suiciedchild

figured wood ID please

22 posts in this topic

Alrighty, never seen this one before. i got two pieces , both about 2x2" and 4' long, they were the bottom supports for a skid of Brazilian Cherry hardwood flooring, i always grab them usually something like brazilian cherry sometimes purpleheart or cumaru . but this had a crazy looking grain to it, i hit it with my hand plane to get rid of the rough sawn edges to get a good look at the grain, and holy crap. grabbed some BLO and rubbed it on and the picture is what i got. Its not lacewood off the bat , i already had somebody suggest that but it just doesn't have those big ray,s the grain changes direction all over the place i believe the country of origin was Paraguay, not sure if the skid was from there but the product on top was , so likely it is. anybody care to take a stab at this ?

post-4665-0-50179500-1332301725_thumb.jp

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I have no idea, but it sure is gorgeous!

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From the picture it looks like figured Amboyna. but it could be a lot of different things.

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Beautiful. Please send it to me so I can closer analyze it. ;)

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It's just sitting on my rack , I kinda don't want to use it on anything till I know what it is, and I can't make too much out of it, what would you guys do with it ? 2"x 2" x approx 3'6" or so? Really sweet looking baseball bat?

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Once again one of nature's beauties. I haven't a clue what it is.

The bottom support for hardwood flooring!!!! What a waste.

Can you post a picture of the end grain please?

Sometimes that help.

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yeah if my bandsaw wasn't a peice of crap, but i have already tried it, it did not end well.

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Is there such a thing as figured sapele?

I have no idea what the wood if but it looks beautiful. Maybe make some pens of something with it?? How heavy is it?

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There is figured sapele, I believe it gets the waterfall or the "pommele" figure, it's pretty heavy. I do have a few pieces of sapale in my shop and it just doesn't look close enough for me to think that is what it is color and grain wise.

I would/ might make a couple pens out of a piece of it , but I don't want it to lose that figure on a small turning.

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This piece was the bottom support for a skid of Brazilian Cherry? Is it possible that it's figured Brazilian Cherry?I'm just imagining if I were a sawyer building a skid of lumber and needed a support or sticker the easiest thing to use may be a scrap of the very same lumber I'm currently stacking.

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Wat about knife handles? I think that would look great. The stock is the right dimensions too.

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Do you have a picture without the BLO rubbed on it? With the BLO on it, it reminds me of Bubinga (the waterfall looking side). The top looks like a “quilted” pattern similar to what you would see in quilted maple. Where’s Bruce Hoadley when you need him?

As Johan suggested, you might take a plane with a very sharp blade to the end grain to sever the fibers cleanly. Then take a very close, sharp picture with good lighting (try positioning the light 45 degrees from a perpendicular to the surface), and post a largish picture of it. This may allow someone who’s into wood ID, to narrow it down to a particular species.

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Ok tomorrow or tonight I'll get some better pics of it without the blo and the end grain.

If someone really does want a piece of it I got 2 pieces I'd be more than willing to cut up one of them into smaller peices and send em out if you want to cover the shipping if someone has an idea for a piece of it. just message me.

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here is the end grain , im still tring to get the pic of the regular grain without the blo to load correctly

post-4665-0-10581400-1332728860_thumb.jp

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alrighty , I think we have a winner. i checked on hobbit house , there are a good amount of pics that show similar figure and color/grain , also wikipedia show that bubinga does grow in south america , so i think that guess is as good as any we will get , well done sir.

on a side note , that is an impresive piece of wood you have there , want to trade?

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Bubinga, is found in equatorial Africa, and 3 species is found in South America. I don't think you have bubinga.

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It looks close enough for me. It may or may not be , but it's probably the closest thing I've seen.

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How does it smell when you planed it? My experience with bubinga is that it have a distinct sweet smell to it, especially when sanding it.

But species from other sources may vary. And bubinga is a dense heavy wood. It is hard to believe that they use it for bottom supports for a skid.

And from the end grain point of view it does not look like bubinga at all. Bubinga has a distinct purple vein to the grow rings which turned brown with exposure to UV.

The more I look at it, the more I am convinced that it is from the Eucalyptus or the Sydney blue gum family.

http://www.hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/sidney%20blue%20gum.htm

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The piece I have is very heavy, I'd say comparable in weight to a similar peice of purpleheart I have. I'm going to make a mallet out of one of the pieces . So we'll see how it cleans up, maybe that will help when it's all sanded and finished.

I looked at the red gum, it does look similar ,I don't think as close as the bubinga but I'm going to look for some more pics.

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