JosephThomas

We lost a good one

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 thats too bad, I've always wanted to see them.

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Unfortunate for sure.

 

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I seem to remember driving through one of these when I was just a lad on a family vacation to Yosemite.  Long time ago.  It was cool.  Not sure how good it was for the trees, though. 

OK, so here's the question though:  how many board feet?  

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Visited that tree 14 years ago and remember standing there and wondering why it hadn't come down yet at that time considering the fact that they had removed over half of its structural base making the tunnel.

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I've visited that one a few times in my lifetime.. 

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33 minutes ago, Chet K said:

Visited that tree 14 years ago and remember standing there and wondering why it hadn't come down yet at that time considering the fact that they had removed over half of its structural base making the tunnel.

I never got to visit these ones, being a lifelong Midwesterner, I've only been out west a couple times to San Diego. How DO these trees survive? It defies everything I understand about how trees live and grow. 

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56 minutes ago, Isaac Gaetz said:

I never got to visit these ones, being a lifelong Midwesterner, I've only been out west a couple times to San Diego. How DO these trees survive? It defies everything I understand about how trees live and grow. 

The living part of the tree isn't in the middle, that's basically how. They're less structurally sound, sure, but a good portion of the living part of the tree was still keeping the roots connected to the branches.

3 hours ago, treeslayer said:

 thats too bad, I've always wanted to see them.

There are still a few over in the coastal redwoods, apparently, but I think they are on private land.

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How DO these trees survive?

They survive because they are freakin' HUGE. I never understood how big they were until I saw them up close and in person. I read that in the redwood logging heyday, it wasn't unusual to net over a million BF from one tree.

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That was a sequoia darn it I wanted to see that one.

Ive been to the trail of 100 giants and they are big!

Aj

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Read about it this morning having seen it in photos for many years but never visited. A news report said it was estimated to be about 1000 years old.

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@TerryMcK they are worth a flight over if you ever have opportunity. I am very happy to have seen firsthand both Sequoia and Baobab. Loss and death are inevitable. I just hope we are doing the right thing to leave some monsters for a thousand years down the road. 

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Damn shame. I STILL remember going through one over 60 years ago. Well, at least a few redwoods sill have tunnels so maybe future generations are not out of luck. Yet.

 

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3 minutes ago, phinds said:

Well, at least a few redwoods sill have tunnels so maybe future generations are not out of luck. Yet.

Sorry phinds, If I am not mistaken, that was the last Sequoia or Redwood with a tunnel.  I could be wrong.

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The article linked to said there are 3 privately held redwoods still in use. Did you think I was just making that up?

 

"However, there are still three coastal redwoods (taller and more slender than sequoias) with tunnels cut through them. They're all operated by private companies, the Forest Service says, and still allow cars to drive through — one appeared in a recent Geico ad. "

 

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17 minutes ago, Chet K said:

Sorry phinds, If I am not mistaken, that was the last Sequoia or Redwood with a tunnel.  I could be wrong.

I believe it was the last living tunnel tree.

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14 minutes ago, drzaius said:

I believe it was the last living tunnel tree.

Ah. I missed that. I was focusing on the "going through it"

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On 1/10/2017 at 10:28 AM, wdwerker said:

When I was in Redwoods National Park I saw a straight row of trees down the trail and got curious. I hiked over and found a huge tree had blown over and survived. It grew a row of branches straight up out of its side and each one was bigger than any normal tree at home. 

When I visited Oregon as a child with my grandparents we brought home a burl that was growing sprouts straight up bought at a souvenir shop.  It was cool but we didn't manage to keep it alive long.  I'd like to have another one now, I'm sure I could take better care of it. 

 

I'm going to try and go up to the "Trail of 100 Giants" this weekend with my girlfriend, its just up the highway from where I live.  Not sure if we will make it up that far though due to the snow this time of the year.  I'll try and remember to grab some pictures for you guys. 

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