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    • That’s a neat idea. The only downside I see is that you are sanding against the grain on the rails but the ros should clear that up. 
    • I built 4 doors  for a cabinet I'm building my daughter I wasn't happy with the unevenness after gluing them up yesterday. I didn't want to use my orbital sander so I thought I'd run them through my drum sander, trying to hold the over hanging frame level was harder than I imagined and, was making my problems worse so I got PO'd and quit for the night. I woke up this morning with the solution, a plywood sled to carry the doors through the drum sander I used some scrap from building the doors and attached them with some pin nails to the plywood I cut for the sled  the middle one keeps the door level as  the drum goes over the styles which was where my problem was last night. Now the door are level and, a consistent thickness this worked great.  
    • I made several of these using an Ikea lamp.  I use 3 or 4 at a time at the lathe for multi-directional lighting.  Unfortunately Ikea discontinued these, but they may be available on Amazon.   I went through several versions before settling on this.  Quick tips if interested.  Remove the bottom rubber jaw pad.  Screw cup magnets through the lower jaw into a bit of plywood.  Place a loose piece of wood in the jaws to direct the goose neck up rather than forward.  You can still use as clamp.  With good magnets it holds well to a vertical surface.  My friend made this fixture from a HF magnetic base and another now discontinued Ikea lamp.  His has a much longer goose neck. On the store bought front I got these from Woodcraft (on sale about $20-25 each).  They are good, but I find the Ikea lamps provide a more uniform flood pattern and a more pleasing color temp.  (I hate blue LED lights--makes me feel like I need to put on a hat and scarf).  
    • With the huge surface area of long rain glue joint you could get away with wood glue here. These joints will see minimal stress so you don't really need to have 100% of the surface area covered in glue. That said if you are buying an epoxy there is a significant cost involved (~$200) and the volume a bulk buy can save you is tremendous. My West system gallon of resin has lasted me MANY years and per volume is FAR FAR cheaper than the 5 min stuff from box stores with a MUCH higher quality. Consider not the epoxy for this specific case but the best epoxy for all you current and possible future needs. For reference West system gallon kit is 168.8 oz of epoxy for $190 ($1.125/oz) a 5 min at $5 for 0.85 oz is $5.88/oz. I use epoxy for complicated long open time glue ups crack filling, knot filling, defect filling fixing kitchen utensils attaching knife scales to blanks casting applications sealing the end grain of furniture legs (which can act as furniture slides for chairs or protect outdoor furniture) With that list in mind i decided on West System with the 207 Hardner. It has equal strength to all the other high quality epoxies but has the benefit of being used for applications where it's clarity is appreciated. There are other clear options from other manufactures so I'm not exactly suggesting West System I'm suggesting getting the system that focus on a clear result. This allows the flexibility for doing castings and fillings. Leaves tinting open but also allows for the addition of fillers like Don mentioned above. The 207 has a good 45 min open time. The down side is the temperature requirements. That said if you  find yourself needing low temp grab a different hardener in a small size that works with lower temperatures.
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