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Nick2cd

Need plans, ideas, or sketches for 3 tier table

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I need a table to sit between 2 recliners. i need it to have 3 tiers. some general dimensions are 18" wide. 32" tall and 32" deep. i'd like some general ideas or sketches to get me started.

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Lots of variables here that lead to lots of questions:

- Do all three tiers need to be accessible from above?

- Can the lowest tier be near ground level?

- Should the tiers be evenly spaced with respect to height?

- Does each tier need to have the same surface area?

- Is there a style and.or shape you are looking for?

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only guidelines would be that the lowest tier needs to be 18" off the ground. the tiers need to gradually get smaller as they ascend (bottom tier largest, top tier smallest).

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Google Images is a great way to get tons of ideas real quick. Go there and type "three-tier end table" (without the quotes) and be amazed.

-- Russ

beamansw likes this

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only guidelines would be that the lowest tier needs to be 18" off the ground. the tiers need to gradually get smaller as they ascend (bottom tier largest, top tier smallest).

Maybe I'm confused, but I'm thinking that 18" is a good height for the top of a table for a recliner. How tall is this thing going to be? 18" plus two shelves at 6" is 30", which is desk height.

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Maybe I'm confused, but I'm thinking that 18" is a good height for the top of a table for a recliner. How tall is this thing going to be? 18" plus two shelves at 6" is 30", which is desk height.

It needs to be around 32" tall. They need the top tier to hold a lamp.

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Nick, I don’t see a reference that each tier is the same size (width and length (deep?)), or if they step down in size from the bottom tier to the top tier. As Russ has already suggested, here are two Google image searches. This one is for a 3 tier “end” table, and this one is for a 3 tier table as you stated.

I see that the “end” table search shows a number of tables with equal sized tiers. The 3 tier table search shows many tables with progressively smaller tiers. If you could, perhaps post a picture of one that is close to what you are thinking about.

Thanks.

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Nick, I don’t see a reference that each tier is the same size (width and length (deep?)), or if they step down in size from the bottom tier to the top tier. As Russ has already suggested, here are two Google image searches. This one is for a 3 tier “end” table, and this one is for a 3 tier table as you stated.

I see that the “end” table search shows a number of tables with equal sized tiers. The 3 tier table search shows many tables with progressively smaller tiers. If you could, perhaps post a picture of one that is close to what you are thinking about.

Thanks.

only guidelines would be that the lowest tier needs to be 18" off the ground. the tiers need to gradually get smaller as they ascend (bottom tier largest, top tier smallest).

I typed in "three tier table like Nick wants" - did I come close? :D

What will you do with all that space under the first tier?

John

John, that is probably the closest design to what they would need. i don't know what they'll do with the unused space. guess i could close it in and make a small cabinet

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-Russ is spot on with google images. You can brainstorm quickly and isolate what you like from what you don't. Another great place is Pinterest! If you don't have an account, let me know and I can send you an invitation. It's my favorite place on the web.....

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Just curious Nick. Did you get a chance yet to look through the pictures in the two links I posted, to see what might be close to your design needs. Thanks.

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Just curious Nick. Did you get a chance yet to look through the pictures in the two links I posted, to see what might be close to your design needs. Thanks.

I did look at the links and came up with a rough design. Thank u for the help

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