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What do you use to strain paint?


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#1 gardnesd

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 07:16 AM

Perhaps a fruit collander?

#2 AJ Peck

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 07:22 AM

How viscous is the paint? If it's fairly low viscosity, you could use cheesecloth. What size particulates are you looking to filter out?

#3 gardnesd

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 10:13 AM

booger sized. seriously, some chunks of I-dont-know-what, and some sawdust my 3 yo threw in the can. he thought that was cool.

#4 Vic

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 03:56 PM

I usually yell at it under bright lights until it breaks. OH...nevermind. I see this was a different type of straining. :D

#5 Loogie

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 04:53 PM

The paper strainers from the paint store are about as cheap as you can get less than $1/ea. They come in medium and fine meshes. I also use a regular fine kitchen strainer that's about 4" in diameter for water based stuff. I learned my lesson when I used one for solvent based finish and forgot to wash it out. That was the end of that strainer. Here's a set of three for about $10.

#6 flairwoodworks

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 09:01 AM

I use old coffee filters. Everyone seems to like that dark espresso finish these days, so what's the harm?

(Loogie has good advise.)