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  1. These were an excuse to use up some scraps and to try out round tenons. It was enjoyable to use a rounder as I have few old ones that belonged to my Granddad and Great Granddad who were Wheelwrights. I was also guided by Jack Hill's book on Country Chairs and Bob Flexner's article on soap finish. Interestingly I had no raised grain when applying the finish. The benefit of edge tools rather than abrasive. The next chair shaped object will be a back stool. But first I want to set up my lathe and bandsaw. And I might have some gift boxes to make first. Two of these stools will be gifts and Christmas is coming!
    10 points
  2. Got my second stave bowl done today. Marblewood staves, aromatic cedar inserts, top ring and base. What a pain getting the stave angles right!
    9 points
  3. Had some different views than normal this week traveling for work. Second hotel view This door is supposedly original from the 15th century.
    8 points
  4. Sorry I haven't been here in awhile. We purchased a house in Yadkinville, NC and to my surprise, our house in San Marcos, CA sold very quickly. The San Marcos house needs quite a bit of work, so I thought it would take awhile to sell, but I didn't even have to list it, just word of mouth to sell it. And we got our desired price. The moving van will be here Sept. 22nd to start their part of the packing and should drive away on Sept. 24th. We will drive to Phoenix the first night and do about 500-600 miles a day until we pull up to our house in NC. We did get a nice surprise: The NC house was carpeted and my wife's walker doesn't work well on it. My daughter, who lives near there, pulled up some of the carpet and found out that the house has cherry and oak hardwood floors. We are getting them refinished and are good to go. Now, to get on topic. I am starting to disassemble the shop and I had several people ask me to document the move. We are using Allied Van Lines for the move. I have to pack the garage and disassemble the tablesaw island, but most of it will just be saran wrapped and pushed onto the truck. I took all of my tools in my tool cabinet, sprayed them down with CRC 3-36 rust preventative, wrapped them in packing paper and reused a crate my son had made for another use. All of my hand tools fit into the crate. My son added a set of Two Cherries bench chisels and Phiel carving chisels to the collection. Everything went into this one crate and the lid is screwed on. That should slow down sticky fingers. I decided to take all of the power equipment, even though I may be buying a Saw Stop when we get there. We will have to see what the budget will hold. There is a 1 3/4 car garage under the house in NC, but the ceiling is only 7 feet high, which makes swinging plywood and longer board a problem. I am going to set up temporary shop in it, then build a shop building after. The city ordinances say I can build up to three 600 sq. ft. outbuildings, so that will be the size of the new shop unless I can figure out away around things. I need enough shop to be able to handle remodeling and some cabinet work as we make the house fit our lives. I have been voluntold that I will be removing the trash compacter and moving the dishwasher to be closer to the sink. For some reason, it is a good 6-8 feet from the sink. Shouldn't be too tough, just enlarge the hole for the trash compactor, redo the plumbing and convert the old dishwasher location into pantry shelves. I also have to do some serious electrical work. The house only has a 100 amp service, but it has four electric meters. The previous owner had a beauty parlor added over the garage and it has its own meter. There was an apartment in the basement that was rented out and it has a meter. I haven't figured out the fourth meter yet. I am going to install a 200 amp service along with a 24KW generator for power outages. I have to have power for a CPAP machine and I don't want to think about what my wife will say if we have one of the extended power outages the South is famous for. Then I have to run a 100 amp subpanel to the garage for now, which will be run to the new shop when it is ready. This is getting kinda long. I will post pictures as we go. First set will be packing the existing shop in CA.
    8 points
  5. Up until yesterday, I'd never smoked a piece of meat. My first was a brisket, smoked in my gas grill with choke cherry wood from a tree in our yard that has died off. I probably spent 10 hours watching videos on smoking brisket and felt I was well prepared. It paid off because the result was sensational. Nice heavy bark that wasn't too dry and the meat was as tender and juicy as I've ever had. Here's the halfway point. I forgot to take one of the finished result.
    8 points
  6. Don't think I've had a day this productive in ages. Got the replacement anvil installed on my impact driver (bit snapped inside the old one). Partially rewired my DC blower. Still need to get a junction box for the wireless switch to live inside though. Rewired and tested the new-to-me jointer and it works! Now I just need to swap in the new blades that came with it and clean up the beds. Alignment was surprisingly still pretty good. Drilled the hole through my wall for DC ducting and got the brackets located for the first run. Installed the rest of the overhead lights in the lumber shed.
    8 points
  7. A friend's sister does quilting. We talked about a rack back when I didn't have the shop finished and I completely forgot. Time to catch up. Got the required specs from her and got approval on design number 4. As always wood selection comes first. Like many materials, cherry comes in a variety of colors and figures. I found a couple of similar looking boards that will yield the parts. Rough blanks. I milled to thickness and general size. The shape of the end brackets will let me cut around some pitch pockets in these blanks. I rough the shape out at the bandsaw. Clean it up a bit with some rasps and cut the bottom of the rail notch like you would dovetail waste. This gets me here. I have done a lot of Greene and Greene stuff. During that journey I picked up one of these double round overs. I find the 1/8" and 3/16" radius cutters handle most of what I need. The bit comes with a variety of washer/spacers that allow setting for your material thickness. I use a bit of scrap to set the height and keep the leftover washers in a bag that fits in the tackle box cubby assigned to this bit. The purpose of the bit is to allow you to round both sides at once while always routing down hill. If you've seen much G&G style stuff you get why this is helpful. At any rate, I end up here. If you've ever wondered what you would do with a parrot vise, this is one thing. A little hand work and I end up here. More to come.
    7 points
  8. OK, ready to go in a box and take a ride to Arizona.
    7 points
  9. Still rolling on the quilt rack.
    7 points
  10. Round and round I go. I feel like a dog chasing his own tail. I'll be chasing it another 4-5 days
    7 points
  11. There are many ways to make a tenon. However I would suggest, and I'm saying this from experience. Make your mortise first. Take your time and get it smooth on the insides, and as clean as possible. Then cut your tenon, in any way that works for you, but cut it longer wider and thicker than the mortise your going to put it in. Then with a block plane or a shoulder plane take thin fine cuts equally from both side and along the top and bottom of the tenon. This is especially important if the tenon is to stay in the center of your piece. You only want to take a little at a time from each side of the cheeks. The same amount each time, until it fits snugly. Then the tops and bottoms. The key here is to take the smallest amount possible to make all 4 edges fit as snug as you can make it. Then, if the mortise sides are smooth and the tenon cheeks are smooth, there should be very little glue used to lock them into a single piece. And cut to length, leaving just a tiny space at the bottom of the mortise, to catch any squeeze out. You can make a jig to slide on your table saw to cut the tenon shoulders exactly the same every time. And if you make the jig adjustable, you'll not need a bunch of jigs.. Always make the tenon second, and bigger in all directions so you can trim it down looking for that perfect fit. Patience.
    7 points
  12. After yardwork was finished, Cody and I stopped by Pinson Mounds State Archeological Area, to see the 39th annual Archeofest. The view from atop Saul's Mound is awesome. Here, you can see several of the 'Natve American' vendors that set up to sell food and trinkets. Every year the number of people that can legitimately claim Native American heritage shrinks, to be filled by 'wanna-be' folks that would look more at home at the '69 Woodstock music festival. There are several presentations on Native American culture, including dancers, that are great to watch. The park also does demonstrations of what life was like in the Middle Woodland period, when this site was constructed. Covering 1200 acres, the site contains 15 identified mounds, and hundreds of yards of fort-like earthworks. Believed to have been used as a meeting / market / ceremonial place more than a village, it includes the largest Middle Woodland mound in the US, named Saul's mound. At 72 feet high, it is composed of more that 8 million cubic feet of soil. Stairway up to the platform on Saul's mound. 124 stair steps had me puffing like a steam engine by the time I reached top. Here is the view from the museum walkway on the front side. Pretty impressive for a stone-age civilization.
    7 points
  13. Sapele face. The cabinets on the bench are reversed. On the left installs on the right. Etc.I have a scribe edge going against masonry. The area feels like inside but there is one open wall to the outside. The cabinets are well protected from the weather. And the finish is high gloss Lush urethane. I recommended sapele for its beauty and weather resistance. The panels are book matched with flat sawn sapele. Between the cabinets will be a beverage refrigerator under counter. A granite counter will go wall to wall over the 2 cabinets and refridgerator. Inside one will have adjustable shelves and the other cabinet will have pull out trays. And 4 drawers on top. Not shown but on the side that is next to the refrigerator has 5" wide piece of sapele on the face edge attached to the plywood. The refrigerator will cover up most of the cabinet side but the front part will be seen.
    7 points
  14. Just got back from a 4 day weekend to Whistler, BC. My daughter and a couple of friends were running a 3 day ultra event; first day was a 1700M vertical ascent race in just 5.7 KM, second was a 25 KM race, and the third day was a 55 KM race. Total vertical ascent was 6450M. What you see in the phot o is typical of the terrain, including the boulder field. The other pic is Sarah and one of her running buddies, Steve, just after finishing the 3rd race. I go to most of their events to volunteer while they race. So much fun it should be il.egal.
    7 points
  15. I don’t plan to have any routers dedicated to it at this point. From ky test it’s easy enough to dial it in on the fly. Made a few mini storage drawers for my BS and TS fence rails.
    7 points
  16. trays are done. Next 4 drawers...
    7 points
  17. Here's a view of the runner. The two inner holes are oversized and allow a bit of adjustment. The two outer holes are for fixing the runner in position. Overview prior to disassembly for finishing. Time for finish.
    7 points
  18. You know you're getting old when a head cold can knock you out for a couple of days . I realized I kind of brushed past the making of the top supports other than drilling holes in them. These kinds of forms can be done a few ways. On the last piece I did with a floating top I used a template and the router table. For these little guys I'll use a combination of the bandsaw, spindle sander, and hand work. I do the layout right on the piece and rough them out on the bandsaw. I cut a notch in the milled face of a piece of scrap that will clear the diameter of the spindle I am using. I clamp this down like a fence. The distance is set to engage the rough cut but not to sand deeper than the layout line. I then sand and adjust until I am right up to the layout line. Same for the other profile. This gets me here right off the machines. For larger work or greater stock removal I use rasps. For these little guys a bow sander will do fine to fair in the curves. The spindel sander, although oscillating, can still leave grit marks across the figure in the tight radius. A shaped backer and a strip of abrasive coarse enough to remove those scratches will do the trick. I hold the rubber doo-dad and pull the strip of paper through till I have removed the scratches. I repeat with finer grits till I get what I want. Those of you familiar with a stroke sander know exactly what's happening here . This gets me from the look of the rear support in the picture to the result on the front support. I'll finish the other ends up, blend things overall, and move on.
    7 points
  19. Typical practice is to run the working block through the thicknesser after each slice, so you don't end up with your working block having 2 rough faces.
    7 points
  20. Just thought this was an interesting picture. Had some cherry sitting on my bench waiting for the temp to drop a little so I can get back in my shop. It was only exposed to the lights in the garage and the color change is quite dramatic over about four months.
    6 points
  21. A big step up from the old Craftsman. Built a bed right away. Also found another good use for the rare earth magnets.
    6 points
  22. Hung the door I "restored" for the neighbor.
    6 points
  23. Drawers are done. Cabinet backs and shelves...then a final sanding...then varnish.
    6 points
  24. Getting rid of pallet wood for planters.
    6 points
  25. This building was here when we first acquired our place. The front T111 was rotting off the front of it. I forgot to take a picture of the front before starting on it, but had one already here, although it had gotten in much worse shape with big holes in the right door. First picture is a few years old. This is after a couple of mornings work on it. The Sun doesn't hit that side until just before 12, and I'm not working on it in hot weather in the Sun, so will only work on it in the shade in the mornings. It will be painted a traditional barn red with white trim. The doors are 10 x 10, so I'm using this pattern with new T111 on the doors to avoid showing butt joints. The doors with be framed around the edges with white board, and the "X" over the T111 seams. Each door had three 8" Tee hinges. I'm going to weld some new more substantial hinges, and will include those in this thread. I bought some 7" long hinge barrels with ball bearings, and some steel plates off ebay for less than buying one such commercially made hinge. There is a Big jump in prices from hardware store hinges to substantial ones. https://www.ebay.com/itm/293623371904 I had covered the rotting fascia boards with vinyl coated aluminum a couple of years ago when I had rented a lift for another job. The building is 24x40. I plan to add on another 24' wide addition on the left side that extends 16' past the back of the current building, and wraps around the back of it. The back 16x24 foot on the back will be for welding and machine work, and the 24x56 a woodworking shop. I had dug footings for it several years ago, but then we bought the rental house, my Mother moved in with us, and I filled the footings back in because I knew it would be several years before I could get to it. I couldn't keep putting off redoing the front though.
    6 points
  26. This is what Was trying to explain earlier.I used some biscuits for alignment. Just the front of the side will show. The refrigerator hides most of it.
    6 points
  27. I haven’t given up on this project. Hell, they could have elected a new president and subpoenaed documents from the past by the time I get thru. I’ve been at the mercy of the weather but finally got the final coat of finish on it yesterday. Parts are everywhere so more pics to follow. The top received two coats of ARS gloss, followed by four coats of GF HP satin. i needed drawer stops so I cut a channel and sliced it to fit over the drawer glide. I covered the front edge with a strip of leather to give them some soft closure. I will pick up the glass for the doors on Tuesday and provide an almost complete pic then.
    6 points
  28. Did another project today. Had a spare ring because of a miscalculation building the first bowl. I took a rough bowl blank and cut it in two with a parting tool, then sanded both halves flat. Sanded the ring and glued it all together. Turned it and finished it . Still need to finish the base .
    6 points
  29. Thanks all. I drill counter-bores in the top supports. The ones from underneath are just deep enough to hide the screw head. The ones on top are as deep as I can while leaving a good 3/8" of meat for the screw to hang onto. This counter-boring from each side creates a wood movement tolerance mechanism of sorts as the screw can shift somewhat. If anyone wondered why people spend a little on 'auto-adjust' clamps here's an example. I drill one hole, loosen the clamp . . . . . . slide the blank and re-clamp without adjustment and drill the second hole. The through hole is large enough for the screw to pass through easily. To center the screw in the oversized hole I use a transfer punch sized to the through hole. I remove the top, drill the receiver holes and then return the top to the dry assembly to test the screws. Here's a couple of shots of the 'domed' leg tops in situ. You can see the straight angular planes with the dome gives some effect to anyone who happens to notice. I have fun waiting to see who may notice . . . then again I have a sick sense of humor . And the whole thing looks like so. Obviously everything is still pretty much straight off the machines at this point. Time for a drawer.
    6 points
  30. I wanted a sort of domed look to the top of the legs. This will hardly show but I wanted an excuse to try the process. I take a piece of thick scrap (a laminated pair of 3/4" plywood pieces in this case) and cut a v-groove down the middle. The intersecting cut is a dovetail slot for a clamp which I didn't end up using. A pin in placed between this block and a base at the pivot point required to make the dome radius I want. The un-tapered section of the leg will lay in the -groove like so. I clamp the whole rig to the edge sander to do the shaping. Turned out I needed a bigger piece of scrap for the base just in case you noticed. The groove in the base means nothing; it just happened to be in the scrap. Basically the "dome" will begin at the inner corner and sweep to the outer corner. This will make more sense later when seen. I tested the operation on a pine blank I had been using and then moved to the actual legs. BTW, kudos to my "hand model" Dan who is the guy who helped me build the shop in the first place . So here we go with the first pass of roughed out dome shapes, inner corner to outer corner. Here it is cleaned up a bit. The dome is visually subtle but actually drops 1/4" between corners. Enough of that. I bevel the top glue up. I thought due to scale I would go with a steeper bevel under the edge all the way around. Turned out the same bevel as the hanging wall cab was visually satisfying. I cut the bevel on the tablesaw and hand plane to final dimension. This last shot is just the front of the drawer. I cut about an 1/8" off to use as a veneer. If things go as planned I will through dovetail the drawer box and laminate the veneer to the front to simulate half-blinds at the front of the drawer.
    6 points
  31. After a lot of time outside on the house I wasn't feeling well for a few days and thought an air conditioned shop was the need. I pulled an old project off the floor and proceeded to make the bases for the gliders. I took the orIginal chair back and forgot to position the holes for the hardware. Spend a couple days trying to figure it out so I would have tge pattern.
    6 points
  32. Today's Grilling Tip: I got tired of my eyeglasses being spattered with oil and grease whenever we grill. Now I don a cheap pair of clear OTG safety glasses, which solves the problem. And nothing elevates your grill glam like wearing safety glasses.
    6 points
  33. Friends visiting from out of town which is great. Slows progress though. I got the top supports mortised in. All of this is dry fit and right off the machines so far.
    6 points
  34. I also forgot to post about the mail box support I made. I made this right before we went to the hospital for delivery. One of my neighbors gave me the bright ideal to combine our 4 individual posts in to a group post to clean up our mail box area. So i bought some treated timbers and went to work. The main brace extending out is attached to the post with a through tenon. I extended the through tenon backwards about 12". The cross braces the mail boxes sit on are a half lap joint secured with screws. The entire post is quite sturdy. I left about 36" of post to go below grade. It was a quick fun project.
    6 points
  35. It was a day or two agao but they are all blending together. Dusted off the climbing gear for deer hunting and did some practice with my cousin. We climbed a few of the trees in my backyard just to make sure that we still knew how to and wouldn't make mistakes come fall. While at it I tied off the pole saw and trimmed some branches. This picture makes it look like my cousin is hovering in mid air. Even with my feet 25 feet of the ground my exceptional 5 foot 6 inch stature and 12 foot pole saw, there were still quite a few unreachable branches. The crotch in the ash (left) and Elm (more center) are roughly 20 feet up. These trees would make some wonderful lumber some day in the very distant future.
    6 points
  36. We average 11 outages a year. Last year the shortest was 6 hours and the longest almost 72. Of course our old generator crapped out during the 72 hour outage. It was a little over 10 yrs old. Its replacement showed up today. I hope it has a long run too.
    5 points
  37. How many layers/what's the final thickness you're aiming for? Not the clearest photo, but I finally got the joinery all cut for this led-strip lamp, and did the first dry assembly.
    5 points
  38. These are my two most used squares. Starret 6" combo, and a 24" drifting T-square. The drafting square pulls double duty as a straightedge for checking planed surfaces. I alsofind the the wide blade and T head make it much less likely to slip when striking a long line. Both of these have seen a lot of use, but still perform quite well. Having said that, I recently acquired an inexpensive (~$75) set of 10 machinists 1-2-3 blocks, and their squareness is handier than a shirt pocket.
    5 points
  39. I had said a couple of nights ago that Pam and I were going to her Sister's Airstream for dinner, but I had sort of gotten distracted that day by spending 13 hours in the ER with my Mom. They were having a Memorial ceremony for our niece that had died some weeks back. I thought it was going to be a small thing. I didn't even know they were staying in our rental/guest house, as well as a crowd of family. The ceremony was yesterday. There were about 50 people there, and most went out in boats after the ceremony to cast the ashes. There was a rented tent set up, and enough food to feed a city. It was very nice, and everyone thanked us, and were very appreciative of having it at our place. I always thought all the pavement in front of that house was pretty ugly, but it turns out it's very practical. All the kids really enjoyed the dock and swimming area, so it was just good luck that the dock had been finished. Still a fight to get grass to grow down there. I never could get anyone to come screen my topsoil mountain, and a year wait to buy one, so I'm going to build one this Fall. Once I get it covered with nice grass, and get that bathroom house finished, I think we're going to have our hands full with weddings. I just look at it and see what needs to be done, but everyone loved it, and saw it different than I do.
    5 points
  40. Thanks all. This is the second coat of an oil varnish blend. Hope to finish up by tomorrow or the next day.
    5 points
  41. I finally got frustrated with breaking down sheet goods with a skilsaw and drywall square. Time to see how much of a piece of junk a $100 track saw is. I spent more money on the tracks, since they're compatible with the Makita tracksaw, but I'll see how the WEN behaves before deciding to sink 4x as much on a better saw. Update: after the first few cuts... Not bad. Even just with the cheapo included rip blade it cuts perfectly straight and reasonable clean. Plunge action could be smoother, but it does the job. There's a lot of plastic parts, but the plate is flat. We'll see if it warps with time/use.
    5 points
  42. Picked up the Wen drill chuck for my lathe. Threw it in the headstock quickly to check it out. Pretty nice for under $20.
    5 points
  43. This morning, I had the supplied air rig out to sand a couple of chairs Pam was working on for the porch, so I decided to see how I wanted to sand the doors before I went any farther with painting. First I tried 120, and ended up going to 60 grit. It knocks all the little T111 splinters down quickly, but still leaves the surface rough enough to see that it's not smooth, while still being able to run your hands over them without anything snagging. I only painted about 1/4 of one door before the Sun caught me. At least I know what I want to do with them now.
    5 points
  44. I’ve been enjoying the MFT style top on my Husky adjustable bench. Also finally had time to do a few test joints with my Leigh jig to get familiar with it.
    5 points
  45. Knocked out another quick project. Hazel needed a bow holder. I used some carbon fiber rods that I bought to repair my fishing rod. It turns out I only needed half of one of the 10 I bought. They are nice and rigid and take sanding well so I used them as pins for a holder. Used a keyhole bit to mount this too the wall. And then filled it up.
    5 points
  46. I really enjoy having my shorts-tower. It allows me to quickly pick species and dimension from my scraps. The shorts also stay a lot more usable than when I used to paw through them in a trash can . Here's a reconstruction of the scrap piece that I saw the part I needed in. I didn't think to take a pic before hand . I hacked out a rough sized piece at the bandsaw and milled it down for my leg stretcher. I'm at that often discussed phase of the piece that I start taking measurements off the piece as opposed to making parts from the plans. Marking off the partial assembly I set the width on a non tapered portion of the front legs. This stretcher will connect with sliding dovetails just because I feel like it. The bottom of the stretcher will be on plane with the bottom of the aprons for visual continuity . . . (ouch! That was too many syllables in a row). I will use my router sled just because I have one. A miter gauge would work as well. I want the sliding DT to stop 1/8" from the front of each front leg. Once I have this sled position known I place a stop. The off-cuts from the leg tapering operation will act as fillers to keep me square. Here's the sled setup for height and depth of cut along with flip stops for each leg as they are bi-symmetrical. I managed to completely skip any pictures of the cast iron tenon jig I used to dovetail the ends of the stretcher but, it goes together like this. The ends of the stretcher need a little work to allow the profile to seat correctly. Sorry for the bad focal point in this shot but you get the idea. And I end up here for now. Time for the table top supports.
    5 points
  47. My mother is participating in a craft show and asked if I could batch out a bunch of these little guys. I have about 30 to do in about 2 months. This guy was the trial run to get batch process all hammered out. He's not perfect by any means but will look pretty neat on my new shelf. All in all took about 30min from block of scrap to first coat of finish. Plan on doing sets of 3 or 4 (buck, doe, and two little ones) for each set. And if nobody wants them, got some Christmas gifts ready to rock for this year!
    5 points
  48. Small squares are the ones that get the most use in my shop. I have a 12" Craftsman combination square that's probably older than Tom's - pushing 40 years. It has seen tons of use over the years. More recently, a friend suggested small double squares for joinery layout. I bought a couple of 4" PEC blems from Taytools (~ $25 each), and they have gotten a lot of use over the past 2 or 3 years.
    4 points
  49. Started a cabinet to go under my Husky bench. I haven’t decided if it will be drawers or cubbies, so it’s currently housing my Leigh DT jig and a couple other bulky items. Might end up staying that way.
    4 points