linkmx674

stacking wood?

7 posts in this topic

what is the best way to stack lumber? the lumber yard that i bought it from had it stacked up against the wall. so when i brought it home i did they same. should i be stacking it flat on racks?(if i had lumber racks but i don't) I'm letting the wood sit to my shops temp before i work with it. this is my first time buying rough sawn lumber. all the other projects have been with s4s from save big money stores.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

laid down flat is the best way to store your lumber, but that may not be an option if you don't have the floor space. The temperature isn't really the issue, moreso the humidity when you let lumber acclimate to your shop space. If you do have to lean it against the wall, try to find some way to keep it flat against the wall...if you have it just leaning, eventually it will sag in the middle and take on a bow.

You may consider working out a lumber rack hanging from the ceiling, or building some racking if you have the wall space...If you don't have a lot of lumber to store, you may be able to use some inexpencive shelf supports from the local big box...LOTS of options for making a wood rack...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Flat on conventional wall racks are usually best in small shops. A-Frame racks are great but most dont have the space. You can lean against the wall but stand it against a 2x or 2 on edge, sort of like an A-Frame rack. Do NOT lay it on the floor or workbench.

Don

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i bought it on saturday and will be using by this weekend- so i am hoping it will hold its form. im not actually storing and stacking it since im using it soon. i guess i need to save up for some wall racks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wall racks are always convenient as well as racks which hang from the ceiling. A lot of times I end up using a cart to throw things on if I know I will be using them shortly. That way you can move it around as you work in different areas of the shop

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know you've probably already used the wood that you wrote about in this thread, but just thought I'd add my experience with storing/acclimating rough lumber without a rack in my own shop. If you've already built yourself a rack, just disregard.

I've been meaning to build a rack in my space, but have been too pre-occupied with other projects. My make-shift method seems to be working well for now: just lay a few 2x4s (cut to a few feet long and spaced 12-16" apart) as a base, stack on this and sticker between boards (with scrap wood of equal thickness to keep things level and flat). Weigh down the top boards (directly above the sticks) with odds and ends from around the shop - tools boxes, cases, etc. It takes up some floor space that I'd like to use in other ways, but it's better than leaning it against a wall. I need to build an actual rack soon, but I've been getting by just fine like this for a while.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now



  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Looks really good. So the upper left storage is for Systainers and the Fastenal boxes? You could get rid of the fastenal boxes to keep the width of those shelves systainer size and get a new Sortainer Sys 4. Really awesome. Hard to believe how much stuff you can fit in it. Sent from my SM-N910W8 using Tapatalk
    • I spoke with Mark at BA today. One Stiletto dovetail saw is on its way...in 6 to 8 weeks. Thanks for everyone's input.
    • With the hijack and a foot injury, I spent some time really thinking about the things that either don't currently have a home or needed a better one. I put the results of that thought process in Sketchup and this is what I think I've settled on: I cut down on the number of systainers stored, at least at first, and keep the good upper storage I put in before. I increased the width of the upper section to accommodate the Fastenal compartment boxes I enjoy as well. Otherwise it's adjustable shelves, and at least one of the cabinets will have a door to help cut down on dust accumulation from the miter saw. The wood rack moves over to the right side of the miter, as does the jointer. For the amount it gets used, I can stand to move the MFT when the time comes. If it turns out I need more lower storage and that space isn't otherwise used, I can add another bank of drawers or anything else between the planer cart and the systainer drawers.
    • Interesting... I think I thought the beadlock tenons would fit more snugly in the mortise than that.I'll have to experiment with doing them with a router and my own stock... but that doesn't seem like it would be any less work than just doing a standard M&T, either.

      Maybe I'll hold off for a while... if I need alignment I've always got my biscuit joiner and if I need something fast I can always just use dowels... and then I'll stick to traditional joinery for the rest. Thanks for educating me, gentlemen!
    • Don't get me wrong.  Beadlock and dowel joints are quite stout.  When you start comparing a dowel joint that fails around 750lbs to a beadlock that fails around 830 lbs to a floating tenon that fails around 1400 lbs you have to ask; will I ever put 800 lbs of force on that joint!?!  Look how much cope and stick cabinetry is in kitchens all over the country and they fail at around 320 lbs. One that surprised me was that a half-lap was stronger than a bridal joint.  I would have thought the captured open tenon would be stronger but, it seems the thicker material of a half lap wins.  Festoolians reel seeing dominos holding only a little better than biscuits but, not as good as pocket screws.with glue. Beadlock: Floating tenon: I have also seen tests where epoxy was substituted for PVA glue.  The joints where the connection points failed did better but, most joints fail at the surrounding material.  The more seamless that connection, the more stress is transferred away from the joint and into the balance of the material. You need to be a subscriber for this link but, there are other tests out there on the internet that are similar.  I try not to go too weird-science on this stuff.  There are plenty of joints, some stronger or weaker than each other, that are just fine for what we're doing.  
  • Popular Contributors

    1. 1
      Eric.
      Eric.
      70
    2. 2
    3. 3
    4. 4
      Mike.
      Mike.
      47
    5. 5
      Llama
      Llama
      47
  • Who's Chatting

    There are no users currently in the chat room