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duckkisser

lathe made busness card holder

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ok i was thinking of making a busness card holder on the lathe. something fast and easy so i can make a few to set up around town at local stores. i was thinking of just making a simple tear shaped stand with a slot in it. problem is i cant seem to think of any way to make the slot for the card to sit in. i woudl cut the slot before i turn it except im afraid that the cut in the wood would end up chiping out. so think it would be better to cut the slot after its turned. so how could i cut a slot in a tear shaped form on say the table saw ill probably need some kind of jig to hold it steady.

i have always felt that wood workers have to be rather ingenious to solve building problems so let see what we can achive.

http://www.google.co...em7ZXLAg&zoom=1 maybe something like this

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Make the cut first if the design allows it. It is going to be exponentially safer.

Google "open segmented bowl". You'll see that it, in fact, is done all of the time and chipping, if using sharp tools, is not an issue.

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i would still like to build a round busness holder but i think the easest thing to make is a cylinder on the lathe leaving a square block on each end. then run it thought the table saw and then round off the ends. then i just set the cylinder on the sander flatten off one end and then i have my card holder. can probably make 5-6 in a hour easy and fast so who cares if i dont get one stand back from leaving at a resturant or store.

if anyone can think of how i can make a round disc shaped card holder let me know.

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ok i emailed captneddie(http://eddiecastelin.com/) and he gave me a great idea. cut the slot out on table saw then take a piece of wood and lightly glue in tight into the slot. then turn my piece and nock the piece of wood out leaving behind the slot.

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