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Rob Lopez

Question on Durable Kitchen Cabinet Finish

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Hey Peeps....

Yet another kitchen cabinet finish question here....

I am in the process of making some European style kitchen cabinets. My choiceof Door and Drawer face material is Alder. Inexpensive, light and very easy towork with.

The finishing process I had planned to use was a 3 step process...

1. Boiled linseed oil

2. Amber Shellac

3. General Finishes Enduro-Var Water-BasedUrethane

I would appreciate any thoughts if this finish is too much or would simplecoats of some GF semi-gloss be enough. I wanted to tint the wood just a tadwith the Oil, then seal the oil with the shellac while adding a hit of amber toease the light green the oil produces, and then top everything with the Enduro-Var.

The biggest question is will the Enduro-Var hold up to daily use?

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I'm doing some testing now with the GF Enduro Var on Cherry. So far, I have applied it straight to the sample without anything else. It is darkening the wood similar to what BLO will do so you might not need that. Also, I think the instructions say to not apply over another oil but I may not be correct. At any rate, make sure the BLO cures fully before putting anything else on top.

As far as durability, the Enduro is supposed to be superior and should be fine for a kitchen based on what I've read so far.

Good luck.

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I'm doing some testing now with the GF Enduro Var on Cherry. So far, I have applied it straight to the sample without anything else. It is darkening the wood similar to what BLO will do so you might not need that. Also, I think the instructions say to not apply over another oil but I may not be correct. At any rate, make sure the BLO cures fully before putting anything else on top.

As far as durability, the Enduro is supposed to be superior and should be fine for a kitchen based on what I've read so far.

Good luck.

Thanks so much for the input. I just need to answer to a higher power (wife) in this case and seem a little confident.

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Yes, I can understand that! Maybe our wives are in cahoots! My wife wants a nice smooth finish but not too glossy, but I went with the semi-gloss anyway. I figure I can knock it down with wax if I need to.

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