Product Reviews


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  1. Festool ETS 150/3

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  2. Kinex Squares

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  3. DeWalt Flexvolt

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  4. Pin Nailers 1 2

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  5. Beading tools

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  6. SawStop T-Square fence

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  7. Milwaukee's OneKey...

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    • Dennis, like to many things, it depends on what you want to do with it. I've recently started putting up a cleat system. (one of the reasons it's so messy). I put 2½" cleats on the wall spaced 6½" apart (bottom to bottom). I thought that it would give me lots of options, but it seems that I have ended up putting things on only a couple of the heights. I'm still working on it and have changed things 3 times this week alone. Only one main "rule" to follow. If you are putting something fairly heavy or unbalanced on a cleat, make sure that the holder is supported on either another cleat or use a spacer block so that it sits against the wall. This will help make sure that it doesn't pull up and out of the cleat. One good thing about a cleat system is that you can start with only a couple of "lines" and add more in between if your needs change.
    • Tool recommendation of the day. At the beginning of this project I picked up 2 new sawblades from Ridge Carbide. One was a flat top blade ground for a dovetail angle, nice but what can you say? The other is their 10" 48 tooth TS2000 Ultra Combo blade. WOW, this thing really cuts cleanly. The 21" crosscuts on the top panel was flawless. It'll also cut plywood with zero chip out on the bottom and the cut is polished. Anyway, just thought I'd pass that along. Expensive but they really perform.
    • This week I decided it was time to make a couple upgrades to my existing tool. First I replaced my 1950's Craftsman jointer with a new Grizzly 6" jointer. Then I I upgraded my crappy HF 8" drill press with a new 12" Grizzly drill press.  I decided to mount it to my large Husky too box.   To do this I had to move my spindle sander to my small Husky tool box. This is where I had my old drill press mounted. I originally put the new one on it but I decided it felt to unstable.      
    • The top is done, I had a bit of a drum sander incident. When you hear a tic-tic sound evidently it is a sign your paper is about wore out . When it did wear out I wound up with a pretty significant burnt gouge on one side of the top. Anyway, changed to 120 grit and sanded a bit further than I was planning to to remove the damage. The top is now .71 inches instead of .75. Gentle rounding off still to come... Also glued the stock for the cove to a carrier board to make the routing a little safer and sanded to 5/8 thick. This molding will make the transition from the base to the case.
    • No rule of thumb on this one.  Some folks go with a wall full of horizontal cleats every 6-8 inches. This lets you put small fixtures in place with a high degree of flexibility.  I make larger fixtures that have small items in them.  These pics are from the temp shop currently in use.  The cleats were one of the first things to go up. I find 3 or 4 long cleats at heights that hang at the "right" height work best for me.  The "right" height for me is not so high I can't reach my long clamps and not so low that the lower fixture hits the ground.  In between things should hang from one cleat and rest against the next one or two down.  I don't bother with cutouts for the cabinets to set flush. This would kill my flexibility with this system.  I need to be able hang most things most places as I change things . . . like my mind Here's one iteration of the old shop: In the end it seems you could decide on Lots-o-Cleats: Or a few cleats and then design your fixtures from there.  
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