Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
t3e871

Finished 1 of my chairs!

8 posts in this topic

I had a little trouble with the square plugs breaking when inserting and I believe they took me the longest to make. These chairs started at 8/4 cypress with purple heart plugs. I finished with a seal coat of shellac and covered with 2 coats of (50%) thinned epifanes clear.

Thanks for the build Marc - it was very rewarding!

See more of the progress and my cramped garage shop here:

https://picasaweb.go...feat=directlink

post-768-0-47516100-1316440127_thumb.jpg

post-768-0-36542600-1316440357_thumb.jpg

post-768-0-21173800-1316440407_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rob, I recently joined the Guild, and picked the adirondac chair as my 'archive' project. I had figured to depart from the G&G style a bit, since I want to use cypress. Your chair looks so good in cypress, I may just change my mind!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hope he's still a member as the op was in 2011. If, great job. I like the arm detail!

 

Probably not as he hasn't been on since March of 2012

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • After a relaxing weekend ...
      You will find this helpful.  I have a Freud alignment plate from the way-back machine.  A blade is pretty true but, a dedicated plate will show you just how variable different blades can be.  regardless of the arbor mounted assistant of choice, rotate the plate or blade to check against the same spot front and rear . . . OK, now I'm just repeating what you already know .  Sorry about that, must be the coffee.  
    • After a relaxing weekend ...
      I picked up a Master Plate cheap a couple of months ago. Still, a lot shorter than the miter. Sent from my MotoE2(4G-LTE) using Tapatalk
    • After a relaxing weekend ...
      As C Shaffer said; longer reference plane.  Be sure to avoid the pitfall I read so many mention; use the miter slot you will run your miter gauge in as the reference slot.  Generally this is the left slot but, many folks will post for help after aligning to one slot and then using the other to actually make their cuts.  Test with "A" then use "B"?  Not. One would like to think that machining reasonably parallel miter slots in a tablesaw top would be child's play in our modern age.  However, it seems to escape even the name-brand tablesaw manufacturers in some models. With the blade aligned to the slot and the fence aligned to the same slot you can get very close pretty quickly.  Once you are good at 90* you will have to consider bevel angles. With cabinet mounted trunnions, getting a good alignment at 90* and at 45* is straightforward.  You will love this after struggling with a table-mounted trunnion design.  Once aligned at 90* if the alignment is not true at 45* (usually not) you simply alter the plane of the table to blade relationship.  this is done by shimming the front or rear of the table as required. Shim stock is available but, I have had good success with hole-punched squares of cut up aluminum can that set on the bolts like washers.  A shim as added at both rear mounting points or both front mounting points as required to bring the table into plane at bevel angles. I adjust at 90* and at 45* and satisfy myself that the angles in between are now as good as the machine will allow.  that is; I don't kill myself at 22.5* if it is not perfect. I will say that time invested now in a good alignments will save you time and material (not to mention frustration) for years to come.  Enjoy your new saw ;-)   P.s.  this was helpful to me as well . . .  
    • After a relaxing weekend ...
      The blade is 10"? The miter slot 24"? Think minimization of error.  Also, There is also some flex in the blade. Rather than aligning the blade and arbor etc to the miter slot and then aligning the fence to the blade, align both moving parts to the fixed part. 
  • Popular Contributors

  • Who's Chatting

    There are no users currently in the chat room