milwen

Mineral Oil vs. Butcher Block Oil

11 posts in this topic

I'm trying to find out if there is any difference between mineral oil (sold as a laxative) and butcher block oil. The reason I ask is because a pint of mineral oil as a laxative can be purchased for $2.63 from Amazon and a pint of General Finishes butcher block oil is $8.99 from Woodcraft.

As far as I can tell both are just plain mineral oil. According to the General Finishes MSDS the butcher block oil also contains a small amount of vitamin E, but I have also seen this listed on some laxatives. Has anybody had any experience with this?

http://www.amazon.com/Cumberland-Swan-Mineral-Oil-Pt/dp/B000QFUQFS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=hpc&qid=1307996820&sr=1-1

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2003233/1773/Butcher-Block-Oil-Pint-Saf.aspx

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From my experience, they are the same exact product (for our purposes). Even if it weren't the same exact product, the standard mineral oil works well enough that its worth buying to save significant money.

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So what did you finish that cutting board with? Oh, a laxative I purchased off Amazon. :blink:

It's all in what you call it. :D

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So, is the vitamin E added to the laxative for people, and they have to list it when it's sold as a wood finish, or is the vitamin E added to the finish for the wood, and they have to list it when it's sold as a laxative?

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I go to one of those 1.00 stores and get my mineral oil for 1.29. Right next door to it is a CVS that charges 4.29.

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Its a marketing hype, where they label it as food grade finish. Same thing as General salad bowl finish. Its just thinned down varnish.

You can buy it cheaper at CVS, any pharmacy stores.

I recommend using mixture of mineral oil and either paraffin or beeswax as a finish for your cutting boards.

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Thanks for the info everybody. I'll try the plain mineral oil and save a few dollars.

So, is the vitamin E added to the laxative for people, and they have to list it when it's sold as a wood finish, or is the vitamin E added to the finish for the wood, and they have to list it when it's sold as a laxative?

I think I saw somewhere that the vitamin E was for stability.

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like everyone else says, butcherblock oil is a $10 bottle of mineral oil

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Vitamin E is added to oils as a natural disinfectant and rancidity retardant.

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I go to one of those 1.00 stores and get my mineral oil for 1.29. Right next door to it is a CVS that charges 4.29.

Thanks for the tip about the dollar store. I will have to look for USP grade mineral oil there.

SQ

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Its a marketing hype, where they label it as food grade finish. Same thing as General salad bowl finish. Its just thinned down varnish.

You can buy it cheaper at CVS, any pharmacy stores.

I recommend using mixture of mineral oil and either paraffin or beeswax as a finish for your cutting boards.

I agree, I make up the USP grade mineral oil and beeswax. It's inexpensive to make and keeps well in a covered container. I use it on boxes, bowls, cutting boards, wooden kitchen utensils, etc. Quick and easy to apply and looks great.

SQ

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