Product Reviews

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    • Work flow involves a lot of personal preference. I am facing a similar situation, but with different tools. Your layout looks reasonable to me. I might consider rotating the workbench 90 degrees and moving the item marked 'rabot' next to it to allow more walkway between the saw and jointer.
    • Yes Coop, it's a deep chair. I think it wouldn't be too hard to move the backrest forward, it would just be changing the location of 2 cuts. The other thing is they are very wide, much wider than the Low Back. That may not be a big problem, but could be if you have a desk with limited leg/knee/foot space. Changing the width is more difficult as you would need to change the pattern.  If you want any measurements of the final chair just ask, I'll get them for you.  Submitted and they are now posted on the guild site.
    • hello, I am working on building a workshop, it will have a 5.6*4.6m (17*14ft) inside dimensions... My "problem" is trying trying to place the various items in the shop (which I need to do ahead of time as I want to bury power and dust collection pipes)... Since I am at the design phase, I can do prety much what I want, which is nice! however, I have a hard time thinking how to organize the various items... Hence asking for help here!!!! I need to place the following items (by order of most to least used): Rigid table saw: 160*100cm tool box: 50*70cm planer: 70*100 6" jointer (110*60cm) band saw: 60*50cm lathe: 160*50cm I also have a bench (70*180cm), BUT I am willing to change/recreate it as needed. for example to transform it into a combination bench/outfeed table for the bandsaw... I woudl also like to find a way to use the 'door' to cut and plane longer boards... But I have not found a good solution without using a large garage door... I have a slew of smaller bench tools, but these will most likely sit on woodshop long benches/cabinets on the wall sides. Simillary, the jointer (which I seldom use) is planned to be on the side and brought forward when needed) I plan to do a lot of wood storage on the outside, I will also place the dust collection outside. Any advices? proposal? Thanks, Cyrille
    • Beautiful job bud! Does the back set back as far as the Maloof Low Back? I’d like to have one of these for my desk chair but prefer a more upright than the low back. 
    • Unfortunately, FreeCAD development and education material for it haven't grown hand-in-hand. The 'official' source for information seems to be at FreeCADweb.org Regarding the 'freeness' of Fusion360: while you may obtain a no-cost educational license by claiming to be an educator, the program is most certainly not 'free'. Autodesk can require a paid license or subscription at any time. Much as Trimble did with Sketchup, users may one day find themselves stuck with a cloud-only, limited feature version, or none at all. For home & hobby users, this is my biggest arguement for learning FreeCAD. Check the license for it here  to see the difference. Also, FreeCAD places more emphasis on function over eye-candy, so it rins smoother on older / less powerful computers. That said, its still hard to wrap one's brain around. But parametric modeling has abilities far beyond drag and drop. Consider that dimensions of a part can be dependant on one another. Say a table leg, straight, tapered or curved, has its width & breadth dependant on its length by some ratio or formula, and restricted by limits you define. Simply changing the length rescales the entire part accordingly. I'm sure other cad apps do this, but when I moved from Sketchup, this was a real eye-opener.
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