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higtron

Lathe powered thickness sander done

11 posts in this topic

That looks like it works very well. For some reason I was thinking you feed the material from the front side of the lathe. But that would just send it flying out the back. Do you have any issue of control of the workpiece? It is also a lot larger than I was picturing, but I guess that makes sense since you need a large work surface under the drum.

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Thanks Tim it does work great I useually make light passes,but I've tried takeing a couple 1/8 bites and it doesn't seem at all uncontrolable . If I have more than one piece I just use the second piece to push the first one through. The drum is 18 1/4", and can take up to 3'' thick material. Haven't had any flying missiles yet but it feels like just finger pressure holds the piece. It's aiming out the overhead door of my shop I thought about letting one go just for to see how much force it comes out at, but the trogetory of the table worries me, so I'll leave that for Mythbusters.

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im kinda wondering what prompted you to do this was there an actual need for a custom sander or did you just have a poor lathe that you wanted to do this with for the heck of it....also how much did it cost is it realy cost effective to build one instead of buying one. if it was cheap can you give us a quick summary of what parts went into it and what was the hardest part.

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Nice job. Necessity is the mother of invention. You should think about putting up a tutorial on the process you took on making it.

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The table is bolted tight to the bed of the bed rail of the lathe if I really put my wieght out to one end I can get it to flex a little, so I would say it's a very stable base. the adjustable part is conected to the base at the back with a piano hinge which creates a pivot point, and at the front there is an hiegth adjustment bolt that raises and lowers the table. Once all that was built, and my drum was completed I took a piece of particle board that I had kicking around it was very flat, I than glued a 4"x24" 36 grit sanding belt to the particle board turned the lathe on and sanded the drum down until it was parallel to the table, than put the hook and loop sand paper on the drum. So far I've had very good results and the thickness of the stock it produces is very consistent, I've taken the sanding unit off used my lathe as it was intended than put the sanding unit back on, it works great thanks for asking hope this answers your questions. Dave

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