SouthWest US

Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas.

22 topics in this forum

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  1. San Diego woodworkers?

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  2. NM guy in Cali.

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  3. Hey guys

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  4. Wood in AZ

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  5. Hardwood

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  6. Texas woodworkers? 1 2

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  7. Air Dried Pecan

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  8. A class in texas

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    • I agree with @drzaius, if you don't want a high-gloss finish, there is really no reason to fill the pores. Since I have no spray gear, I stick with wiping poly for furniture that sees real use, and with great success. A bit of patience during application can net you a smooth, clear, beautiful finish, with protection that no curing oil can match.
    • Back in the shop today. Ive been working on a black walnut root ball sourced locally and Ive rough turned and cored five bowls out of that root ball of varying sizes. This is an example of the color and grain I found. After shaking the sawdust out I mounted up a curly maple platter from a scrap Ricky gave me. I have the shaping done and sanded to 120 and a coat Of sanding sealer. Thats enough for the day.  
    • I think it would be a shame to use pore filler, which flattens the surface & hides the beautiful grain texture of that wood. If the wood has is very open pored, like red oak (you could lose pens & paper clips in those pores), then there is good reason justification for filling. Most finishes are available in various sheens from glass like all the way to flat. You certainly can't argue with Chet's schedule; the results are spectactular, but you need spraying equipment for that. Curing oils are easy to apply and look great, but don't offer a lot of protection, especially for a desk or table top. Wiping poly is super easy to apply and give goods protection.
    • Hey guys, I work at a leading TV production company. I'm interested in learning more about the professional woodworking and carpentry spaces, especially family run businesses. If you or anyone you know of would be willing to chat, send me a message here or email at sabs2394@gmail.com. Thank you! 
    • That's an easy one: what ever you're thinking make it bigger . Seriously, it depends on what you make and how.  If you strictly make jewelry boxes and only use hand tools' then you'll need less space than if you produce matching bedroom sets using a full scale CNC. I think that 16 x 24 would not be an overly large sized place for a shop with very many stationary tools.  For that arrangement I'd want the equivalence of a two car garrage--and if I could have a three car I'd promise never to complain about shop space again.
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