Product Reviews

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  2. New shop floor

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  3. Rikon 10-326 Review 1 2 3

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    • I do love me some mesquite!  Mesquite is not the easiest wood to work with, but it's worth the extra effort, IMO. It's high in mineral content which makes it very abrasive to tools. Here's a good write up about the lumber. One thing I will say is that I LOVE the smell in my shop after milling it. Bear in mind that it's roughly twice as hard as red oak, so carbide tooling is very highly recommended. It also has a great deal of color variation, so matching boards can be a challenge. When finished with oil to bring out the figure it's on par with many exotics, and priced accordingly. I'm a west Texas oil trash guy and grew up with it, so I have a real appreciation for finding something beautiful in such an otherwise desolate landscape. When people ask about the projects I've made with it they're shocked, to a person, when I tell them it's mesquite. I get the bulk of mine from Faifer & Co. outside San Antonio, TX.  Here are a few of the pieces I've used mesquite in. Floating top table Cutting board with turquoise Medicine cabinet  Our kitchen cabinet fronts. Cherry frames. Large charcuterie board for Alison's niece. Black palm feet. Morris chair. Rookhee campaign chair.   Just realized I may have a problem...
    • I'd like to see pictures of the house, and barn. It might be the wood is worth more in those structures, than sold as reclaimed wood.  The board looks like some type of softwood to me.  Some of it is really dense, and heavy, but I know nothing of what grows there.
    • That board doesn't look like oak to me but it's hard to tell. The fastest method is smell. When cutting the wood there is a very obvious difference between them. Good clean end grain pictures are the most accurate. As far as value it all depends on if you can find the right buyer. Also how clean you can get the boards would be a big factor as well. If they are caked in dirt and full of nails not many people will want to buy.
    • Yea, you want to sand the end grain to at least 150 grit maybe 180 then take as cost as you can picture but still have it in good clear focus.
    • Thank you both - I'll try to get some better pics. I know it's not pine...and it's fairly heavy and very dense. I took down another piece, from the actually flooring in the 2nd floor of the barn - 17' long, that was fun! lol - and I'm going to clean it up a bit and see if I can get some pics of that too. So - I should take that piece I have and sand the end down? That won't make it harder to identify? Like I said, I have tons of the stuff so I'm game - just want to make sure I'm doing it right!  
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