Nben

I am thinking of buying a Grizzly G0634Z 12" Planer/Jointer with Spiral Cutterhead

16 posts in this topic

Sorry for the repost, I could not figure out how to delete my previous post. Just getting used to this forum software and thought a better title might help and additional questions at the end.

http://www.grizzly.c...s-G0634-/G0634Z

I am thinking of buying this 12" jointer/planer. I have half of a two car garage as my shop and I really do not have space for both a jointer and a planer. I have a Grizzly table saw and I have been happy with it. I want a spiral cutting head as the carbide inserts seem to be a more Eric proof means of leveling (as opposed to knives) and from what I have read the spiral shearing action gives smoother results.

I would be interested to hear what you all think of this as I am almost ready to pull the trigger.

What do you all think?

Is a spiral cutter head worth the expense?

Will the combined nature of this machine be more painful than any human should endure?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would not buy a all in one unless it had a Tersa head.

Don

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a 10" Rikon jointer/planer combo, and I love it. Here's why I got it.

1. Small shop.

2. Cheap way to get a wide jointer.

The only way I would replace my 10" jointer/planer combo is to get a 12" model. And the only reason I don't have a 12" model is because I don't have the space.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the answers! If anyone else would care to answer it would be very helpful!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Eric. For folks who are short on space, the combo machines are a really good option. And this certainly looks like a decent unit just judging from what I see and the price range.

The combo units I worry about (and recommend against) are the ones that are under $1000.

Personally I do think a spiral/helical heads are worth paying more for. As you mentioned, cut quality, setup, and maintenance are all great reasons.

Now if you had the room, I would encourage you to go with separates. But if the space dictates a smaller foot print, you'll probably be well-served with a machine like this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks I feel like I can rest a little easier now :-) I have a number of upcoming projects that are in need of accurately dimensioned and jointed wood. Too many commissions :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pulled the trigger, will let you all know how it works out. Now to buy that harbor freight shop crane.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well thank goodness for the harbor freight shop crane! It greatly facilitated getting that monster off the pallet :-) Working on getting the cosmoline off of the cutter head now. I think I am going to buy an inch/pound torque wrench and remove all the carbide inserts (tired of finding out how sharp those boogers are).

I am going to try to get the tables leveled and parallel this weekend, Straight edge and Una-Gauge (http://www.betterleytools.com/unagauge/unagauge.html) to the rescue. The test firing went well

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nben, I have owned the 634z with the spiral cutter head for about two years and it has been an excellent tool. The spiral cutter head is worth every penny. No tear out and it runs much quieter. It's like butter over figured lumber. I have plenty of room in my shop and buying combo machine wasn't a necessity due to space, I just wanted to buy the combo machine because, to me, it just makes sense for them to be together. Jointing as wide as I can plane makes sense. I was concerned over the shorter length beds over my 8" with extended beds, but it really hasn't been a problem. Just use rollers if you need the support.

I still use my 8" Grizzly G0500 and the Dewalt DW734 on occasions, but not often. It's actually nice having the lunchbox planer when I'm batching tasks and I can have both running.

Grizzly's 12" combo machines are definitely some of their better hardware.

Good luck and let me know how you like it.

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stahlee, so far so good, I feel that I have got things lined up pretty well and the tests I have done with jointing and planing have produced square and flat surfaces. Can not see sunlight between any of the surfaces when held together etc... Looks like it is time to buy a pile of wood and get working on some projects!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What shop crane did you get, and how hard was it to use single handed (I assume?).

Cheers,

Brian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought the 1 ton shop crane from harbor freight (The legs of the crane were not wide enough to go around the pallet so I engaged in the slightly nerve wracking exercise of lift/scooting the jointer off the pallet). I punched out the lifting holes on the jointer and hooked in some 2 ton strap clamps (with ratcheting heads) tightened them good and tight, jacked up the jointer a bit and moved it until it would not move on the pallet any further (repeated 3 or 4x) until I managed to get a set of the legs off of the pallet and onto the floor. I then took some iron pipes and oh so gently lifted up the back legs enough that I was able to kick the pallet out from under the jointer. Finally I lowered the jointer and scooted the crane up close to it. Finally I lifted the jointer about a quarter inch off of the floor and slowly moved the crane to where I wanted to place the jointer (Warning the manual for the crane says not to do this sort of thing but I have been pulling engines and swinging them around like this for years).

The worst part was getting it off the pallet and once that was done everything was easy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nben,

 

Any follow up comments after using it for a year? I am in the process of purchasing jointer / planer or combo.  I'm interested in how this turned out

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was wondering what a "shop crane" was, so I Googled it.  That's what I've always heard called an "engine hoist", so I Googled "engine hoist", and sure enough it's the same thing.  I have an old one that my Dad had, and it is indeed a handy thing to have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nben, Any follow up comments after using it for a year? I am in the process of purchasing jointer / planer or combo. I'm interested in how this turned out.

 

It works good, the spiral cutter head is good, and switching modes is not too bad as long as you batch your operations

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now



  • Topics

  • Posts

    • If you're looking to make some dark wood, you can also burn/scorch the surface.  If you google "shou sugi ban" there's some information on it.  It's Japanese style of finishing that's more intended for construction.  You basically scorch the surface then brush off the ash.  It turns it black and brings out the grain pattern.  Also makes it fire/bug resistant.  I tried it out over the holidays on some small pieces of cedar.  Most of these I just barely hit with a torch, but the black ones I just spent a little longer.  They look like ebony, but it's not expensive.  It's only a surface treatment though, so when you cut the wood, your back to regular wood.  Might not be that different that dying wood though.  I ended up getting a roofing torch and scorching a bunch of 1x6 pine boards from Home depot.  They look really nice (and jet black).  Plan to much some outdoor planters when the weather warms up.  
    • All of the poly finishes will be more protective, but I love the feel of the wood itself, preferably not coated in thick plastic.  If it's your desk and not a general conference table then I wouldn't rule out an oil/wax finish.  You don't have to worry about streaks or brush marks or drips because you just buff it off.  My current favorite is Odies oil which makes the grain stand out, but since it soaks in, you're still feeling the wood and not the finish.  If you want it a little more protected, then I'd just add some extra wax.  That said, if a lot of people are using it, then go ahead and seal it up.  Anyone who hasn't finished their own table is probably not going to be too careful with coasters or spilled coffee.  
    • These look great, especially to see it go from Sketchup to actual furniture.  I think the finish looks good.  I'd be afraid to try to do anything to the bottom now for fear that it would screw up the finish on the top that looks so even.  Maybe hand paint the bottom if you really wanted to, or clear coat the whole thing?
    • These are beautiful!  How do you like the plans?  Well written?  I've thought about trying to make the rocking chair on their site, but I don't know anyone who's built it.
    • ran into it one time which was painful, but I learn fast, no problem since.  You can also make them much shorter.  There's no structural reason they need to stick out, I just liked it.   The joint is rock solid because it's about 4 inches deep.    I was expecting some movement, and nothing moves.   The entire rails are actually resting on the flat bottom of the grove I cut out on the router so it's really stable.  There's no hardware that holds the rails to the legs.  When I was setting it up, I did run into problems with the rails bowing out  and allowing the slats to fall through the middle.  I was going to fix that with some pegs that would secure the rail to the slats, and I'm still planning to.  Once I put the mattress on it though, it's a foam mattress and it basically secured the slats from moving in any direction.  Hasn't been a problem since.   Agreed, I like the when the wood just fits together.  Since these didn't get glued together like a mortise/tenon, it was also a lot more forgiving putting it together. Still haven't been able to teach him to use it though
  • Popular Contributors

  • Who's Chatting

    There are no users currently in the chat room