The Shop


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    • I pity the poor fella that has to remove these, 75 years from now! Looking good! 
    • If I had to rely on my hand planing skills to get a straight edge, all of my builds would have live edges. Nice job @h3nry! 
    • Well, you all know how it starts ... deciding which board get used for which parts ...then lots of milling ... Jointing was pretty easy, these boards were all pretty straight and square to start with. Ripping was somewhat less work this time thanks to the new bandsaw ... but my trusty old Disston feels a bit betrayed. finally, since the bandsaw doesn't leave a finish cut, I still had to mark a line amd plane down to it to get all the parts to width ... That should be enough wood for most of the carcasse ... next to cut these boards down to individual parts.
    • At 4:00 it was still a little softer than ideal, but stiff enough so it wouldn't re-bond to something if broken loose, so I raked the joints.  It's better not to try to wipe all the broken loose mortar off until tomorrow.  If I wiped it with a sponge or anything, it would make another mess.  It will clean right up in the morning.  It took about 20 minutes to clean out the first row.  It would have gone faster but I didn't figure out until close to the end that the back of the plastic knives were just the right thickness to rake the joint in one pass. This is much like laying stone.  You wait until the end of the day to rake the joints if you want a recessed joint. I rubbed the cut edge of the old floor tile with a carborundum stone before I started laying the tile this morning, so there would not be a sharp edge there for bare feet on that side of the grout joint.  The new tile is exactly flush with the top of the old floor, and tapers down from there to the drain. Drops of water are from rinsing off the knives, but with the mortar this soft I found it better to just use a bunch of knives while they were dry and dropped them in the cleaning bucket.  They all rinsed off after I was finished and will be reused again.  These 1,000 will be more than a lifetime supply for me but are the best I've ever used, so I'm glad I bought them.  51 years into doing this type of thing now, and I'm still learning.
    • That was my point. I had trouble clamping at the curved top, until I took a cutoff from one of the curves, and used it as a clamping block. But, I can see a couple 1/2 curves could be used in lots of different situations.
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