Derek_PNW

Spray Danish Oil with an HVLP?

13 posts in this topic

I am almost finished with my larger workstation / out-feed table and would like to finish it with Danish Oil - Black Walnut. The workstation is made out of 3/4" birch ply. My last steps are to finish the carcass and top of the workstation, trim with a white hardwood (poplar most likely) and build some drawers.

However when it comes to finishing the carcass I am a little overwhelmed with the idea of rubbing it down with Danish Oil. . . Can I spray Danish Oil with my HVLP system? I have searched far and wide and have not found an answer. This makes me believe that this is NOT a good idea. If it is a good idea, great, but if it is not, why is that?

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I suppose you could spray it on, but you'd still have to wipe all the excess off after waiting for it to soak in to the wood. Any wetness left on the surface can take forever to cure & will leave uneven patches.

Be aware that you may not be happy with the way the finish turns out. BB ply doesn't take coloring very evenly.

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I see no gain.  Maybe it would make it easier to get in any nooks and crannies but, how much of that is there.  The work of cleaning the gun would offset any gain as far as I can see.  You have to touch EVERYWHERE to wipe off the excess (and generally more than once) anyway.  I hand finish bedroom sets; its not as bad as you fear ;-)

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It would take a very powerful sprayer to atomize Danish Oil. And then it would turn into a fog that would hang in the air. Very bad idea ! Wipe on, wipe off. Make some finish test boards on the scraps from your project ! Danish Oil especially the colored varieties don't look that good on birch ply or poplar.

Use a dye if you must color the table, then a wiping varnish like General Finishes Arm-r-Seal .

or Try Generals Endurovar water bourne finish if you want to spray .

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The hvlp would be a means to get the Danish Oil onto the wood with one hand and in the other a stain pad loaded with Danish Oil working together as one. The Danish Oil still needs to be worked into the wood with a pad to even things out. On large surface areas I will spray the stain and work with a pad. Simply put, think of the spray gun as a pan filled with stain. Instead of dipping the pad into the stain, you spray the stain to the wood. 

 

Did you test some of the plywood with the oil to see if you like what you see?

 

-Ace-

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I would apply it by hand.  Have a disposable brush handy to work it into corners.

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Don't get me wrong,I've used Danish oil close to 40 years. On small solid wood pieces it's a quick easy finish. On large surfaces and plywood there are so many better choices. And I learned the limitations the hard way, screwing up and having to wait several days for it to dry only to get an unsatisfactory result .  

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Eric, you've got to stop holding your feelings in and tell @Derek_PNW what you really think:lol: ! glad to see you back for a comment or two.  @Derek_PNW listen to Eric and  Steve great advice.

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Thank you all for the input!

I will not spray the oil. I will use one of the alternatives mentioned. It is a workbench so i might just spray the carcass below with a film finish, then leave the top raw.

I just like finishing everything and making it nice even if I will drive several chisels and such into it...

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

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3 minutes ago, Derek_PNW said:

I will not spray the oil. I will use one of the alternatives mentioned. It is a workbench so i might just spray the carcass below with a film finish, then leave the top raw.

A workbench top is one place where an oil finish is a good choice. On my maple top I sanded it with an ROS to 80 grit & then applied 2 coats of Watco Tung Oil (which seems to be an oil/varnish blend). Its fairly grippy so the work doesn't slide around too easily & glue drips pop right off.

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If this is an out feed/assembly area type bench I would consider putting a clear finish as Eric mentioned and then a coat or two of paste wax.  This will keep dried glue from sticking to it.  But remember that dark finish just makes the shop environment dark when you really want it bright for work.

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I used walnut Danish oil on my BB workbench top just because I didn't like the Danish oil for the project I had bought it for.  I wanted to use it up and didn't care what color the bench took.  It's functional enough, glue doesn't stick well...and it's not furniture quality, but it wasn't going to be anyway.  It doesn't look anything like walnut obviously. It's very bronze.  Eventually I'll do the base too, just because I don't know what else to use the stuff for.

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