Dan S

opinions on marking gauge types

   27 members have voted

  1. 1. What type of marking gauge do you think works best?

    • Pin
      0
    • wheel
      14
    • knife
      13

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17 posts in this topic

I'm looking into either making or buying a marking gauge, and I'd like to hear what type people think works best.

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I said knife but I use a pin type however it doesn't work as well as I would like.

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I started with a scratch type and have switched to a wheel. LOVE it!

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Wheel's the deal. Knife second. If you make one, order replacement wheels from Lee-Valley (Veritas); the bevel of the wheel is what you need.

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I just went the cheap route put an edge on a washer and screwed it to the end of a dowel use a piece of aluminum with a lock screw to hold it at depth i need, so i guess mine would be a wheel type lol :lol:

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I've used the wheel type marking gauges for a while, and they work great on hardwoods. On softer woods they tend to crush the fibers. So I started to use a knife style gauge on softwoods. After using the knife style for a while now, I now prefer the knife style over the wheel.

Mike

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I prefer the knife type gauge. Pins tend to tear-out the grain and rollers crush the wood fibers in softer woods. If your knife bevel is facing the fence, it helps to keep your fence tight against the material.

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I keep my wheel sharp. 'haven't had a problem with it crushing fibers.

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I have all three and they all have their purposes. If you are just starting out the one with the easiest learning curve and probably most general set of uses would be the wheel type. Grab the Veritas or Tite-Mark and run with it, you'll be happy.

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You will not be disappointed with the tite-mark. Pricey yes, but can you put a price on accurate marks? Definately worth the investment.

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I have and still use all three types the pin marking guage is good for certain things like my mortice guage. I use the cutting (knife) guage for a lot more than I realized until recently, but I have to say the Veritas fine adjusting wheel guage is definitely my favourite. Remember it is not supposed to revolve, and if kept sharp will not crush even the softest wood. Mind you I almost never use soft woods.

Pete

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I was thinking a spear point knife would be the best of both worlds, as you could start in an exact location with the tip (like a pin), and then role more on the side for a slicing action (like a wheel). Does anyone sell knife blades? It seems to me the hardest part would be making the actual blade, because it's so small.

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I'm a wheel gauge fan too. I like my tite mark because it has the micro adjust thumb wheel. LV now has one that does the same thing. Regarding knifes, I have used a single point and a spear point. I like the spear point much better cause I can switch hands and mark quickly at any angle.

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If you make your own guage you could use xacto brand hobby knife blades. Pretty sure they make a spear point blade and when it gets dull just throw it away.

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Wheel gauges are nice - I have two - but I find that a knife gauge makes a deeper cut which is easier to see especially when planing to thickness. It also provides more registration for a chisel, etc. I guess my choice is dependant on how deep I want the line to be. I find the wheel gauges a little bit easier to use. When I use th knife gauge for a deep mark, I usually want to clamp the workpiece to the bench.

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Here is my vote, I have a pin one and yesterday I ordered a Tite Mark ... along with my Lie-Nielsen dovetail saw! yabadabadoooooooo :D

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