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Nick2cd

Table saw top rejuvenation?

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I have a sawstop with which I'm completely in love.  Or at least as much as you can love a power tool.  anyways, like many of us here, I'm coming off of Christmas projects and the mad dash to finish projects.  Now that Christmas is over, there's a little time to breathe.  My cast iron top is looking rough.  it has some surface rust and even some scratches.  what's the best way to get it back to "like new" condition?  i don't mind seeing some of the scratches, but i don't want to feel them.  i generally coat regularly with johnson's paste wax.  but i want to do a deep clean and "lightly resurface" the top.  what's the best way to go about doing this?  bar keepers friend?  naval jelly?  wet sand with high grit wet dry paper?  

 

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Depends on what kit is available to you...

 

Some folks go at it with an RoS... Personally, I don't buy-into-that...

 

 

My Process:

 

Lapping plate (8"x8") and lapping paste (60micron) -- just about the best way to knock-down the scratch ridges without risk of dishing...

 

Once you've got the ridges under control, I use Simichrom Metal Polish applied with a buffer. This will remove most (and maybe all) stains and leave an even matte-finish. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000DZM7FS/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_2?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A38WFKVAMEYW7E . As a side note, while not a well-known product, Simichrom is generally considered one of the finest general purpose metal polishes available.

 

Final step is Renissance Wax applied with a buffer... http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0012S1XBO/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_3?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A1B7M9EQGNCLQA

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For the surface rust just a little bit of mineral spirits, green scuff pad and some elbow grease will make it shine.

Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk

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I have used WD40 to clean off the top surface rust from jointer beds, band saw, & table saw. After spraying on the WD40 use a scotch brite pad and the rust comes off pretty good. I would knock down the scratches that catch with sand paper on a block.

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Pretend they are not there problem solved. If you resurface your saw every time you get a little scratch eventually you will be buying a new saw.

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My grizzly top looks like crap, im over it, after all its grizzly haha.

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Pretend they are not there problem solved. If you resurface your saw every time you get a little scratch eventually you will be buying a new saw.

I like this idea the best. Guess I'm finished!

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If a scratch has edges raised up that you can feel sand them down . Scrub with a scotch Brite pad, seal with wax or whatever....

But if you can't feel an edge on a scratch buff off the rust and seal/ wax etc.

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