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rmac

Applying Polyurethane When It's Cold

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Is there any such thing as "too cold" for applying polyurethane? I know that it takes longer to cure when it's cold, but is there any downside other than that? Nothing I can find on the manufacturers' websites (Minwax, General Finishes) talks about this particular issue.

-- Russ

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It should be above 60 for best results. The problem might be flowing and leveling, and you could get dust and junk in the film cause the finish won't skim over. Because the finish won’t flow well, might orange peel or look like fish eye.

-Ace-

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Thanks again, Ace. Here in Phoenix we normally don't have to worry about "too cold", but today we do. And probably tomorrow. And maybe the next day.

-- Russ

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If you're below 45 and its even slightly damp you quite likely to get bloom as well as prolonged drying times. Which gives everything that much better chance of getting scratched or dusty. I'd try getting the temperature up to between 60 and 70.

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It get cold sometimes here in SoCal at least for spraying W/B poly.

What I do is take the can and put in a bucket of hot water.

If Im spraying the just the cup got in the bucket.

Hey it works for me

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