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duckkisser

mobile base for lathe on stand

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i have a 42" long 20" wide dresser that i use for a lathe stand.  i need to put a mobile base on it so i can roll it out of  the garage into drive way on a daily bases.  i was thinking that this would be the best style of mobile base so i can just put wheels and mount them to each corner.  but the thing says 36x36 max with 3/4 ply since im not attaching them to a piece of ply wood first can i just screw them to the 4 corners fof the dressor and it will do what i want? or will it not work?

 

 http://www.grizzly.com/products/Universal-Mobile-Base/D3757

 

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there is so much vibration that i think casters might be a problem so i think thye need to move up and machine rest on the ground.

 

might just build my own.

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Build. Looks like shop scrap and a couple basic casters. Can do that way cheaper than the $44 for the eBay stand shipped.

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ok so i built wheels on one side and i cant even budge it.  my cam lever just does not have enough give to lift it up. i have to lift it just soo get enough leverage to pull my cam lever up.  im thinking ill just have to buy the grizzly unit. 

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Try removing your cam, rotating the outer face in and then raise the device by stepping down on your lever. Better leverage action this way.

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i did tried kicking it and nothing i think its just too much weight on the wheels and the cam if i get the grizzly base i can mount it to the 4 corners of my dressor.  that im using for my tool base. figure out that all my stuff weights around 277 LB

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I am sure you have solved this problem already but another thread got me thinking a week or two ago and I just now thought to look for this thread. The post in the other thread used permanently set casters and then lowered feet mechanically to stop movement. The poster used trailer jacks so that he had relatively easy leveling capability on an uneasy surface. This style arrangement seems far less complicated than levered casters to engineer in a home shop.

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Yup thats Me , my workbench is 8' x 4" on casters with trailer jacks to hold it in place, also handy if you need a level surfase wherever you park it. When I did this  I was actually doing some epoxy resin pours on some table tops and needed to have the bench level, 

 

http://www.harborfreight.com/2000-lb-a-frame-trailer-jack-92626.html

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