Nick2cd

Is pecan wood good for......

5 posts in this topic

My wood guy just got in a huge pecan tree. he had it on the bandsaw when i got there. he insisted on slicing me off a 4/4 slab that's probably 14-16" wide. he wouldn't let me pay him a dime for it. it's as green as it can be, so it still needs a year or so to dry. what can i use it for? is it suitable for a cutting board? would it be better tasked for something else? it was extremely heavy, but i think that was mostly because it was still green. i just don't know anything about this species of wood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Nick, nice score. I really dont think that a cutting board is the best application for a slab like that. First off I would get that thing stickered and some stuff on top of it to keep it flat. And me personally, I would use it for something like a table top for a hall table or even a Krenov style cabinet. I think that he used to use a bit of pecan for his stuff. the good thing is that you will have about a year to think about it unless you put it in a kiln. Let us know what you do with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't forget to seal the ends of the boards to keep the checking down . That's a nice score you got there , wide boards like that are super rare these days use it for something special . Post some pics of it if you can , would love to see it .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pecan is related to Walnut and Hickory and between them in hardness in my opinion. Medium colored and way too nice for a cutting board. Table top or fine handmade furniture come to mind. Seal the ends, sticker it, weigh it down and give it a year or so. An air dried plank should work well with basic hand or power tools. I hope you get something nice from your plank.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had a boat load of pecan that I got from a local widow. There are some pictures in a thread around here somewhere.

Here is the thread: http://woodtalkonline.com/topic/1395-a-craiglist-bandsaw-and-a-little-someting-extra

Anyway, color in pecan can range from a creamy color in the sapwood and butterscotch to an almost walnut brown in the heart, as you can see in the pictures in that thread.

I have gotten good results filling knots and voids with epoxy. I tint the epoxy a bit to match the color of the surrounding wood. Knots and voids are ususally fairly dark, so I use a little walnut transtint dye in the epoxy.

With air drying, you are more than likely going to experience some splitting from the ends. Get some sealant (or a thick coat of latex house paint) on the ends to help prevent that.

Another problem I have seen is boreholes in the sapwood (and frass) from wood-boring insects. I have filled boreholes with untinited epoxy with good success.

You will have to do your own research about pecan insects, based on your area. Call you county extension agent, that would be a good place to start.

Like others have said, get it stickered, dry and flat and forget about it for a year or so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now



  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I've yet to encounter a woodworker that isn't willing to explain, usually in great detail, how to do something.   Talented builder. From that guy's site. http://www.furnituremakercleveland.com/showgallery.php?catid=47 That chest of drawers is beautiful. Building something like this is my goal.
    • Stunning!  Well done.  Be very proud!
    • Interesting!  But not so unusual.  Some things are evolving, and those involved want to keep their methods from the public, in order to derive a benefit.  Wood workers on the other hand, are redoing a centuries old process! There isn't to much that's new in wood work, with the exception of the tools ! There are designs that are difficult to quantify, but for the most part, the construction is the same as it has been for many years. Those that work in wood will gladly share knowledge because it's not a secret process, it's been here as long as the first club used to hunt meat!
    • The Ruler Trick, championed by David Charlesworth, is an excellent quick method of ensuring that the back of a plane blade is as well prepared as the bevel face. This is not for everyone (I do not use it currently), but it does have its supporters, and some are very well-known and experienced woodworkers. Where the RT is particularly helpful is when honing BU plane blades. The very fine (2/3 degree) backbevel is placed where a wear bevel might otherwise grow. A wear bevel will reduce the edge on these blades. The RT will prevent its incusion. Regards from Perth Derek
    • Personally, I prefer using the cheap plastic french curves. Those stainless steel ones look really nice, but the avantage of being able to see through the plastic is that you obtain a better view of the lines you are drawing. Sometimes prettier gets in the way. Regarding the use of brass or other metal on the teeth of rasps and files, my view is that these will cause extra wear a lot faster than wood. I sometimes spray with a little 3-in-1 to soften any stuck waste, and then use a bristle brush (these are also used for polishing shoes). Regards from Perth Derek
  • Popular Contributors

  • Who's Chatting

    There are no users currently in the chat room