Miles

Window trim finnish

5 posts in this topic

I recently had new construction windows installed. In the bathroom I fabricated and installed the jamb extensions and trim using cherry. In all the other rooms to date I used poplar that I painted with an interior latex. With the cherry, given the bathroom humidity I used three coats of a water based poly. ThE problem is I'm getting discoloration between the shade and window. I'm assuming that this is UV damage. Is there a Finnish that would've been better? I'd like to do the same with the windows in the kitchen but obviously have to fix this problem first.

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You know cherry will darken with sunlight, right? Even with a good uv protector,it will still get darker in time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Over time it should even out. The parts that get direct sunlight will darken first, but the rest should eventually catch up. But, as my wife likes to say, that may have ass matter all over it. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When reno-ing a kitchen, I found the hardwood underneath the cabinets to have a different colour than the rest of the exposed floor (even though the factory finish is supposed to be UV protectant). Sunlight will always win. Eventually, the darker floor will catch up the rest, just as your window trim will eventually even out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, I should have been more specific. The discoloration is a milky haze. It looks sun bleached. This is a north facing window and the trim has been installed for. 6-8 months or so. The cabinets and chair rail in the bathroom are also cherry so I'm familiar with the darkening.

Is it over kill to use an exterior grade Finnish? http://www.epifanes.com/

With all the condensation on cold nights there was a good deal of moisture

Thanks for your thoughts

Miles

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now



  • Topics

  • Posts

    • LV Starter set of Hand Planes
      Very good value, for me it would actually be cheaper to buy direct from LV and pay international shipping. On steel choice, unless you work very abrasive timber the ease of sharpening is actually very valuable. For what I like to do I'd stick with 01.
    • Blotchy gel stain on oak table
      I am absolutely a newbie with wood refinishing of all kinds. I am trying to refinish a solid oak table (and benches) my dad made years ago. I sanded it down with 120 grit sandpaper. After sanding, I applied a quick, light coat of mineral spirits as suggested by the General Finishes tutorial video to reduce lap marks on a large surface. I am using General Finishes gel stain in Brown Mahogany. I applied my first coat of stain with a foam brush, and then wiped off the excess stain with a shop towel. The whole tabletop looks TERRIBLY blotchy. See the attached pictures: the lighter table is after 1 coat, the darker table is after 2. The table is not covered in lap marks or streaks, but with big areas that are not absorbing the stain well. After waiting and applying a second coat, it looks the same, with the same areas not accepting as much stain (which leads me to believe it is a problem with the wood itself rather than the application of stain).  From my research, it seems as though I just need to sand off the entire finish again and start from scratch with a different game plan. Is that my best option for fixing it? Or can I salvage it at this point? I've been reading that I then need to apply dewaxed shellac or some kind of wood conditioner to help the stain go on evenly. Any suggestions on kinds?? And where to buy them? And more importantly, will that help?? Lastly, the previous finish that my dad always used on this table every time was Danish oil. Although I have sanded the surface thoroughly, is it possible the previous Danish oil having seeped in deeply is the problem as to why the stain is so blotchy?? Anything I can do about that? I am now extremely frustrated with the gel stain and am not sure if I should even bother with it anymore. If the problem is with the previous Danish oil, would it make sense to just use Danish oil again instead of a stain? I would like the table to be a medium to dark wood, and I have seen Danish oil in dark or black walnut that would be pretty (I hate the red tone of the brown mahogany stain, but the blotchiness is the more pressing concern). I would prefer to keep the wood grain visible, hence why I am using stains and not paints, but I am getting to the point I just want to give up and paint over the whole thing 😡 Any help/tips/advice would be greatly appreciated!!!
    • LV Starter set of Hand Planes
      Noticed they give you the choice of 2 types of steel, 01 or PMV-11...anyone have the TL;DR on which is better? Edit: found this online...looks to be written by the guys at LV, so not sure about lack of bias, but thought I'd share anyway   source:  http://www.pm-v11.com/Story.aspx
    • Stain wont take
      its veneer.  plywood is often heavier than solid wood.
    • Pallet wood...
      No i meant that website. The frames are cool!
  • Popular Contributors

  • Who's Chatting

    There are no users currently in the chat room