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walnut shavings

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Posted · Report post

Is there any use out there for shavings that may or may not contain walnut. I know a lot of horse stables use wood shavings for bedding. But apparently they won't take walnut due to it causing respiratory issues in horses. I hate throwing this stuff away constantly. What do u guys do with it. Will other farmers take it for differant animals or are there the same concerns there. Thanks guys

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Posted · Report post

You can always compost it. It would make a good "dry" (high carbon) complementto "wet" (high nitgrogen) ingredients. In other words: wood shavings plus kitchen scraps plus grass clippings plus fall leaves plus manure (if you can get it) plus water plus air plus time equals good quality compost equals good natural fertilizer.

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Posted · Report post

I use them for compost or mulch, sometimes also in the fireplace but is quite dangerous because thin and dry shavings burn as quickly as gasoline...

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Posted · Report post

I sometimes use wood shavings instead of newspaper to start the woodstove (just dont use too many). I also use them for mulch.

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Posted · Report post

Shotgun fungus grows on wood mulch. It fires off seed packets at painted, reflective objects (eg cars, houses). The seed packets have a sticky, tar like coating and they are very difficult to clean. I'd keep the wood mulch a good distance from anything painted.

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Posted · Report post

If you don't want to compost the shavings in your own yard, see if a local nursery could use them.

The type of nursery with plants and flowers....... not small children

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Posted · Report post

Black walnut trees should not be chipped for landscape wood chip use. Black walnut trunks, branches, and roots contain naturally occurring chemical compounds (juglone) that inhibit plant growth.

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Posted · Report post

Black walnut trees should not be chipped for landscape wood chip use. Black walnut trunks, branches, and roots contain naturally occurring chemical compounds (juglone) that inhibit plant growth.

I believe that thoroughly composting the black walnut will "digest" the juglone and the resulting compost will be safe. Here's an article.

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Posted · Report post

I give mine to the local pottery school. There is a special firing to make pots called "raku". They like hardwoods shaving.

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