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    • Kind of taking away from the art but, we’ve been down the CNC road before. I guess it really, in this case, depends on the sounds and those that can appreciate and play them. 
    • Step 3 of my reorganization required me to make a new cart for my planer that has storage in it to hold the setting gauge and spare blades for the planner. My planner is a Delta 22-650 13" 2 HP cast iron planer that they sold as a "benchtop" planer, but it is a seriously heavy beast that does a very good job of planing. I bought the planer back around 1982. The choices back then were this planer, the original Makita bench top unit or big floor mount planers that cost a bundle, even for a 12" planer. So I went with this one and haven't regretted it. Someday, I am going to fit it with a helical head. My original stand for it was built out of 2x4 stock and actually was pretty good, except for two issues. One, it was too short. I had to bend down to run something through it, which got hard on my back after awhile, especially if it was heavy 8/4 stock. Two, it didn't have any storage and the way I made it, which, while really sturdy, wasn't conducive to adding drawers  big enough to handle knives and such. Because this planer is so heavy, I decided to make it out of hard maple, with mortise and tenon joinery. The casters I picked up for it are 6" urethane units rated at 375 lbs each, which gives a total of 1500 lbs - serious overkill, but they would allow the stand to roll over obstacles in my shop without tipping the stand over or the wheels going flat from standing in one place over time. The only bad part is that they don't lock, so I will have to use wheel chocks, especially if I move it into my driveway. It is on a slant and more than once I have had to chase a tool when it started rolling on its own. I started with a base made from 4" wide 8/4 stock with half lap joints at the corners. With the casters clamping though the joints and plenty of glue, the joints aren't going to fail. I routed the mortises for the uprights and got a reminder which way the bit drags the router on the first one. I usually use a hollow chisel mortiser, but didn't have a big enough chisel and bit. I also drilled the holes for the casters, as one of the bolts would be under one of the uprights and needed to be installed before glue-up. I also fabricated the upper ring in a similar fashion. Next I cut the tenons on the uprights on my tablesaw and fit them to the mortises. The uprights are a bit of overkill, but I wanted to make sure they didn't rack. With the large tenons and the extra width and thickness of the uprights, they should be plenty strong. Fin Finally, I glued the base together and  bolted the casters in place . The last step in fabricating the stand was to install the drawers and bottom. I chose to install two drawers (not that much to store for a planer!). I enclosed the sides and back with gray 3/4" melamine MDF to match my other cabinets and the planer. I fab'ed two drawers from 1/2" baltic birch sides and 1/4" baltic birch bottoms. Butt joints and brads were my exotic joinery for the drawers. The drawer fronts are screwed on and I added the two pulls that match the rest of my cabinets. Three coats of Sealcoat shellac sprayed from a can I wanted to get rid of finished the maple parts. That completed the stand. In this picture, you can see my planer on the old stand in the background. The last and hardest step was to get the planer bolted on top. I got my son and grandson to help me lift it on. That planer has to weight something like 250 lbs! It is a back buster. We set it on the stand. I removed the drawers and reached under to mark the bolt hole locations, then rotated the planer 45 degrees so I could drill the holes. There was no way I was going to remove and replace that beast. After twisting the planer back in place, I installed the bolts and that finished that up. The bed of the planer ended up at about 30" from the floor, which is just about where I wanted it. It is oriented the way it is so that I will be able to get into the drawers when it is in its final location. I had to clean the planer up. A couple of years of sitting behind a lumber pile, plus some visits from the resident mouse family left it covered in dust and the cast iron table with a thin film of rust. I wiped everything down with mineral spirits. I decided to try some CRC 3-36 that Fine Woodworking recommended as a rust preventative from one of their tests. Turns out that Home Depot carries it. It is also a penetrating lube, so I sprayed the table down with it and remove the rust film and spots with some Scotchbrite pads and resprayed with the CRC lube. Worked well for that part and I haven't seen any signs of rust on it since. If you look on the left side of the planer, you will see a chip collection gadget I fab'ed up. This planer didn't come with a dust scoop and by the time I had a dust collector, they no longer sold them, so I made this out of 1/2" baltic birch scraps. \When I first built it, the hose came straight out of it and, while it worked pretty well, I was always fighting with the hose. So I changed out the hose fitting with a flanged elbow and that solved the problem. It's not very pretty, but it works pretty well, only missing a tiny bit from each board. One thing that I really don't like about my current shop is that I have to unbury the jointer and planer to use them, so I tend to not use them very much. I have this good gear, but because it is such a pain to get it out, I tend to not bother. With the new shop layout, both will have a permanent place and will be connected to the dust system. Since I have an automatic starter for my DC that turns it on anytime I start a dust producing power tool, all I'll have to do is open the blast gate to use a tool. I intend to locate the gates so they are easy to get to. If anyone wants to see how the automatic start gadget is connected and how it works, check out the August, 2000 issue of Fine Woodworking, page 66. It paid for my dust collection system. Next up are some storage improvements. Thanks for following this.
    • Those areas were not noticable prior to stripping and sanding? If the former finish was dark, I would bet on that simply being old stain that penetrated the wood more. Keep sanding.
    • What we often call eastern red cedar is actuallya member of the juniper family. As such the young tree is quite flexible, and is often able to heal itself after some trauma bends and tears the wood fibers. This can sometimes result in a tree with severe deformities, but to me, that looks like a root section, perhaps a crotch where one root grew straight, with another wrapping around it.
    • Closets are often used to minimize the noise from those machines, just beware of the airflow needed to let them work correctly and keep the motors cool. And buy a bigger dust collection system than you think you need, because you will. Consider the flow / volume and pressure requirements for any pneumatic tools very catefully. A small 'pancake' air compressor may suffice to operate a brad nailer, but air sanders and die grinders require a much larger system.
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