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OSB vs. Sheetrock


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#1 sdkidaho

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Posted 09 November 2010 - 01:46 PM

I'm trying to decide on what to use in my shop for walls and ceiling: OSB or Sheetrock.

I haven't priced out either but I'm guessing they will be similar in cost. My thought on using the OSB was that it would be more durable, less likely to get banged up and the fact that you can hang anything anywhere without worrying about anchors or finding a stud.

I'm sure I'm missing something so that's why I'm posting. Are there any downsides to using OSB instead of sheetrock?


Thanks,
Darby

#2 Beechwood Chip

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Posted 09 November 2010 - 02:18 PM

I think sheet rock is a fire deterrent, and some codes require it for that reason.

#3 jHop

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Posted 09 November 2010 - 02:39 PM

I have a sheet of OSB I've been trying to use for two years. It doesn't work well for templates, I can't get it to keep screws very well (maybe too much weight, but they keep pulling out), and it's still rough to the touch. I did use up most of another sheet as shelving, and it performed admirably at that task for me. But my money would be on the sheetrock for walls. Yes, you still have to mud the joints, and sand, and paint, but the finish will be much more consistent for reflected light off the sheet rock than off the OSB. (assuming two coats of paint only, and nothing to prime/seal the OSB for paint.

If you don't want to go the painting route, then OSB becomes the better option, however, as you are already saying "pfah" to the reflected light issue. (maybe you can see in the dark, or have enough source lights to overcome this issue. I don't know.)

#4 willcon

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Posted 10 November 2010 - 08:15 AM

Price wise, they aren't that far apart (at least where I'm at), but as far as the issue of light reflection and sound insulation, I would go with sheetrock. Sheetrock will absorb more sound vibrations than the OSB (quieter shop), and reflects light much better, as already posted. Unless you plan on hanging your tools on nails, you would have to make some sort of bracket for either, and with SR, you would just have to put a ledger up that spans 16".

#5 sdkidaho

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Posted 10 November 2010 - 08:16 AM

No, lighting is definitely a concern and I had intended to paint the OSB, but those are good points to consider. I'm not sure on what code is as far as using OSB vs sheetrock - my building has already been inspected and passed off as far as the structure and electrical goes.

I'm not opposed to sheetrock, I was just of the mindset that the OSB would handle bumps and dings better, but lighting as you mentioned would be better with sheetrock, even if it wasn't painted (but I would want to paint anyway). So at this point, that's two votes for sheetrock and zero for OSB.

I'll have to check costs - I do think they are similar but I could be way off on that.

#6 SignWave

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Posted 10 November 2010 - 01:41 PM

Even in my shop, I don't find that the drywall gets banged up that much. But even if it does, it's super easy to repair. Also OSB may indeed be a little stronger for holding screws, but not so much that I wouldn't find a stud for anything heavy. To me, drywall looks better, and is easier to work with, and would definitely be my choice.

#7 Paul-Marcel

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Posted 10 November 2010 - 11:50 PM

Add me to sheetrock. I usually put a stick of hardwood on the wall where I want to hang heavy stuff. Kinda convenient and looks better anyway. Most things hang just fine on sheetrock if you get the decent picture hangers or toggle bolts for heavy stuff away from a stud.

I bought a sheet of OSB as a sacrificial substrate for a project. The off-gassing would give me a headache in minutes. I eventually left it on the driveway in the AZ sun for a week to burn that off. Even if you have older OSB, the lighter off-gassing but more boards might just kill you off with the fumes. So if you decide on OSB, could you leave a note for the wife that Paul-Marcel wants first dibs on your jointer? thanks...

#8 Vic

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Posted 11 November 2010 - 05:46 AM

I would go with the sheetrock simply to meet code. If you're unsure, either call your local code office or your insurance company. I would think you would end up not being covered in the event of fire with OSB.

#9 sdkidaho

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Posted 11 November 2010 - 02:07 PM

Sounds like sheetrock is the way to go. Guess I'll go price that out. Did I mention I hate putting up sheetrock?

Note to self: buy jointer for Paul.

Thanks guys - I appreciate the input/guidance.

#10 Guest_Mahoganus_*

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Posted 12 November 2010 - 05:06 AM

Yeah Thanks,, This has been a great topic, I too have decided to go with gypsum board as well. I will have to borrow my buddies Bazooka to aid in applying the tape and mud.


#11 Vic

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Posted 12 November 2010 - 05:49 AM

Yeah Thanks,, This has been a great topic, I too have decided to go with gypsum board as well. I will have to borrow my buddies Bazooka to aid in applying the tape and mud.

Definitely Mahoganus! If you have access to professional tools, use 'em. Well, except stilts, I'd fall and kill myself.

#12 sdkidaho

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Posted 12 November 2010 - 07:15 AM

Wow - that's a slick piece of equipment!

I've never done the mud part of sheetrocking - I've only ever hung it and even that's been quite some time ago. I did a little construction work in my youth as I had some family that does that type of work to make a living. I just remember the panels being heavy and that was when I was young and in shape!

#13 Dyami Plotke

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Posted 12 November 2010 - 03:46 PM

I'll Buck the trend. As an owner installed item, don't sweat code. 3/4" OSB T&G subflooring is cheap & dead flat. It'll make great sheathing. And will hold a screw very well.

I'd then recommend you paint the interior with FireOut TopCoat by GAF and then white paint.

It'll make a solid, fire resistant and damage proof wall.

#14 MARK MASLONKOWSKI

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Posted 23 November 2010 - 03:47 AM

I just finished the lining my shop with 1/2" plywood one side sanded. I am very happy with the results. I plan to just water seal it to keep it natural looking. I could see similar results from OSB.

MARK

#15 Dave B

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Posted 23 November 2010 - 06:16 PM

I used OSB, primed it and painted it with a gloss white. One thing I did do before painting it was fill the cracks with drywall mud. It looks great and has held up beautifully. Here is a picture of the OSB installed with mud over the screws and seams. If I had to do it all over again I would stick with the OSB but paint it on the floor and then hang it.

DSCF1835.JPG

#16 Samantha

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 01:08 PM

If you live in a place that gets terribly cold in the winter and hot in summer like I do, I would go with the sheetrock - the insulation factor is much higher than OSB. My builders are going to mark where each stud is on the sheetrock so I'll always know where they are. Of course I'll have to re-mark after painting, but I still think it's worth the trouble.

#17 jHop

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 01:14 PM

My builders are going to mark where each stud is on the sheetrock so I'll always know where they are. Of course I'll have to re-mark after painting, but I still think it's worth the trouble.


put a hole protector on the floor below the marks, so you can transfer them again. Assuming, of course, that you don't have carpet down yet. (because everybody's shop should be a lounge, right?)

#18 nateswoodworks

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 03:58 PM

I have OSB walls and ceiling tiles on the ceiling(where else) and couldn't be happier. If I move a cabinet on the wall I just take a little colored wood filler and you will never see where it was, no need to patch and paint. The other great thing is no dirty looking walls, between the dust and handprints a bright wall can look dirty pretty quick. I personally prefer the osb but can also see why others prefer the sheetrock.
Nate

#19 Dyami Plotke

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 04:12 PM

If you live in a place that gets terribly cold in the winter and hot in summer like I do, I would go with the sheetrock - the insulation factor is much higher than OSB. My builders are going to mark where each stud is on the sheetrock so I'll always know where they are. Of course I'll have to re-mark after painting, but I still think it's worth the trouble.

Samantha,
while it's true that sheetrock has better insulating values than OSB, that's mostly due to it's air barrier qualities since it is typically spackled and sealed. That said, neither can compare to properly installed and air sealed insulation. I'd advise to let the insulation do the insulating and use the sheathing you feel is best for you sheathing needs.

#20 Ronnie E

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Posted 18 December 2010 - 12:17 PM

I have to go with OSB. I really cant stand sheet rock. For the main reason that when you put a nail in it, it just don't hold..
You may as well put cardboard up with some tape and glue..
There's not to much to putting OSB up. What I am about to tell you may surprise you. But I put up OSB in the living room and kitchen of my home and I am very pleased with it.. And if you ever make a hole in the wall, like with a nail or screw and you don't want it there any more just buy you some white caulking from the,, you know depot. And the best part about it. Its easy to install..
No tape and float....... :D :D :D





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