SouthWest US

Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas.

22 topics in this forum

  1. Texas woodworkers? 1 2

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  2. Wood in AZ

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  3. San Diego woodworkers?

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  4. A class in texas

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  5. Hardwood

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  6. Hey guys

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  7. NM guy in Cali.

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  8. Air Dried Pecan

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    • Furniture just got more expensive an hour south of me.    http://www.inkfreenews.com/2020/02/28/fire-strikes-pallet-company-in-warsaw/
    • Quick update:  over the past several days, I have had a few minutes here and there to work on this project. Progress so far includes roughing out the tabletop support braces:   ... and calculating the cut angles for the base staves:   I am currently in the process of cutting 24 stave blanks to uniform dimensions, so I can use a pair of jigs (sleds, really) to form the tapered, angled cuts.  Doing this with machines, rather than the old-fashioned, hand tool way, means that starting with completely uniform parts is critical.  Transferring the angle is critical, too. Any error will be multiplied 24 times, so pucker factor is high.... In the image above, the circles represent the ID + wall thickness of the large and small ends of the cone. The angle remains the same along the edge of each stave, but the width changes. Using a drawing like this makes it simple to transfer the angles and dimensions using gauges and dividers, much more accurate than reading lines on a ruler.    
    • You're rolling!  The sash job, that I started over six months ago (can't remember when it was really), is still at this stage.  Not a stick has moved since then.  I got sidetracked, which is not unusual.  Those computer parts, in the background, are still there too, as well as a bunch of unopened tools still in boxes added since that picture was taken.  
    • It was a new house. The only thing that really sucked was the jointer. I guess plywood is a PITA but i don't use it all that much and when i do I break it down in the garage. Moving stuff in sucks yes, but my shop is 64 degrees year round, has 9 foot ceilings, and full plumbing. Some day we might put an addition on the house. At that time i'll add on to my shop and put in a man door or something that goes strait, and to the garage or something.
    • I went to use one of my bessey clamps a couple days ago, and suddenly my shelf was not sitting square and tight in my case. Took the shelf out, fiddled a bit, and then the gap was on the opposite corner! (I had ended up reversing the orientation of the clamp) Mine was out of square by about the same amount shown in OP’s pic. Grabbed another off my wall and it was correct- just slightly out of square in the opposite direction. I was in HD yesterday and took one of their nicer speed squares over to the clamps and one of the four 24” clamps they had on the shelf was like this. I’ll be sure to check them before I buy them in the future. 
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