I typically have others prep my lumber, using their power tools and their acquired skills. That's simple delegation - a real world choice. My sawyer uses an industrial size power plane to dress my lumber according to my specifications. I don't see the value in spending hundreds/thousands of dollars to buy tools to do simple tasks. However, I occasionally harvest my own wood, then rive and adze it to give it that rustic look that you can't buy. I apologise to no one and I completely reject being labeled as hand-tool or power-tool user - I'm a tool user! I admit to being biased toward my family's seven generation experience in the wood working industry and my decades of training and experience in Asian woodworking. My clients don't care to label me nor do they seem to be aware of the aforementioned tool-based labeling "echo" that pervades forums like this. Acquire skills, not tools. Blessings, Bro. Tenzin
  13. I've had good experiences using Iwasaki Floats on my Japanese plane wood bodies. http://www.leevalley...096&cat=1,42524
  14. Awwwwwwwwwww, The great rancid myth.
  15. Know-say vs. Hearsay: Simple shellac will seal the driftwood. I use Zinsser SealCoat, a two cut of dewaxed shellac. I also use a solution of tung oil, spar varnish and VM&P naphtha to soak some driftwood. It seals and finishes. Yesterday we collected an SUV full of driftwood along the banks of the Ohio River in Warsaw and Carrollton Kentucky. Although the fresh water driftwood doesn't have an absorbed salt problem, there are problems with various river pollutants, including mini-oil slicks that coat the wood. I try to avoid pithy wood and only select pieces that are solid. Blessings.