Brian VanVreede

dual key lock

12 posts in this topic

So I was just commissioned to make a wine box/time capsule for a wedding. The idea is to keep the box displayed open, at the wedding so that guests can put notes to the bride and groom inside the box. After the reception they want to lock the box with the wine and notes inside and not open until their 10 year anniversary. So my plan is to make the box hold the bottle of wine, the 2 glasses they toasted with, a opener and all of the notes. What I really think will put this box over the top is my idea for the locking mechanism. I am looking for a fancy lock that requires 2 different keys to open, each the bride and groom will get their own key.

My question is, has anyone heard of a lock like this? I looked in the Lee valley hardware catalog and didn't find what I was looking for.

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I would just lock the box with two separate locks - that way they both have to be opened for the box to open. Make sure that the two locks use different keys. Often, jewelry box locks will use the same key.

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wow i would put realy awful notes inside becuse they wont know till 10 years from now. hehehehehe i can just imagine what they are going to get in there:)

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Beech, that's what I'm looking for. 1 locking mechanism that requires 2 different keys or 2 identical locking mechanisms that each have a unique key. The idea is that they must still be together in order to open the box.

I don't want 2 different looking locking mechanisms. And I want it to look antique -ish, no "master locks"!

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You're right - most antique looking locks are keyed alike, and the ones that are keyed differently are modern looking.

You can get a simple, brass-toned "modern" lock that might be OK. You can find them without logos or brand names on them, but the shape of the key and keyway will make it clear that it's a "real" lock.

Or, I searched for "antique cabinet lock keyed different" and found this and this. The "economy" one should be good enough - you only need two different keys, and I assume that you really aren't concerned about people picking the lock.

If picking the lock is a concern, then you should go with a modern style lock, maybe with an antique estucheon.

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Thanks for the link beech! Looks like this could work.

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That's only a little more than 100 bucks...right? That's not that bad for that kind of quality! And its actually exactly what I am looking for!

Thanks

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That is uber-cool. I'd be tempted to buy one just to see the quality engineering involved..

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That's only a little more than 100 bucks...right? That's not that bad for that kind of quality! And its actually exactly what I am looking for!

Thanks

Today, it's about $110. Who knows where the exchange rate will go next?

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