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    • Coop, you know SPF 2x4s are about as hard as rigid foam insulation. I used bondo and spot putty to smooth dents, scratches and cracks all over this thing. Here is a shot before the paint.  
    • NIvley done.  I like it.
    • Loved the pic Dave. It reminds of simpler times in our nation when I listened to the baseball game on the radio with my girlfriend and family holding a frosty one waiting for the fireworks. Yea baby. Happy 4th y'all.
    • Hi wtnhighlander: Thank you for ur response. Perhaps this might be of interest to some of your members. I love trying working with new materials and branching out from wood working such as welding and in this case stone. To answer your question the stone I used is a slate which is VERY hard . . . don't know the hardness scale  . . . but I went through 5  diamond disks cutting and shaping the stone mosaic. I also bought an air driven wet polisher for stone around 250.00. . . It is much like any 5 " angle grinder BUT THIS ONE FEEDS WATER CONTINUOUSLY TO WHERE YOUR WORK IS. . . . 4 or 5" discs are driven by air and a water feed hose which passes through the grinder and feeds onto the surface you are grinding RIGHT IN THE MIDDLE OF THE ARBOUR WHERE YOU TIGHTEN THE DIAMOND DISKS OR SANDIING DISKS The machine didn't come with a guard like most grinders . . . so I took an old guard that I had from a burnt out grinder . . . modified it and fed the water line to a whole in the guard so as to feed directly onto the outside of diamond CUTTING WHEEL . . . This keeps the diamond cool so it can better cut the stone and also makes it totally dust free. If I didn't do that the diamonds ware away WAY TO FAST  and I would be breathing I a cloud of dust.  I also have an old 10" Target water saw that I did a rock wall with the help of some super qualified stone masons who taught me an awful lot. On the project above I was after a certain look which is looking into a clear water stream or lake in where you can make out the three dimensions under water. I also just wanted to play around with the metallic colours that you can do with the epoxy , A HEAT GUN AND A TORCH. I got a little carried away with the colour on the first pour  of the sink countertop and lost some of the perception of depth but it still turned out awesome non the less. BTW there is a stainless steel UNDER - MOUNT sink in there that is totally encapsulated in place by epoxy. Kinda cool when you see how I did it. Pics are a thousand words. Quite the formwork to dot it. EVERYTHING HAS TO BE LEAK PROOF  until the epoxy sets On the Table Top I did something I mixed up about a gallon of the PE-100 standard epoxy ( not deep cast).see the 3 rd. picture above  After a 16 hour set time I mixed another 6 gallon deep cast pour OF CLEAR. see the 4th. picture above As with all projects it is about the endless prep work   In The pictures so far  it is difficult to see what I am talking about. the plastic hoarding around the pieces is to keep the pieces free of dust floating around in the room. I will share some other pics later to help you  better see it but there is 1/4" of epoxy covering the stone. Epoxy can be used as a glue as we all know in wood working. But in this case it IS NOT SO MUCH AS A GLUE . . . BUT A MATERIAL TO COMPLETLY ENCAPSULATE. Pardon the rambling on but the stone is back set from the edges of the forms to enable routing ONLY EPOXY AND NOT STONE. Also at top of the epoxy a meniscus is formed wherever epoxy  touches a form wall and that is why it needs to be routed ROUND OVER. Any way thanks for reading I will post more pics as the work continues. best rgards, Martin  
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