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About This Club

For people who create woodworking content.

  1. What's new in this club
  2. I think the point is it would last a long time, longer than any of us.
  3. I call BS. Today's scientists can't even prove that ANYTHING has existed for that long, much less existed in an unchaged form.
  4. Maybe this will replace dvds and blu-ray? https://www.theverge.com/2016/2/16/11018018/5d-data-storage-glass
  5. I didn't mean just free storage sites, there are a lot of shady sites like the ones that offer free prints ect. Fun fact Betty White is older than sliced bread.
  6. I've got 3 fileing cabinets that were made for storing rows of punch cards. Great for hardware now but they were brutally heavy to get up the stairs to put them in the loft.
  7. Nobody wants to see my naked ass.....
  8. To proved it, stash a few naked pics on your "free" storage account and see how long it takes for them to appear on Facebook. Use a stopwatch....
  9. Ha! I remember working with reel to reel, paper punch tape, and punch cards. 8" Floppy disks were the best thing since bread. (before we learned to slice it) My phone camera now takes pictures bigger than the capacity of the entire disk array connected to the CAD system I serviced in my previous job.
  10. Oh, I'm sure they're using it, why else is it free? For the pay accounts like AWS or Dropbox they better not use my data if I'm paying them for storage. With cloud storage sites like AWS you can set up the file structure the way you want it. It's basically just a remote drive you can access. BTW, I try to encrypt everything I store remotely then only I can use it.
  11. Maybe all of these online offerings are ok for a backup as long as they aren't trying to sell my pictures ect. The trouble with them is their organization sucks and you can kind of change it but there is no way to set the defaults. I want it to sort using my folder structure but alas they can't do that for some reason. It does in the drive but not the photo area. If you think websites won't try and use your data to make money your probably wrong. If they are offering a free service, you are the product, and your data will be used to make them money.
  12. I know your probably already invested in Canon. If you open to new systems the Lumix GH5/GH4 I've been told is one powerhouse of a camera. A friend of mine that does video product loves the GH4. I don't know how much record time you typically need but i believe DSLRs are always going to have a record limit to them where as camcorders won't. In the canon system they have their EOS 300 or 500 cameras that use SLR lenses but offer more of the camcorder controls. If money isn't an issue camcorders of similar sensor size are going to offer better controls and better video features but will be more expensive. Quality is fully dependent on sensor size not the shape of the body or the buttons on the out side. From the same sensor generation a 35mm sensor is always going to offer better image quality over a crop sensor.
  13. I am on the budget end of things. I use a Lumix FZ150 point and shoot. I get results I am happy with and I like that I can save custom settings into it for my lighting requirements. Having a "super zoom" with a single lens means one less connection area where dust can get into. Previous to this, I used a Canon S100 pocket point and shoot that I bought for my wife.
  14. Even though DVDs and CDs degrade over time (so do HHD) they are still considered the best long term storage. And, yes obsolete media is a problem,. Anybody remember Zip disks and drives? DVDs is a good bet atm since blu-ray players can read DVDs and CDs. There's some talk about what's next after blu-ray but not solid so I think they (blu-ray) will be around for a while still. What might kill blu-ray is cloud storage and streaming video. External dvd and blu-ray players are cheap enough that you can buy one and store it for later. We still have a working VHS. Article about storage mediums: https://www.pcworld.com/article/2984597/storage/hard-core-data-preservation-the-best-media-and-methods-for-archiving-your-data.html
  15. Ahh! This looks like a Google Photo competitor. I just logged into my account and I have almost 1000 photos there from two years ago. I don't remember putting them there, but I have an Amazon sponsored phone so I'm wondering if the phone backed them up from my camera/gallery app?
  16. I didn't write the article but yeah the 321 method is what i do and it really only works a swell as the guy that is doing it. The big thing is to keep up with what ever strategy you use. I think i might start taking advantage of amazon's unlimited photo storage offer.
  17. For stuff I consider fairly important, I copy it to every hard disk in the house. And maybe a USB stick or two. I use an external disk to hold large data files (read that as video footage), but once it goes to Youtube, I don't worry much about the raw footage. One thing I know - you can't trust electronic media to be a permanent static backup. Keep rotating through whatever storage media you choose, because as sure as you stash one away for long-term, THAT will be the one that fails or becomes obsolete. How many of you have family photos burned to DVD and stashed in a "safe place"? And now have a new computer that has no optical drive?
  18. So I feel like I have some experience in this field (notice I didn't say expertise lol). I started recording podcast back in 2006 and after some success decided to stop, I just didn't have the time. I still record, I record all my lectures for student use, but I don't publish them publicly. I'm also a computer science professor, I try to keep current with technology, I lecture over it, and I love gadgets. With that said everybody who has data they want to protect, from production content to family photos should practice the 3, 2, 1 rule: 3 copies, 2 local but on different devices and 1 off-site. I have heard so many horror stories of people who have lost irreplaceable data, it would keep you up at night. Currently, Amazon has a pretty cheap backup with their AWS service if you just want to have deep storage, not something you frequently access. A 4 tb hard drive is also cheap, under $100, which will hold quite a bit of data. There are lots of options these days. Backblaze, a cloud storage company, has an article about the 321 strategy: https://www.backblaze.com/blog/the-3-2-1-backup-strategy/ LOL I should have read your post first. you basically said everything I did.
  19. @legenddc I really don't like hybrid vehicles, i think they are silly complicated things that don't offer any benefit over a regular gas engine. He has an Instagram post of a box full of tapes he shot on his camcorder. His stuff seems tame compared to a friend of mine that goes over the top with everything. He keeps all unedited footage he has ever shot by tossing the data on WD red drives writing on the front what they are for and keeping them in an offsite safe. I think he's close to filling a large gun safe with drives.
  20. @Chestnut Just finished that article. Hybrid woodworking and hybrid file organization? I think you might be addicted to hybrid things...
  21. Marc prolly owns a ton of LaCie stuff for his backups
  22. Ouch, Yeah I'd love to move away form spinning rust altogether drive failure on solid state is a lot less frequent. I have a 1TB SSD on my main rig but #$(& that thing was $500 when i bought it. So it'll be a while till prices come down but the world will be a better place once they do.
  23. She lost hours of footage from multiple cameras and a drone for a big part of the build. I think it was the framing or rafter part. Had it all on one external, which broke, and then spent quite a bit of time trying to recover it, have it recovered and recover some files from the SD cards. All that and what was recovered caused issues with editing. Looking back, I'm sure she's kicking herself for not having better backups. I can't imagine what Marc does with 10+ years of footage and some of it in 4k.
  24. Yeah, pretty much that. It will optimize backups when your backup media is running out of space, or even consolidate old backups, according to user configurations. It has a pretty sleek user interface, you can navigate back in time using a time machine paradigm.
  25. Ahh so like a windows restore that actually works. Yeah i'd still do the file migration the manual way, saves drive space by not backing up unnecessary files.
  26. Time Machine backups everything (unless you exclude files or folders) and keeps all the versions of your files. You can boot your Mac from a Time Machine backup in the event of total failure. And it's completely automated, you don't need to remember to drag and drop anything. It's part of Mac OS and it's been out there for a long time.
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