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Stanley 78 style plane

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Posted · Report post

I recently bought a Stanley 78 style plane. It looks to be clean and complete with most of the original finish. The blade is

dull, and in need of sharpening. Do I sharpen it at 25 degrees? Is there any tricks to sharpening this style of plane blade?

Thanks

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Posted · Report post

I do not have definitive knowledge but images show a bevel down on an approximate 45 degree reciever. Logically 25 should be just fine.

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Posted · Report post

Mike, like C says it's a typical blade presentation angle. I would say a grind angle of 25 and a hone of 30, but hey, whatever works.

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Posted · Report post

I use the Record equivalent of that plane a lot.  Does it have the nicker?  Those are usually missing, and not easy to find.  A nicker is an important thing to have.  Does anyone know of a replacement available?  I've had several people ask me, but I don't know of a source.

 

http://www.historic-house-restoration.com/images/novdec2012_015.JPG

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Posted · Report post

Tom, loocking at Mel's photo I think the Record is an almost a like for like Stanley clone (like most Record planes). Have you tried a Stanley nicker? Also Clifton make this Rolls Royce version but it looks just like a pimped Record/Stanley. Anant also have a version. Perhaps their parts might interchange?

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Thanks.  I have the nicker that came with mine when I bought it new in the late '70s.  I'll bet I've had ten people ask me where they could get a replacement nicker.  I haven't seen a source for a Stanley nicker.  The nicker for the 78/778 rabbet plane is a little narrow thing, and not interchangeable with the nicker for a combination plane.

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Posted · Report post

Totally agree with the 25° to 30° honing angle. It is bevel down so you could go even higher if you want.

 

I have the Record 778, but I think the spurs/nickers are exactly the same - a three pronged affair. I'm still trying to sharpen it properly though.

 

I use the Record equivalent of that plane a lot.  Does it have the nicker?  Those are usually missing, and not easy to find.  A nicker is an important thing to have.  Does anyone know of a replacement available?  I've had several people ask me, but I don't know of a source.

 

http://www.historic-house-restoration.com/images/novdec2012_015.JPG

 

Well, Stanley do still make them, and they still sell a spur set. Part number 12-715. Haven't bought a set though, I'm just assuming the web site isn't lying.

 

This thread has some interesting tips on using the 78/778, the shavings and the rebate certainly look good!

 

John

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Thanks for that.  I read the old forum link too.  I guess I was lucky with the Record 778 that I bought.  I've never sharpened the iron any way but straight across, and it works fine, every time.  I think the important part is that no part of the side of the iron protrudes beyond the body side of the plane. Also, I've never needed to shim the nicker.  It worked fine right out of the box, and has continued to.  I do store stuff carefully so it doesn't rust as you can see.  I don't care about being able to look at a tool until I get ready to use it. 

 

I use mine a lot when I'm making a short, or one single piece of molding to match something else.  It's quicker for me to hog off most of the material with the rabbet plane, than being careful in setting up the tablesaw to cut the rabbets before moving to the hollows and rounds. 

 

In the picture I linked to above, with the 778 in it, that's a wainscoting cap to replace about 7 feet that was missing in an 1828 house.  I had cut the rabbets with the 778 on each side, started to cut the bead with a 55, but the 55 was not cutting well ( in either direction) as you can see by the chunks missing, so I finished the bead with hollows rather than taking time to sharpen the 55 cutter.

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Thanks for all of the feedback. Yes, it did come with a nicker, but i did not realizise that it might need

to be sharpened. I will try the 25 degree angle with a micro bevel on the plane blade.

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