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Sharpening a router plane blade


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#1 franklin pug

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 04:21 PM

Anyone know of a good video of this? I looked around the usual spots, but nothing was really good.

#2 Torch02

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 05:03 PM

The key is to think backwards. Polish the bottom, remove the burr from the bevel.



#3 john@verona

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 12:01 AM

The Chris Schwarz video is very helpful.

 

John


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#4 Graham Haydon

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 12:32 AM

John,

 

Great link. I have recently purchased a Record router plane that will need a tune up. That video is the perfect how to  :)



#5 TerryMcK

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 05:06 AM

The key is to think backwards. Polish the bottom, remove the burr from the bevel.

+1 on that. That's how I do the blades on my Stanley 71



#6 CessnaPilotBarry

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 06:06 AM

Don't forget to check, and if necessary, set it up, for cutting a flat bottom.

 

Place two identically thicknessed or ripped blocks on opposite sides of your fine stone.  Place the plane on the blocks and lower the iron so it just touches.the stone.  Move it back and forth to create a small bevel.  If the bevel isn't rectangular, regrind, sand, or file the face of the iron to the back edge of the bevel.

 

Now you can polish the bottom and remove the wire edge from the face.  You only need to check each iron once.


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#7 derekcohen

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 07:31 AM

I can offer a step up from Chris' description. The method he uses is a traditional one. The feature that makes the task more difficult is that the bevel is flat, and this means that there is the maximum amount of steel to remove before you achieve a wire edge at the back of the blade.

 

I use a round grinding stone on a Dremel to create a slight hollow grind on the bevel face. Now there is far less steel to remove, and honing proceeds rapidly. You are also more likely to create a sharp edge.

 

Regards from Perth

 

Derek


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#8 franklin pug

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 03:37 PM

The veritas router plane comes with a jig for sharpening help. Looks like it can be placed right in the mkII. Anyone have experience with this setup?

http://www.leevalley...ns.aspx?p=52759

#9 CessnaPilotBarry

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 07:09 AM

The veritas router plane comes with a jig for sharpening help. Looks like it can be placed right in the mkII. Anyone have experience with this setup?

http://www.leevalley...ns.aspx?p=52759

 

 

It works OK for the blades it accepts.   Many router plane irons are one piece, and "L" shaped.



#10 derekcohen

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 07:38 AM

The veritas router plane comes with a jig for sharpening help. Looks like it can be placed right in the mkII. Anyone have experience with this setup?

http://www.leevalley...ns.aspx?p=52759

 

 

 

 

Note that it is only the 1/2" blade that is removable.

 

Regards from Perth

 

Derek



#11 nateswoodworks

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 09:10 AM

Yep I have it too and it does work fine in the MKII but also helps if you sharpen free hand as it gives you something to hold on to. The other way I sharpen the regular L-style is I milled a block of wood to the thickness so the bevel of the cutter sits flat on the stone and the tip of the shank of the cutter rests on the top of my sharpening station. This gives some support for when you slide the cutter back and forth on the stone and helps you keep the bevel perfectly flat (on the narrow cutters there is a tendency for it to twist a bit and hone one side unevenly). The nice thing about this is that after you get the bevel perfect just add a few pieces of paper under the block of wood, this tips the cutter just a tad allowing you to give it a secondary bevel. Now each time you need to hone the cutter you just have to polish the secondary instead of the whole bevel, until of corse your secondary bevel gets too large but then your just go back to the block without the paper shimming it up.

#12 Jim Harvey

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 03:09 PM

I have a Stanley 71 and hone both the flat and the bevel. It's fairly easy to do the bevel if you put the stone right at the edge of your bench.  I hollow ground the bevels first with a small sanding drum in a drill press.


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#13 derekcohen

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 06:23 AM

Use a Dremel with a sanding wheel to create a slight hollow on the face of the primary bevel. Now hone the blade at the side edge of a waterstone. This is quicker, and easier, to get the blade really sharp.

 

Routerironhoning1jpg.jpg

 

 

Blade with hollow grind  ..

 

A4.jpg

 

Regards from Perth

 

Derek


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#14 TheFatBaron

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 11:43 AM

Bumping an old thread with a related question...

 

How sharp do you get your router plane irons? I sharpen my other planes, spokeshaves and chisels on water stones (1000/4000/8000) until they're sharp enough to shave/pare end grain with. But my new old #71, which arrived yesterday, has been run through the sharpening cycle 3 times, and still seems dull. I've only tested it doing some cross-grain rabbets in a fir 2x4, but it's definitely not cutting as well as a chisel of the same width. Is that just how the tool works? Or should I give it another go or three?

 

The blade arrived completely dull, and the bevel was completely rounded over. I'm very tempted to just say screw it and buy a replacement blade from LN/Veritas.

 

Thoughts?



#15 TripleH (hhh)

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 12:25 PM

==> There's a good video on router plane blades, sharpening, etc. It's on Lie-Nielsen's YouTube channel...



#16 Graham Haydon

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 01:14 PM

I had similar issues with my Record router plane. I bought it back to life by holding it on the side of the Tormek with light pressure creating a flat bevel that registered well. On the underside it had been dubbed and getting it out was taking an age. So I very slightly hollowed this edge on the Tormek wheel which meant I could get the flat behind the bevel established again.



#17 Graham Haydon

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 01:15 PM

I have a Stanley 71 and hone both the flat and the bevel. It's fairly easy to do the bevel if you put the stone right at the edge of your bench.  I hollow ground the bevels first with a small sanding drum in a drill press.

+1 one to this, same results.



#18 TheFatBaron

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 01:15 PM

Yeah. I've seen that and Schwarz's video as well. It's not an issue of technique, but more what sort of results I should be expecting, and If I should expect the plane to be as sharp.

#19 Graham Haydon

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 01:17 PM

It needs to be sharp but it's normally finishing the bottom of housings which wont be seen so setting it up like a crazy sharp smoother may not be worth the time.



#20 Southwood

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 02:21 PM

I just used mine yesterday. I picked it up from a flea market and it needs help in sharpness. I cut a dado in hard maple and used it to remove the high spots. Worked just fine a little dull. Dull in comparison to a sharp chisel or plane iron. 







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