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  2. RichardA

    Photography

    The Wart Hog is without doubt, the scarriest weapon an enemy has ever seen.
  3. Whats your thoughts on this one? record power sabre-450 18 bandsaw
  4. Today
  5. Hello Terry, Thank you for your reply. I have a pretty large workshop with single and three phase power, so that wouldnt be an issues. I am looking to resaw in the near future, this is why im looking for a larger more stable model. The circles im cutting are pretty temporary, so i doont mind changing the blade. The head room is about 6 meters so its not an issue either. I was keen on the Hammer N3800 but then i found out the delivery charge was £420! So i think im back to looking at Axminster. Im not really interesting in old models and refurbishing, im just looking for a brand thats made well and not over priced, i cant stand machines where the fence doesnt lock firmly in place, like my Axminster Trade AT310SPT Spiral Planer Thicknesser. This is the reason im unsure about Axminster.
  6. I like it, I like it. Very nice job. The center of the headboard is an interesting choice. Was that your own variation on the theme? Great material choices. Just a side note in case it’s of interest. The Greens did the beautiful design work but IIRC the Halls brought many of the designs to life. This collaboration of designers and builders left behind some pretty amazing work.
  7. Coop

    Photography

    The Wart Hog is my favorite! Great pics.
  8. You might want to look for a lab grade pump used if possible like the one here I sold recently. It’s only 1.5cfm but will draw darn near 30” of vacuum and is duty rated to run nonstop for 14 days.
  9. Tpt life

    Photography

    Under the pattern at Davis-Monthan. My favorites are not my best, just favorites.
  10. Unlike a good book, knowing how the story ends at the first, did not take away from the story! Thanks Derek for a great read!
  11. Flipping the legs...filed away in the toolbox. Thanks.
  12. Thanks @Chip Sawdust, at first I thought it was a little “busy”, too much grain but in the end she is the wild child of the bunch and it fits her perfectly
  13. Thanks. I do have some of his books. I've not make the jig for the plugs, I like them to have a random handmade look, so I just crank them out by hand. I have a Powermatic morticer , so it wasn't too bad. And there are no spindles in the foot board. ;-)
  14. The legs I had meant to mention the way I dealt with the dowels, which were the original joinery for the legs, but there was not the opportunity. Here are the legs, and you can see the ugly dowels. What I did was to turn them upside down, and remove the dowelled section in the taper cut ... First, the legs were morticed .. I built a simple fixture for my sliding table saw ... The nail holes were filled with coloured epoxy, which disappeared after the finish was applied ... And then smoothed ... I was asked (when I posted this photo elsewhere) why I planed into the grain. The answer is ‘because I can with a closed chipbreaker’ No, the real answer is because it was easier to keep track of the mark demarcating the flat section. Regards from Perth Derek
  15. I did consider a drawer stop, but it was difficult to do with the drawer design. The drawer will hold a few light objects, such as keys, and I was not concerned about weight stressing it. Regards from Perth Derek
  16. Yesterday
  17. Wow that's really nice! I love the wrap-around grain, that's perfect. I have some Australian red gum but it's... just red. Not much figure in it and no streaking like that stuff. And it's really heavy, dense wood more like wenge dense and almost as hard to cut.
  18. I went the cheap and easy way and glued some MDF to a piece of 3/4" ply. It's flat, has endured for some years now, and does well enough. I always drool over better benches, but it does the trick so far and I have enough other things to make better that it's probably going to go for some years more. I used 4x4s for the legs as you can't beat them for sturdiness in easy-to-find sizes. I don't know anyone at a lumber yard But I highly recommend either bracing is sheet goods to aid against racking. The heaviest bench can still rack if it's not properly braced. I like using sheet goods for that. As for a bench below, what are your plans for that? Will you also put drawers in there?
  19. That looks really nice I really like what you did with the center piece in the headboard; wish I'd've thought of that when I made mine. I'm 6'5" and made a California king out of the queen plans (basically it's 6'x7'). Still used six spindles but made the center pieces wider. So I have the taller footboard but it doesn't bother me, although I did worry about it a bit while I was planning. My main wood was quartersawn white oak. Do you have the Darrell Peart books? I made his jig for rounding the ends of the ebony plugs. Worked well for me after a little guesswork. How did you do the double mortises? I did mine by hand (this was before the Powermatic) and it was a LOT of work.
  20. A friend of mine has the old "store receipt" style printer and I woulda gone with that but I'm a bit more modern than he is, and a bit more gadgety The first one I received had to go back to Caldwell because something inside rattled.
  21. Hopefully I have better luck with this one.
  22. Ahh, thanks. That was the info I was after.
  23. She heard all about it through her faculty advisor who is the same person that told us. She graduated from college in 1999.
  24. How long ago was back then. I find that uncovered stuff from the past can become pleasant and fun conversation. You might let your daughter know what you heard on the grapevine. There might be a few laughs...
  25. That is pretty fancy. When I got my chronograph, it was one of the first. It came with two IR sensors that you had to mount. Kludged up something with some 1 x 2 for scraps. Yours is a lot nicer. I'm jealous!
  26. I suppose you have already considered this, but I'd you have a reasonably sized air compressor, think about a venturi pump. I have one that came in a kit I bought from on of the online veneering sites. I think it was joewoodworker. Anyway, the kit cane with all of the fittings and electrical parts. I added a switch, cord, electrical box and a couple of pieces of 4" PVC pipe with end caps. It pulls down to 5" easily, which.is plenty good for veneering. The air runs for a few minutes as the bag is pulled down. Then it cycles.once every few minutes for a 20 seconds and shuts off again. Works like a champ. No oil or other maintenance. My compressor only cycles every few hours (60 gallon tank).
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