bbarry9999

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About bbarry9999

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  • Woodworking Interests
    Hobby, furniture, crafts

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  1. Hello all. My shop is in my unfinished basement and I'd like to to use the vertical space (block walls) to mount some ply or peg boards to store clamps, hand tools etc..... nothing too heavy. I know I can screw furring strips to the wall and mount the sheets to them. However my basement has been bone dry for 19 years and I'm hesitant to drill into the floor or walls. Any suggestions on ways to use my wall space? I've considered bolting 2x4s to the overhead joist, hanging them vertically, and screwing plywood to that. Thanks for help Bill
  2. I make AWESOME sawdust
  3. Can you clarify? When talking face grain or edge grain are you referring to exposed or glued sides? I.e.: is face grain, glued on the face grain or is the face grain the surface of the board? Thanks
  4. I'm not sure of the final design yet but expect it will be in the 18" x 48" range. Perhaps a little deeper. Thanks for the responses. Keep them coming, Bill
  5. It looks like my next project will be buffet table with a granite top for my wife. I'm still in the design phase - getting concepts from my wife. The big question I see right from the start is what is the best way to attach the top? I originally thought an adhesive to the frame work, I now wonder if a solid or plywood top beneath the granite would be better? Any ideas or tips as I start on the project? Any concerns about need extra supports for the weight of the top? thanks Bill
  6. I'm fairly new to woodworking, and bought my 1st WR plane last year and taught myself how to flatten, sharpen and use it. While I can't offer insight on how they compare, I can say I've been very happy with quality and ease of use.
  7. Do you tend to sharpen your power planer blades or just dispose of them? If sharpen, do you do it yourself or send them out to a professional? At $50 they are a bit pricey, but the do last a long time and my not be worth sending out. as always.... Thanks for the help. Bill
  8. Thanks for all the great feedback (I started this thread). As with many things in wood working, there is more than one way to achieve most tasks. I think what I learned here is * The jointer will give the better edge * Jointing both both sides is ok when done properly * A table saw can give a clean glue worthy cut - if the TS is setup correctly * My less than perfect TS cuts are more a result of my limited (but growing) skill set, and probably a TS setup that could use some tweaking. Thanks again. This forum is an awesome source of information. Bill
  9. Do I understand you correctly? Your process is joint to get a straight edge, rip the board a little large and then joint the saw cut edge? Does that keep things parallel enough? How do you dial in the final thickness on the jointer? Just sneak up on it? thanks for all the feedback.
  10. I recently got a jointer, and now fully appreciate what a really flat edge means and looks like. My question is what is the reccomended type of TS blade for ripping boards (with one edge jointed to the appropriate width, with a clean strsight edge? How many teeth, carbide? Etc.... THANKS BB
  11. Best Quote of the year: "Drive" the blade around the curve as if it were a car (and not one from 'Tokyo Drift'. Makes a great visual aid.
  12. Just curious. In this day of the internet and You Tube, does anybody subscribe to wood working Magazines and if so what are your favorites? What do get from them (ideas, tips, etc...) and what do you do with them, (keep or trash them)? As a realitvly new hobbyist I subscribe to Wood Magazine and enjoy flipping through each edition for ideas and inspiration. I tend to hold on to my copies as reference, but I realized I don't ever go back to them, I tend to go online instead - which prompted me to start this thread. BB
  13. Hello all. I just completed my Christmas build of two end tables for my wife - delivered the stained product on Christmas and then applied 4 coats of arm r seal after the holiday. My question is how long should the final coat be allowed to cure before the table can be used. thanks for the help BB
  14. Just curious if anybody has a regular PM, Cleaning Schedule for their shop. I just finished my Christmas projects and thought this would be a good time to do a deep cleaning. While doing this I realized I really should have done more along the way. My issue isn't so much the clutter as as it is just the cleaning, dusting, wiping down equipment etc... Thanks Merry Christmas and Happy New Year BB
  15. Hello all I've been woodworking for a couple of years (mainly as a winter hobby) and doing small beginner projects. I have to admit I haven't taken great care of my blades and bits, and as they "wear out" I just bought new ones - generally from the big box store, and in the case of Table saw blades I've migrated to their version of higher end blades to get a longer life. This year my builds are progressing and getting more complicated and I'm stretching to build/test my skills and learn new techniques. I recently purchased a bottle of Trend spray on tool and bit cleaner from woodwerks ((I live within a couple of miles of both a Woodcrafters and Woodwerks store). WOW, what a difference. My blades are like new. I now have a stack of clean blades (formally paper weights) that cut fantastic. The same for my router and drill bits. I guess I always knew I should clean the blades, but wasn't convinced how much of an impact it would have. What at do you use to clean your blades? I'm really happy with the trend cleaner but curious what others are using. Also what type/brand of blades do you recommend for a fairly new but progressing wood worker. For all you other newbies out there - clean your blades. You won't regret it! BB