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mn pete

OSB Walls going up

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I don't have OSB or plywood walls, but if I did, I would definitely paint them, simply to brighten up the space. Bare wood workshop walls would wick away way too much light, IMO.

-- Russ

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I paint mine for the same reason: Light. I use the cheapest white primer I can find, and put about 2-3 coats. It's amazing how much brighter it will make the environment. For that matter, I paint the floor too - Really reflects a lot of light!

Hope this helps,

Gregory

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I have OSB interior walls in my shop and I did not paint them.

In a way, I wish I had painted but, on the other hand, I like the fact that I can drive a nail or screw in the wall and if it is ever removed, it is hard to see the hole left behind. :)

I have had my shop since about 1970 and over the years, things on the walls have been moved around a few times. The shop was built originally for a race shop. I used to race enduro Go Karts. Then when I got into the tool business it became a warehouse/tool repair shop. And now I'm retired and have become a hobby wood worker. The decor has changed a few times. :lol: :lol: There are a few holes where shelves and cabinets used to hang but, I'm hard pressed to see any holes or shadows that show where things were at a distance. :P

Rog

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I have a garage shop with OSB walls. I primed and painted gloss white, also to help even out the joints i filled with joint compound (no tape). It's probably been about three years since i moved the shop out of the basement and everything has held up extremely well. I was expecting some of the joint compound to pop out but the most it has done is get a small hairline crack in the winter. Attached is a picture shortly after i moved most of the stuff in.

post-520-0-21525500-1321904733_thumb.jpg

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oh... and if i had to do it all again... I would still paint them but i would do it before i hung the OSB. That way all i would have to paint/touch up would be the cracks and screw heads. I use a paint roller extension/poll but it would have been a lot easier to paint flat than vertical.

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Thanks guys! Painting it is. I'm really going to need to maximize lighting down there, so the white walls (and maybe floor) make a lot of sense.

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Painted my walls and ceiling both white. Both are OSB. The floor is epoxy coated which I highly recommend. The OSB does soak up a lot..and I mean a lot! of paint. I used 15 gallons on mine and it is 24x32 and could of used another coat on the ceiling.

Randy

th_SToutage181.jpg

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Floor Epoxy - what product did you use?

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Believe it was the Rustoleum product from Lowes. Its two part mix with the acid cleaner/etch included with the color chips. It takes a lot longer to clean/rinse than to actually paint. Mine was new concrete and it needs to set for a month or two, before applying to allow the moisture to evaporate from the concrete.

Randy

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I did the same thing Randy did. 2 part epoxy floor paint and white paint on OSB. I vote for painting it!

current20shop20004-large.jpg

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I did the same thing Randy did. 2 part epoxy floor paint and white paint on OSB. I vote for painting it!

current20shop20004-large.jpg

Basement shop?

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I am planning on doing this to my shop as well... What kind of paint and primer do you guys use? does it help cover up and seal the roughness of the OSB?

honestly i dont think i have ever been so excited about a painting project :)

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I am planning on doing this to my shop as well... What kind of paint and primer do you guys use? does it help cover up and seal the roughness of the OSB?

honestly i dont think i have ever been so excited about a painting project :)

I used Kilz Primer and Egg Shell White paint in the cheap 5 gallon bucket. You are going to get some yellow bleed through until you get several coats on it. I guess if I would have used better paint I would not have had to contend with the bleed through. After several coats though it looks fine.

John

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dmwechs - no it does not cover the roughness of the OSB but I don't think it looks bad, I think it looks neat. Then again i have plaster walls and think it gives the house character.

I had some Sherwin Williams primer left over and used it along with SW gloss white paint. I don't have any bleed thru. Before I painted mine i read somewhere that gloss paint would not let the dust stick to as much as a flat paint. I can't tell you if that is true or not but that's I did.

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Great tips and good lookin' shops guys! Thanks for sharring.

John, how high are your ceilings? Mine are just under 7 1/2 feet so I'm thinking about doing some recessed can lighting so that I'm not infringing on overhead space. Thoughts from the gallery?

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Great tips and good lookin' shops guys! Thanks for sharring.

John, how high are your ceilings? Mine are just under 7 1/2 feet so I'm thinking about doing some recessed can lighting so that I'm not infringing on overhead space. Thoughts from the gallery?

Can lights are great for saving space, but not so great for making things bright. I just picked up some high output T5 fluorescent fixtures and lights...holy cow those things are ridiculous. They're tiny, too. Little on the pricey side but unbelievably bright. Check 'em out!

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Great tips and good lookin' shops guys! Thanks for sharring.

John, how high are your ceilings? Mine are just under 7 1/2 feet so I'm thinking about doing some recessed can lighting so that I'm not infringing on overhead space. Thoughts from the gallery?

My finished ceiling height is 88" and I used T-8 light fixtures. I am going to be adding a few more to the space.

Thanks!

John

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Thanks John. Mine is a little over 88 inches as well.

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