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  1. It's funny . . . . . . these machines don't seem nearly as big as they did in the old shop.
    13 points
  2. My 7 year old granddaughter was over today. She brought a stool kit that needed to be assembled for her day camp and as a requirement for her Cub Scout Wolf badge. So we dug into it. The supplied stretcher was too thick by about 30 thou, (yes, I use calipers for this), so I showed her how to use my #4 smoother to thin it down. She did pretty well controlling it. One of the top planks was missing, so Grandpa ripped up a new one. Myhrie glued and nailed everything together. It came out pretty nice. She wanted to paint it purple, but I didn't have that color in stock. It was a fun hour.
    12 points
  3. OK, it's been awhile, and my patience has finally paid off. My upholstery guy took the month of July off, and with the backlog of work he had to do I just got the couch back this week. So it's time to put a bow on this build. I like the fabric we picked, the cushions and couch look real clean and it sits very well. The MCM look is beginning to permeate my home, and this project will result in a few matching pieces for the room (love seat, coffee table, end tables). So here's the finally couch; Thanks for following along and I hope this was enjoyable to watch, I can say it was enjoyable to build.
    11 points
  4. It was a weekend for Labours of love. Saturday was hauling horses for my Daughter's last local show for the year. It was fun for me as it is normally my wife's department. The two of them are going on a big trip, taking in three shows in two weeks in September so I called dibs to take her this time. Sunday was bucking and splitting the last of this season's fire wood. We burn about 3 cords a winter and i like to have two years supply in the shed. This year a neighbour did some clearing and was kind enough to deck a bunch of alder and hemlock to give me at least two years supply. It's more than will fit in the shed so some will be stacked in the yard. Today was bee day, doing mite tests checking on stores and feeding them in preparation for winter. I really enjoy beekeeping but it is a lot like any other livestock or farming...lot's of work and investment in hopes of a good yeild but as many years of disappointment as years of plenty.
    11 points
  5. Well you might not get to 50 if you don't come up with some good story fast to explain why you have your arm around that college girl.
    10 points
  6. Just got back from our quick overnight trip to St. Paul. We had a good time at the gallery. It was great to see my piece on display with the others in the exhibition--still hard to believe. And yes we were wearing masks, just took them off for the photo.
    10 points
  7. Well, I'm happy to say that the piece shipped to St. Paul safely. My wife and I are going to drive up to St. Paul on Thursday Sept. 9 and we'll stay overnight. For those that may be in the area sometime between Sept 5 and Dec 30, here is the gallery's web page with the address and hours. OK, I admit it, I'm getting pretty excited. https://www.galleryofwoodart.org/
    10 points
  8. Finally Finished the Bench!!!! Now a three part finish of equal parts of spar varnish, thinner, and Boiled Linseed Oil. First project from the bench will be a new tool cabinet to fill the space in front of the bench so that my most used tools are right there at the bench at the ready! Just about burnt up this poor drill - drilling 24 holes through 4" hard maple
    9 points
  9. Back in May I posted a picture of two nightstands I had built for our Master bedroom. Recently I started the bed on this project, but it has been slow going for a few reasons. One - even in retirement I only spend 4 or 5 hours a day in the shop because there are other things like reading the paper and drinking coffee. Second - and more of an effect on this project is the size of it and the size of my shop. Building a king bed in a two car sized shop is a chore. At first I was thinking that I would build the foot board get it out of the way and then the head board. Then reality set in, first thing is there are two legs for the foot and two for the head board, also there are three raised panels on each and you are just asking for problems milling the foot board parts first and then trying to duplicate the set-ups when you start to work on the head board. Along with this there are stile and rail parts that are similar. This is a long way of saying I have parts stacked all over the shop and every time I want to us a tool there is something that needs to be moved. Needless to say this slows things down. I haven't been real diligent in my photo taking but here are some to catch you up. The first thing i did was a bent lamination for a piece that will be the top molding for the head board. I started here because I wanted to make the form, us it and then get it out of the way and out of the shop. I also want to use the finished molding to draw my shape on the panel that the molding will go on so they match up nicely. At the same time I started gluing up the legs. I used Poplar in the center and 4/4 sapele front and back. These are the foot board legs with the head board legs lurking in the background. This was the finished molding, it is a little over an inch square. Next I glued on a 1/8 inch thick veneer to hide the glue lines. Head board legs. Foot board legs. After this I worked on the raised panels, no work in process pictures just the final product. The end grain cove took a lot of hand sanding clear up to 400 to get it to look like the edge grain coving. I think they all came out pretty nice but I did give more attention to the head board panels (top) as far as matching up the grain to hide glue lines because when you walk into the room they will be more eye level. Each of the 6 panels is made up of three pieces. I am using floating tenons all around so next up I cut all my mortises in the foot board stiles and rails. The stiles were first using my mortising jig and a 3/8 up spiral bit. I cut them 1 1/2 inches deep. Now I don't want you all laughing at this next picture. The rails are 69 inches long and to cut the mortises in the ends I need to get my jig about 70 inches high. So I built a down and dirty platform 29 inches tall to clamp my jig to. I wasn't going to pay the current silly prices for some construction lumber ,but I did have a neighbor having their kitchen remodeled and I found a couple of scraps of 2 X 10 in his tear out pile that would work along with a couple of pieces of ply on my part. I had to stand on a stool. A bunch of tenon stock out of scraps. First dry fit of the footboard.
    9 points
  10. Project left the shop today, wrapped it in moving blankets, loaded on a hand truck and up 2 flights of stairs it went with a bit of wifely assistance. Few more trips up and down with drawers, internal parts, plus an impact driver and about 3 dozen brass screws for the back boards. 20 minutes of final assembly and I call this one done. Color looks a little different outside the shop, I've got those 5 or 6k bulbs in the shop.
    9 points
  11. Thanks guys. Yes that is an old car sub-woofer. It has been looking for a purpose in life ever since I got rid of the car it was installed in. It now provides the low, low end for the shop tunes. A little more progress this morning :-) Seems like a workbench out to be standing there… Oh yeah, that is where it goes. It’s taking so long I almost forgot :-)
    8 points
  12. Celebrated 49 years with this pretty girl yesterday, now what to do when the big 50 comes
    8 points
  13. Here is how you tote stuff when you can only lift 30 pounds at a time. I made progress on the wall next to the tool cabinet this morning.
    8 points
  14. Amen Coop. I did manage to get the cleats on the jig wall yesterday by using a variety of MacGyver methods. Due to all sorts of unexpected things, the appearance of COVID not the least of them, the new shop build has taken way longer than I could have ever expected. This means things have been moved around, moved again, and again. I have jigs in all sorts of places and will experience a Christmas-like effect as I stumble across them now that I am finally moving in. The point of all that is that this pic shows jigs that I will keep on this wall and others that are just for example as I do not use them regularly. I just threw up those that I could lay my hands on easily to demonstrate what I am trying to do here. This wall is perpendicular to the tablesaw and router table area.
    8 points
  15. made some caps for the legs. I started with some blocks 1 3/4" thick and the same width and depth as the legs. I set the table saw blade at 15° and cut the two short sides and then the two long sides, pushing a scrap behind them so I didn't get any digits tangled up in the saw blade. I took some lengths of scraps and made up some molding to go with the caps and also at the base of the legs. I there should be way more then needed of the three different moldings but I don't want to have to go back and recreate something at the last minute. Next thing up was to put a coat of shellac on the panels and the edges of all the stiles and rails before I start the glue ups. I put some blue tape on the edges where glue will be applied. The first part of the foot board glue up was the lower section that has the three panels. When that dried I added the horizontal panels and top rail to the bottom section. After that came out of the clamps I used a flush trim bit and straight edge to trim just a fuzz off of the edges so the legs will set perfectly flush with the panel section. I think it would have been fine but this extra step assures a nice fit and it removed a heavy 1/32 of an inch.
    8 points
  16. Been helping an Amish crew erect a post and beam barn on my farm.
    8 points
  17. Finished setting up my Incra 5000.
    8 points
  18. After hours of sanding, first coat of oil is on.
    8 points
  19. Got help to dolly the DP into the shop. the rest can be moved in small pieces so I'm good with that. One more piece of the puzzle done . . .
    7 points
  20. My Grandparents-in-law (is this a typically way to describe this?) live in an odd house that is slab on grade and concrete block walls. The doors that were installed when it was built are also odd. They are a very thin 3 panel door and do little to protect against cold winter weather. They requested a new door, initially i was going to look into a pre-hung and slide it in the existing opening. That was a no-go as the opening is an odd size and no standard available door will fit. Also it's concrete block with no room to expand the opening. So being a good grandson by marriage, I offered to make a new door to fit the opening. Chosen wood is Western Red Cedar. I can buy rough sawn from Menards, It's like Lowes or HD but green. If you don't have experience with the store they have an outdoor lumber yard that you can drive strait up to the pile and load from. It's a wonderful convenience not considering their prices are usually 11% lower . To get the door to the thickness i wanted. I ended up ripping 1_7/8" wide strips and edge gluing them together. The long stiles ended up being around 6.5" wide. I went a bit wider than normal to make sure the lock set would fit between the panel portions. It also made the panel dimensions easier to cut from the lumber lengths without huge waste. The rails were constructed in the same manner. Once all the rough material was glued, using tightbond 3 because exterior, I jointed and planed everything down. The finished thickness is 1_3/4" because that's what the window is calling for. After making everything strait and square i cut in grooves for the door panels. I did this at the table saw flipping the board so the panel is perfectly centered. I squared the grooves with a chisel and installed weather striping. This will keep the panel centered in the door, allow for expansion and contraction, but also prevent drafts around the panel. Probably overkill but it was easy and inexpensive. For the rails the groove was cut the same way but was able to be cut through. I miss judged the panel size and groove depth so I ended up having to use 2 layers of weather striping to fill the extra groove. Once the grooves were figured out I laid out joinery. For this I'm doing floating M&T joinery. I used multiple plunges lined up to make a 2.5" wide mortise that was 50mm deep. Mortise stock is 12mm. The only deviation is the bottom rail. I made that rail 9" wide and figured I should split the tenon into two and make them a bit larger. So there I went with two 1.5" wide mortises. Joinery complete, raised panel next. I started by gluing flat sawn material to make 2 panels that were not the size I wanted them to be.... oh well. I was making the door larger than I needed it and was goign to cut it to size on site. Now I'll just have less material to cut off on site. I was able to shift the top and bottom rail to account for the reduced panel size. I used the dado stack to fit the panel to the groove. After that was complete I wanted to do some sort of raised look but was getting stumped on how to do it. Then i remember that you can tilt the table saw arbor. I tilted the blade to 30 degrees. adjusted the blade height, adjusted the fence and cut a simple bevel. I didn't have a spare plate for zero clearance. The stock plate wouldn't work. So pucker factor at 11 I want forward. It went smoothly. I kept my hands near the miter slot, so far away from the blade. It also wasn't a through cut and there was no off cut to become a missile. You can see the profile created at the top of the image below. I forgot to take a picture of the panel after sanding before assembly. I'm going to have to keep this technique in the back of my mind as it worked really well. I like the results. After this was door assembly. This involved glue (Titebond 3), clamps (parallel 36" type), a hammer, and swearing. So a typical assembly. After assembly comes window but that was on order so the door sat in my shop for a week while I waited. I had yard work and a shed to organize so I took a break. Window came. Size was larger than I expected. I thought I ordered a 22" x 36" window. It ended up being a 24" x 37" window. I never knew how these assemblies worked so here is a picture of the window with half the frame removed. I took measurements and cut the opening a bit larger. Once done the window fit like a glove. I love how the cedar turned out. Cutting staves and gluing them so the wood was all vertical grain leaves an awesome effect. I wish I'd done the same with the panels so they matched. I'm not entirely sure how I'm going to finish the inside of the door. The outside face will be pained for sure but I'm on the fence if I wanted to do a clear coat on the inside or paint it. I'm leaning clear coat finish, they will be proud of the door and will likely show it off. If it's painted it won't look like much. More to come. I still need to finish prep, finish, and hang the door.
    7 points
  21. Nice to be missed! I'm still around. I just found myself getting a little burned out on WW. New semester preps, my own shop projects, friends' shop projects, etc. All woodworking, all the time. I've been hanging out on a British audio forum (Naim, should anyone be interested in whether or not one can hear the difference in a $50 speaker cable and a $5000 speaker cable) rather than coming here in my online time. Getting new tile in the living space this week, finally. I did manage to get some carriage doors built over the summer. And I adopted a new (5 YO) pup. She's a Rhodesian ridgeback, Tibetan Mastiff, Rottweiler mix. That's what she thinks, anyway.
    7 points
  22. went to Milwaukee and went to my son's wood guy, really good person, lots of various wood, spalted maple, birdseye maple, slabs all kinds, flame birch and many more his web site is under Milwaukeewoodworks.com and his name is Allen, sorry the link won't post for some reason but here's a couple of pictures, not at his place all the time so give him a shout before you go there
    7 points
  23. Baby was born today so when we get home I’ll lightly sand the finish and then put it into use! I’ll post a picture of the bassinet on the stand.
    7 points
  24. I've only been able to do little things the last several days. Cut the holes in a couple of wire ways that will mount to the vertical drop areas for ducting and power. I left the attic light on overnight again. This should help with that.
    7 points
  25. Then they got 4 coats of Helmsman Spar urethane and the steel stringers from a 72 Chevy wood bed pickup.
    7 points
  26. First spurtle attempt. Came out ok. From scraps of walnut and cherry.
    7 points
  27. The main body is chinaberry wood and the rim is some kind of rosewood I got from another woodworker clearing out his shop. Heres some shots finished.
    7 points
  28. External work is all done. Tonight I rubbed it all out with wax and steel wool. Also permanently installed all the knobs, went with glue and a single screw for each knob from the back. Top is also screwed down. I'll finish up the remaining internal parts this weekend.
    7 points
  29. I experienced a very unusual sort of 'kick-back' today. Ripping a rough edge from a board about 18" long. The off-cut was NOT trapped between the blade and fence. When the cut was complete, the waste had enough drag on the blade to slide backwards a bit, as they sometimes do. However, it was thin enough to drop into the slot of the throat plate, where it grabbed, and swung upward with enough force to give me a good stinging whack across the forearm. Then it continued into the saw, where it jammed the blade and made the throat plate jump out of its recess, before I could hit the switch. This is the perfect argument for using a zero-clearance insert, which I had been avoiding, so as to keep more air flow around the blade for dust collection. Lucky it did no real damage to me or the saw, but it certainly got my attention!
    6 points
  30. Well, I finished it and took your advice, @gee-dub. I put stretchers at the bottom and top and then used 2 layers of 3/4" plywood on top. I think it turned out pretty good. For those curious I used spax hardwood/mdf screws. I would definitely do rabbets on the walls and top and bottom next time.
    6 points
  31. I've been needing to clean out and organize my shed since i had to scramble to sheet rock the garage. I finally made the time to do it and wow what a difference. I didn't take a before picture but lets just say there was an isle for the lawn mower and nothing else. With it clean I have to stop saying I have no space to store a riding lawn mower. I can easily open up both shed doors and drive my ATV inside. In my cleaning i found a place to store all those miserable cases handheld power tools come in. They eat SOOOO much space and i can't bring myself to throw them away. I know i should just stick them on facebook for sale but all the effort and minimal gains leaves me keeping them or if i get sick of them sticking them in the trash can. Right now they will live in the shed attic.
    6 points
  32. Well, I started working on it and for some reason I focused in on a feature of your wood that seemed a bit odd to me, but I found a sample of "teak" that has it so was very pleased with myself until I realized that it really wasn't teak at all but rather an obscure wood (Baikiaea plurijuga) that has "Rhodesian teak" as one of its common names. Also that wood really doesn't have a face grain that is a close match for your wood. SO ... no joy so far Just FYI, the feature I was looking at is what appears to be "diffuse in aggregates" parenchyma (broken up banded parenchyma) but that seems unusually regular for diffuse in aggregates. Here's your wood with an example of the feature circled and then the same thing on the "teak" piece SO ... back to square one. EDIT: I realize this post doesn't tell you anything useful, I just put it up to show what a PITA this wood ID can be and to further excuse my long delay in getting to this.
    6 points
  33. Cl That is with a wood cleaner coat (that will evaporate). It shows what the finish will look like.
    6 points
  34. I unloaded the plane till so it could be moved. It is depressing to see this much dust on these things. Not that they don't normally get dusty . . . it's just that this is the wrong kind of dust ;-) These cleats will be hidden by the fixture. You can see that they have been used and re-used a few times. Helpful tip for aligning sections of cleat when a single piece is not used. There is cleat material running the full width of this fixture.
    6 points
  35. Finished morticing the rails, and leveling them with the legs. I didn't take pics of the joints, because they look like a beaver made them. A very OLD beaver...
    6 points
  36. Doesn’t have to be in your backyard, but I thought we could use a general thread on personal milling experiences and to show off your milling setups and log piles. A while back I got a couple sycamore logs from my neighbor. They’ve been sitting next to my log pile for a while, waiting for a nice day to mill them(the pile is mostly for firewood but I’m hoping to have a separate pile for milling soon). I’m running a Stihl 084 that @Bmac helped me score. I’ve got a 36” bar and matching Granberg alaskan mill. I know people will complain that I didn’t quarter saw all of this, but too bad.
    6 points
  37. I have been eyeballing the chainsaw mill but have not been able to pull the trigger yet. We hade an elm tree fall this spring so I figured what can I lose and I just free hand cut some of the logs and got a nice stack of some wood to dry. Just hoping I have enough that makes it so I can make a small box or something. Just feels cool to be able to make something from a tree that was in my yard.
    6 points
  38. The doc says I am off light duty and can move to "medium" duty. I am also done with my PT which pretty much made every day useless for the last 2 weeks . . . sheesh! Moving on . . . I don't think I showed my super sophisticated drywall hole alignment jig that helped me space the holes for the custom hangers as well as keep things in line. Witness marks on the jig match up with the laser level lines to keep things somewhat true. The milling area consists of four machines, jointer, planer, bandsaw and drum sander. There will be a vertical array going up the middle of these machines that will provide power and dust collection. The caps are somewhat domed so I used the drum sander to make a flat spot on the "top" of the cap. I then bolt the cap to the floor and build the array upward from it. I am using these little sinkers. They use wedges above and below. The lower wedges are pulled toward the vertical center by the threads of the fastener. The upper wedges are pushed toward the vertical center by butting against the fixture that is being fastened. When this sort of surface to surface mounting is the order of the day, these little guys work great. I drop a plumb bob from the upper attachment point to find my spot on the floor below. . Drill a 1/2" hole of the proper length, drop in the sinker, and impact the cap in place. I have checked these port heights many times but they still look wrong to me. I guess I will check them yet again since it will be easy to adjust that prior to connecting to the overhead ducting. I'm sure they're right . . . I checked multiple times . . . I'm sure they're right . . . Grrrr. *** UPDATE *** All is well with the port heights
    6 points
  39. went to Bay View near Milwaukee to visit our son and his family, his father-in-law has a sail boat and took us out on lake Michigan for half a day, man what a great time, and nice to get away from the wood shop for a couple of days!
    6 points
  40. What's on your bench that is worth sharing but isn't thread worthy? I made a light weight shelf. I'm going to raise and lower it in my garage with pullys
    6 points
  41. It’s been a couple of weeks since I made it but I don’t think I ever posted my bench. Got tired of having the top on sawhorses temporarily for the last few years. Bought the Record vise last year when I was picking something up I bought on eBay. Still need to put a board on the front and make saw wood jaws for the vise but it works. My 4 year old “helped” me make this. Also finished up this picture frame for my sister’s wedding shower last week.
    6 points
  42. My go-to lumber yard has the cherry(blue end) picture the 3 top boards are 14” wide! They stayed there for now, I needed maple, walnut and a couple boards of 6” cherry. The other shot is of a new place I found, tons of all kinds of slabs if that’s your thing, he did have some cherry 4/4 and I brought home about 60’ of that, he saws, dries all of the wood he has and has a 20” planer on site, I think I’ll have to go back soon
    6 points
  43. Just to polish it off, here are a couple of 'glamor shots' after the final coat of poly. But wait! There's more... Recall from the beginning of the thread, that this is only part of the commission. I also have to build a sitting bench, with shelves under the seat, and a bowl / tray thing to hold the guy's EDC while he is asleep. The bench will be started soon, now that there is room to turn around. But while the finish was drying on the shelf, I did get started on the EDC tray.I had glued up some thick chunks of gnarly cherry, off-cut from a previous adventure. The usable part is a good size to make an oblong bowl / tray, about 2" deep. I drew it out in the rough, but to manage it cleanly on by BS, a flat side is needed. Scrubbing across the grain takes material away quickly, especially on cherry. Like peeling a carrot. Tip for noobs: The edge of your plane sole makes a good straightedge for checking your progress. But trying to take this shot with a phone in my non-dominant hand was truly a pain. More to come, soon (I hope!)
    6 points
  44. Well, even with 7 hours of interruption (day job problem), I have finally managed to get a couple coats of topcoat on this thing. Anyone with GF High Performance experince have a suggestion on how long to wait before using the piece? I plan to scuff and coat once more tomorrow morning, hoping I can deliver tomorrow evening. Sorry for the distorted image. Maybe I can get a clear shot after I move it out of the tiny shop.
    6 points
  45. The Waterlox is curing faster than the Watco which is good. Went over everything lightly with some 400 grit this morning. I think another 2 coats will finish things up.
    6 points
  46. Here's some shots of the duct work going up. The brackets worked well. We'll pick it up again tomorrow.
    6 points
  47. Needed a way to lift the new mower, to be able to take the blades off for sharpening. I kept the magnetic drill press, after buying it for a tractor repair job. At first, I thought I would resell it, but after using it, I couldn't let it go. It came in handy today. I needed a 3/4" hole through three layers of 1/4" steel, and right below is some steering parts under rubber boots. It would have been impossible, and a terrible job holding a big drill by hand. It was a piece of cake with this. This is a stainless steel marine lifting eye with a working strength high enough to lift three of these complete mowers. I lifted it higher than this when I took the blades off, but this was the only picture I took of the loader doing the lifting. Previously, with a much lighter mower, I used a shed rafter to hold a chain hoist. I didn't want to get under that rig with this mower. I'll be installing an I-beam in the mechanic shop for this job, and other lifting.
    6 points
  48. Labor Day is for working, right? It was a very pleasant feeling morning, with temp in the '60's to start with, and low humidity, so I didn't want it to go to waste. Behind, and perpendicular to our rental house is another acre of land that went with it, but really separate. It looks like trees were planted on it, but it also has volunteer grass-mostly Bermuda. All the tree limbs were too close to the ground for my mower to cut, even with the roll bar folded down, and I didn't want to be putting the bar up, and down just to cut that one piece of ground. I've been paying the crew that cut the rental house yard to cut it, but it's really only about a 15 minute job with the new mower. Long story shortened some, I decided to limb up the trees enough to be out of the way of the rollbar. I have a Stihl pole saw, but it's the telescopic version, and pretty heavy to use for long at the time. I thought about buying the fixed length, 7' version, which is a lot easier to handle, but decided to try the 18v Ryobi that I keep in the toolbox on the truck. The Ryobi is slow compared to the gas powered ones, but I figured it might be worth saving the $450 for the Stihl, if it could do it. I was really surprised, and it only took me a couple of hours with the Ryobi, and I only had to change batteries once. I drug some of the limbs out onto the paved driveway to the rental house, and since the place where I've been dumping yard trash for 40 years is only a hundred and fifty yards away, I just pushed it. I can push more than I can pile on a truck or trailer, so only two pushes moved the majority of it. I need to drag the rest of it out into the road, so decided to wait for Labor Day busy holiday weekend to pass to get the last of it later this week. I cut what I could with the mower, from where I had cleared the downed limbs, and it's not going to be a bad job at all. Cutting that, and the yard at the rental house might take me a half hour, but will save $150 of paying the cutting crew to do it every two weeks. I'll work for $150 per half hour. I forgot to take a picture before I started "dragging laps", as they call that job around here, but you can see some in the background of the first picture. The deal on the rental house included having to take this along with it. It's kind of in the middle of a lake development, so I'm obligated to keep it up, even though legally, not really.
    5 points
  49. Been so busy at work I have not had any shop time in nearly a month but I did get my Woodcraft Pattern Makers vise today, took about 5 months I plan to retro fit this bench and mount this and the gun stock vise I picked up on it. I also received my back ordered steam bending clamps so I can get going on that now as well. Last month I received my new dust shield for the PantoRouter this provides easier access for bit changes Finally one of my birthday gifts last month was a light for the bandsaw works pretty good
    5 points
  50. Trim around the attic ladder. Lights in the attic.
    5 points