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12 Lighthearted Questions for Kari Hultman, The Village Carpenter


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Posted · Report post

It was a great post. But, I love Kari. She is an awesome artist and phenomenal person.

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Posted · Report post

That was great. Kari, is good folks and a great person to be interviewed first.

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Posted · Report post

Thanks Guys! I am looking forward to more!

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