baok

Wooden Hand Plane

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Well, I've been using google+ to tell this story but it seems to be dwindling in popularity. So I'll put it here.

I bought David Finck's book on plane-making and am almost done with my first one. Made of walnut that a friend harvested from the tree fall of a huge ice storm back in 2007.

I first wedges the iron I last night and tried it out. It made shavings so that's encouraging.

Photos to follow.

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Looking forward to this. I too want to make some planes of my own.

Update: Just ordered the book you mentioned, thanks for that!

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I am sort of still in the process of making a block plane and a smoother myself. By that I mean they work but I haven't shaped them to their final form. I've been using the heck out of the block plane already even though there's sharp edges and dowels sticking out all over the place :lol: It was a pretty funny moment to use the still-rough-cut block plane to start flattening the bottom of the smoother.

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I found the plans for that plane online a few years back! I even ought the wood just havent bought the iron! Where did you get the iron? Are you happy with the finished product? Sure looks nice!

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I bought my iron from David Finck off his website. It's a hard steel and so takes a bit of time to sharpen but it cuts well. I have yet to resharpen it.

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