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    • Been to all those myself and well worth it.  Pima Air museum was the last thing I did with my dad before he passed.
    • When I was in Tucson several years ago, we bought 3fer tickets to the DM bone yard, the excellent Pima air and space museum, and a Titan missile silo. I don't remember how much they were, but it was a bargain. The Titan silo was an especially profound experience.
    • I love that room! For myself though, we have more of a multi-purpose room for the serious TV watching, with exercise equipment, piano, games etc. But I do have some serious AV in there. My wife was away for a few days getting herself a shiny new knew, so I was able to have my way with the volume control  and enjoyed several hours of music & movies at unseemly levels of sound.  One of the neighbors was over last night for a visit & said that sitting in her living room, she could feel her sternum vibrating. I do have limited sound proofing, but not like you, Paul, so I turn the sound way down after 9:00. What kind of professional design help did you get for the project?
    • I saw this used once, and once only, on site back in the 1970s in the attic of an old manor house. All the rafters and joists had moved over the centuries since it was built, so there were no real reference surfaces or edges. The chippy who used it cut the whole thing with his axe from a piece of scrap, very quickly. After it had served its purpose it was discarded, but I remember being impressed with how well it worked. I thought at the time that "I must remember that" but I have never had occasion to use the technique myself. It is filed away at the back of my brain under "could be useful some day".
    • We get a chance to think it through but these things were probably originally made on site with a handsaw and pocket knife and in a matter of minutes while standing up on scaffolding.
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