Jerry S

What's your favorite finish for jewelry boxes

8 posts in this topic

I'm working on a jewelry box and am having troubles deciding what finish I should use on it. I is made of curly maple and walnut. So obviously the part I want to "show off" is the curly maple top and drawer fronts. For lack of a better term, what do you think is a "heirloom" finish for a project like this?

The ones I've thought about so far are BLO, GF top coat, Watco Danish Oil, Shellac, and a water based poly.

(If a photo helps inspire or opinion-ate, I'll be working on that next.)

Thanks,

Jerry S

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And some photos. The design is not original, I got it from Wood Magazine, 2005.

P1050725.jpg

P1050726.jpg

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Nice box; I like the curves and contrasting woods.

I'd say Waterlox. I've only used it once, and it was on a jewelry box. I was really impressed with the stuff. Not cheap and it tends to gel in the can once the can gets half full, but very nice. You'll want to brush it on, not wipe. Can use a badger hair or synthetic brush.

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I've had great success with Tried & True Original Finish. I used it on a card box for a wedding made out of bird's eye/curly maple and walnut.

Card_Box_1.jpg

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Ah ha! I knew Mr Waterlox would chime in :) What do you do about the stuff gelling when the amount of air in the can increases? I was leaning towards pouring out the can into a couple jars and leaving very little air at the top although right now my can is only 1 jewelry box away from full...

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What do you do about the stuff gelling when the amount of air in the can increases?

I remember a TWW video, but I can't find it. Maybe it was a Q&A?

As I recall the two popular methods are:

  • Use a product which displaces the oxygen in the container
  • drop marbles or something else relatively inert into the finish so the fluid level is near the lid.

EDIT: I found this "question of the week".

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Ah ha! I knew Mr Waterlox would chime in :) What do you do about the stuff gelling when the amount of air in the can increases? I was leaning towards pouring out the can into a couple jars and leaving very little air at the top although right now my can is only 1 jewelry box away from full...

I bought a gallon of it two years ago and it's still pouring freely. Bloxygen really works.

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