TylerYates

Ridgid R4512 Table Saw

8 posts in this topic

Ok so i have the newest ridgid table saw R4512 and love it is a big upgrade from my previous which was one of those little small diy saws that have the fence rail built into the table. my question though is i am trying to build a insert plate for it and am having some serious issues. i have searched the net and found that it is possible but not sure which way would be best. the throat plate is 15 1/8 inch x 3 3/4 inch by 1/8 inch. One nice feature is that the lip on the table does not go all the way around but there are 4 screws and 1 fixed magnet i believe that stick out about 1/2 - 3/4 inch and about 1/2 inch wide. Which would be the best way to make a insert plate. should i route all the way around with a straight bit or use a drill press and drill out each one of those 5 lips so i still have a lot of thickness.

Got to figure something out as the saw only has one plate and i will be doing alot of dado cuts and have no dado plate.

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Personally, I'd use a drill press. That's how the commercially available ones (generally speaking) I've seen are made. Well, actually, they are rabbeted all the way around AND drilled for levelling screws.

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I have the Craftsman version. Supposedly Harbor Freight has a plastic cutting board that is exactly the right thickness for an insert but I haven't tried to make one yet. Mine came with a dado insert, you might want to check with Ridgid and make sure you weren't supposed to get one. If not, Sears has em of course.

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Yea already checked and nope no dado insert. I rather make one any way for zero clearance

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You can get the one Sears sells for the 21833, but that one isn't worth buying unless you have no other option. I was forced to buy one because I don't have a router, but as soon as I get a router, I'm making a replacement ZCI. It's an odd size insert, and no one seems to be making them that size. Hopefully that'll change as the Ridgid saw becomes popular.

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I forgot about this topic there is someone who is making them they will fit a grizzly tsaw the craftsman 21833 and the rigid. Lee craft zero clearance is the one making them I believe

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I forgot about this topic there is someone who is making them they will fit a grizzly tsaw the craftsman 21833 and the rigid. Lee craft zero clearance is the one making them I believe

Leecraft makes some nice stiff phenolic inserts. Should work out well if it fits.

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