Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
NYHump

Wetzler Clamps

4 posts in this topic

Hi All, Not sure if I'm in the correct place but I'm sure someone will let me know. Here's my question, I just came across a bunch of Wetzler clamps and I bought them. There are 33 clamps total from 212s to 718s They are good shape, some rust and some glue, but the handles are great! no cracks and the red is still red. I plan on using them in my shop (garage) and wanted to know, should I take these down and get them sand blasted and then paint them, kind of restore them to original or would they lose value. Yes, I'm a tool junkie! I know these clamps are worth money to some out there, but I am going to use them and who ever gets them when my feet don't hit the ground anymore to be able to get some money for them. Thanks nyhump

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Clean them up to improve the function. If you are obsessed fully restore a couple of them, but otherwise they are still only valuable as functioning clamps. I have a bunch of Jorgenson I beam clamps but I would not waste any time repainting them orange, but they aren't for sale either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you believe that 1 of these just sold on Ebay for over $100 bucks! It was a 312

http://www.ebay.com/itm/VINTAGE-WETZLER-312-STEEL-CLAMP-WOOD-HANDLE-LONG-ISLAND-CITY-N-Y-NICE-OLD-TOOL-/380599230210?_trksid=p2047675.l2557&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEWAX%3AIT&nma=true&si=tWKzASb5BswHpHb2F79B5jMmQaA%253D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc#ht_25wt_1399

I love these clamps, I got my dads when he passed and use them all the time. Now I have a nice collection of them and looking foward to using them. They are off to the sand balster to get cleaned up and ready to use.

NY Hump

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Hi Terry, Thanks for the suggestion I've put some on order now! I was planning on two coats of the Ronseal (want to avoid having to re-finish it in the future!) Regards    
    • If you will be in this house for a year or two, then moving back to the US, I would say stick with hand tools, excepting perhaps a thickness planer to help with milling. It could be Euro-style powered, and stay behind when you leave, but will save you a LOT of boring work.
    • Sales photos (ripped from Google)  for the visual that address the last comment. The double Wye/Tee combo goes by different names with different suppliers and has a couple of profiles from large radius sweeps to three piece 45° "kinks." Either way, you can see the vent rising above the level where waste should be falling. This assumes you have not clogged the line. 
    • My suggestion would be to go with option number one. Build on the skills you have, start with a few small projects, research your tools. Read & learn about tools that will best suit your budget & room availability. Purchase tools as you need them, preferably not as you want them. You'll keep more money in the bank. And, if you make frequent moves, why buy large tools, & have to sell them to move again, or whatever the situation. You can learn & do just as much with hand tools as you can with power tools, just not as fast. For me, learning with hand tools taught me to do more quality work before I started buying power tools. I read ALOT of books on tools, their use & purposes, maintenance. Wood, jigs, whatever I could get my hands on to read to learn. You'll be a better woodworker for the time spent. JMO.
    • Mr. Coop, I'd like to be able to say I started out with woodworking classes in high school, & kept going from there, but I didn't. I grew up in the trucking business, & that's all I know well. Trucking is all I've ever done, that's why I read books to learn the tools, wood, how to, & all I could learn. There weren't the u tube & all when I started, & if there was, I wasn't aware of it. Like ALOT of fellers here, I'm self taught. I don't proclaim to be an expert by any means. I probably make more mistakes than anybody, but, with experience, time, & patience, I've learned to fix my mistakes. But, I also would like to think I do honest, quality work. For no bigger than our little farm community is, I've managed to build a customer base, & keep it. I'm pretty technologically illiterate, so I gave up trying to download pictures to the sites I'm involved with. My granddaughter set me up a FB page under Sawdust Haven. If you'd care to have a look see at my work, be my guest. And thanks for your comment, because I was trying to make a point with honesty, not dollar bills.
  • Popular Contributors

  • Who's Chatting

    There are no users currently in the chat room