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The Hobbyist

Japanese Lamp Planning

12 posts in this topic

Hey everyone,

FIRST POST! YAY :D

I'm planning on making a Japanese lamp, loosley based around this:

wpf9d91105.png

I cannot however for the life of me figure out how to join the horizontals and the verticals to allow those little cubes to stick out!

If anyone here can offer any guidance as to how to proceed, I would be very appreciative!

Thanks, Dan

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I would suggest that you try half-lap notches. You can do horizontal laps on two and verticle laps on the two that adjoin. It would be similar to the old Lincoln Logs.

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Nice project. Those are beautiful! Be sure to post progress photos!

(null)

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here is how the boards get put together thanks rtexas lincoln logs is a great example http://www.contractortalk.com/attachments/f50/12837d1303916700t-deck-screws-vs-joist-nails-6x-notches-retreated.jpg

hobbyist you might want to look up frank loyd wright inspired lamps while normaly i dont recomend anything on frank loyd wright since he sacraficed alot of construction musts so the houses would look more artistic and better. (example would not put in pillers to support the roof even though the construction crew said there has to be a suport or else down the road the roof will colapse) anywho these lamps might give you some insperation.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41iswMTiLLL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

http://www.lightwavelaser.com/images/FLW/mini-lightboxes/Large/Coonley-Mini-Lamp_388.jpg

http://www.finewoodworking.com/assets/uploads/posts/12070/IMG_2930.JPG

http://etc.shopsoflo.com/wp-content/gallery/lighting/l006.jpg

http://www.lightwavelaser.com/images/FLW/mini-lightboxes/Large/Sumac-Mini-Lamp_388.jpg

another thought try shining a light through some veneer if its thin enough that can act like a lamp shade.

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Hey everyone,

FIRST POST! YAY :D

Welcome, Dan.

I'm planning on making a Japanese lamp,

I cannot however for the life of me figure out how to join the horizontals and the verticals to allow those little cubes to stick out!

If anyone here can offer any guidance as to how to proceed, I would be very appreciative!

Thanks, Dan

Well, that's a great question for a first post. I personally thought that it was an 'impossible' joint, and I still think it is - if you have to put 12 of them together at the same time. On an Italian forum this little table came up, which is a large scale version of just one of those joints. (The full post is here, I just thought that pictures speak louder than words.) It's called a three piece burr. The videos here show how it is put together, and this is a sketchup photo I put together of the joint. This page gives more details - in English - just click on the 'three piece burrs' link.

Is that how the lantern is made? I doubt it, because you'd have to jiggle all those joints together at the same time. However if you look at the bottom of the page in that last link there is a drawing of a 'fake' three piece burr. Perhaps I'm cynical, but I'd bet ready money that that is how those lamps were put together.

John

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This is Chinese joinery where you are using complex angles to achieve the two-planed visual effect. Willian Ng at the Ng school in LA uses them.

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These types of Japanese "Shoji" lamps sell for less than $50.

Consider buying one and studying/disassembling it as a cheap way of gaining some insight into Japanese joinery.

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I think I remember seeing this joint in a sashimono video. I bookmarked the video, but it was pulled from YouTube for copyright violation. Maybe you can find a book or video that describes how to make sashimono style joints.

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Two days ago I returned a book to the library that showed, in detail, how to make these kinds of joints. They look complicated, but fun to try.

I don't recall the title but the book was by David Charlesworth

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There is a Canadian guy who designs and builds Japanese lamps and screens. Here is his link. He is the editor of a popular Canadian woodworking magazine. Maybe send him an email - I've talked with him on the phone and he is a nice guy.

http://www.equinoxinteriors.ca/#/home

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Hey everyone,

FIRST POST! YAY :D

I'm planning on making a Japanese lamp, loosley based around this:

...

I cannot however for the life of me figure out how to join the horizontals and the verticals to allow those little cubes to stick out!

If anyone here can offer any guidance as to how to proceed, I would be very appreciative!

Thanks, Dan

Dan,

I have just started making some Japanese lamps that are similar, same effect, based on the book "Making Japanese Style Lamps and Lanterns" by Edward Turner. You can find it on amazon.com, some pages are available to preview there. Attached are pictures of my practice set to see how two sides come together. All half laps.

-Cindy

post-5342-0-39093900-1340843495_thumb.jp

post-5342-0-86358600-1340843510_thumb.jp

post-5342-0-76452100-1340843904_thumb.jp

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