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  1. Finally, after some danish oil on the trim ... it's ready. I've found before with cherry, that different boards can have a different colour when the finish is furst applied, hopefully as it ages, the colours will even out. Now I have to find out if it will fit through the door into the house ... maybe I should have measured that first!
    12 points
  2. Well this has been on my to do list for awhile, and I'm finally back to having time in the workshop. As a High School coach for baseball, spring can be a very hectic time, one reason I've been missing in action on this site the last few months. Well the season finally wrapped up and I'm ready for some alone time in the shop. I've been wanting to make a couch for a while, but my usually agreeable wife has not been sold on the idea. She usually is very happy with everything I build, but a wood framed couch with cushions is one area she has been resistant. Now I was overly impressed with @h3nry's
    11 points
  3. 11 points
  4. Went to the recently renovated Veterans Memorial today, thanks to all who’s served and Welcome Home
    10 points
  5. I'm starting on the carriage doors to replace my overhead door in the shop. The bigger machines and the Pantorouter are making it much easier. Straight line ripping on the slider.
    10 points
  6. After 42 years of shooting trap I got my first 25 straight
    10 points
  7. Big step forward, I've got the frame all assembled, albeit just dry fit not glued yet. Still a ways away from gluing. Shaping, sanding, arm fabrication and possible fabrication of the bottom panel before gluing. So the following pics show in more detail what was in my mind. I appreciate the input from @pkinneb and @Chestnut ! So for joining the back frames to the legs I'm using just 3 dominoes and relying on a nice long grain glue joint. I'm confident of this part. And Chesnut, in the one pic in the previous post I had the frame upside down. You'll see as I go through this the top r
    9 points
  8. Hurdles keep popping up. The conveyer belt on my drum sander broke. Lost 2 days. Back up and running. There are 4 panels like above for the night stands and 2 more just like them but taller for the dresser. All in clamps now. I have a nice stash of curly oak. Demanding to work it. Any planing leaves holes in the wood. I make the panels a shy 3/8" and drum sand it to 1/4". Required for 2 good sides. Kinda like sanding end grain. But worth the effort.
    9 points
  9. Weather finally cooled some.... Its still too hot for this. From left to right 3rd cut 1st cut 2nd cut. It's cool to watch the walnut change color from gross green to chocolate.
    8 points
  10. Caught in the act:
    8 points
  11. Not age. It's climate change causing a shift in gravitational mass. That's my story, and I'm sticking to it!
    8 points
  12. Making progress on the carriage doors. A whole bunch of fairly light wood gets heavy when you put it together. Glad I didn’t go with white oak!
    8 points
  13. Got my 2nd shot yesterday afternoon. So far no side-effects. Hopefully I'm not jinxing myself.
    8 points
  14. So almost 4 years later this project needs an update. Maybe a year after completion the rear leg let loose from the lower shelf. There was enough strength in the front joinery (domino) that allowed the stool to continue to function for another 2 years. A few days ago Megan told me the shelf broke, it's used as a foot rest for leg shaving, luckily it broke while not in use. It's started to look rough. We have a lot of minerals in our water so even trying to keep it clean there is only so much a person can do. I'm also suspecting that the white haze is the old finish de-lam
    7 points
  15. All the curved frame rails are now cut and routed. Still some sanding and corner cleanup to do, not to mention repairing a couple of chip-outs where routing 'uphill' wasn't avoidable. Soon, the frames will be complete, and joinery can begin!
    7 points
  16. Today was a little walnut log recovery. Milling to happen later today when the driveway is in shade.
    7 points
  17. Finished up the template in a short burst of shoptime. First, I clamped on a pretty straight level as a fence extension. This let me trim the back edge parallel to the front. I also parallel trimmed the end tabs. Next, I used a file, and the Spagnuolo Special flexible sanding strip to fair out the curved edges. Last, I slathered on a quick coat of shellac, more to help the edges sand out less splintery, than anything else. Once that dried for a few minutes, I could use the template as a gauge to determine how many pieces, and how long they must be, to glue up fo
    7 points
  18. Found some BB ply for $38/sheet after tax.
    7 points
  19. Got everything glued up. This was the part that I was dreading. Because the inside of the cabinet was a light wood and the outside a contrasting wood, I only had the thickness of the veneer to be off or the lighter wood would show through. This meant I had a tolerance of 1/64. Unlike solid wood projects where you can just sand the two to blend the wood together, I can't because I would burn through the veneer. I used epoxy to give me some extra time to clamp everything together. This helped a lot with getting everything aligned. I also tried to get as little glue everywhere as possible so I do
    7 points
  20. The cushions were sewn, then stuffed with foam and batting. I had originally thought to add buttons to both the seat and back, but decided that it looked better with buttons only on the back, and a plain seat. With the correct dies the buttons were very easy to make ... I didn't invest in the expensive forming tool ... a pipe-clamp did the job just as well. The back cushion was then stapled to the frame, with the seat cushion left loose.
    7 points
  21. Took a little time off to go camping with the kids. Just what I needed to get out of the city for a while. Got a little hectic trying to get as much done as possible to be able to go and relax and not think about the clients waiting for me to get back to them. So here is the progress. First thing was to cut the mortises fort the legs. I used the template that I made earlier and attached them with screws. I used the router to cut out the mortis with a guide and a 1/4 upcut bit. The mortis's are 3/4 deep. Then I cut a block to fit the mortises. Making sure that they
    6 points
  22. Where I left off was I had the couch framework dry fitted together. Before I took apart the frame I noticed one back frame slightly lower than the adjoining frame. When I took everything apart I checked and I made a slight error with a measurement. The back frame is supposed to sit 1.5" below the seat frame. I measured 1.75" by mistake. In correcting the mistake I got my self mixed up and moved the mortise hole .25 in the wrong direction. So I said enough of this, filled in the domino mortise with a half of a domino and finally got the mortise in the right place. Next up was fitting
    6 points
  23. A bit more work done on the curved frames today. I clamped them all together and hit 'em hard with a belt sander to smooth out any chipped edges and make the shapes as uniform as possible. I discovered that the carpet tape had managed to let the template shift slightly while routing a couple of them, but the sander brought them all back in line. Then I started the cross pieces that will join the curved rails to their opposing straight rails. I first planned to traditional frame joinery, using M&T or mitered corners. But mulling it over in my head, I realized these pieces will bear no load,
    6 points
  24. Moving in baby steps now while waiting for an assist on the indoor unit mount and vacuuming. Someone pointed out the need for a pair of handrails on the attic ladder as the product as sold only supplies the right hand one. I cobbled a left hand one out of scrap found in the temporary shop.
    6 points
  25. I took a nap after lunch for 2 hours and woke up feeling great. I trimmed 6 of our spruce trees and hauled the limbs to the waste site. I feel 100% normal today.
    6 points
  26. Last time I whacked him on the knuckles for swiping my pencil was shortly before COVID took hold. Right after that, they closed the border with Canada. Coincidence? I don't think so.
    6 points
  27. Started getting the tools sharpened for my class at MASW. Started with the spokeshaves
    6 points
  28. Some times its just a challenging with people that fall in the adult category.
    6 points
  29. A wise man told me last Sunday..."You know since you just bought her a new couch that she's going to want a whole new living room right?" At first I just shrugged this off, since I just built our last living room set about 2 years ago. Then Wednesday night's conversation came around.... Fiance: "Hey....So I really like the stuff you built 2 years ago. Like I love it. However, it doesn't go with our new couch very well." Me: "Why is the old man right all the damn time!" Fiance: *Very puzzled look* Me: "Dad said this was coming and I said he was nuts. But obviously he has
    6 points
  30. Fabrication of the two back panels are done. I've decided to do the back panels in two pieces as I have the middle support leg to attach to. This also makes glue up so much easier. Having panels 33" long is a heck of a lot easier than 68" long. I also thought it might be easier to keep things square and flat, but we'll see. My plan is to glue up one half, let the glue dry and then attach the other half. The glue up will be mainly long grain to long grain with a few dominos for alignment with the back panels and the back legs. The front supports will be joined to the front legs via 2 dominos at
    6 points
  31. Finally got the kitchen helper all done and off for delivery today to my niece. I did three coats of the tried and true danish oil and burnished it with 0000 steel wool in between each coat and after the final coat to finish off the project. I have seemed to get good results with the oil and like the way it looks on projects. I just make sure and not put too much on and do a good wiping down the parts after each coat and burnishing in between the coats.
    6 points
  32. The middle 2 rails between the middle and bottom drawers decided to bow. One in, the other out. Behind the rail is dead space. So I added oak 2 plus inches wide on edge. On the one that was bowed out I removed about 3/16" but leaving wood on the ends.It makes contact for a couple of inches leaving a long gap. There are 3 screws, one in the middle which pulls it flat and 2 more on the ends to attach it to the back side of the rail. The middle screw is the adjuster. Still a lot of gap left if more adjustments needed later. The other rail worked by adding a straight piece with screws. I am a
    6 points
  33. HVAC lands. Outdoor unit up. Slab done. More fun with HVAC tomorrow.
    6 points
  34. Kicked off the long weekend with a little wood scrap fire
    6 points
  35. After getting sidetracked for at least a week, I finally finished my wild idea. It works like a charm. I can drag it over grass, and it doesn't harm it a bit, and won't even cut a Dandelion off. It's 6-1/2 x 12 feet-like a Jointer plane for topsoil. I could have made it a lot heavier, but it works great. I don't have any screened topsoil yet-still waiting on the big excavator to come pile the dirt up for another guy to bring a big screen. I used some dirt I had piled up with the loader. It has some sticks and rocks in it, which requires a lot more passes, because one piece of ju
    6 points
  36. Progress has been made. We got the new washer and dryer both front load because with 2 short people reaching down into a washer requires a step stool (joking but not too far from the truth). It also allows us to have a table on top of the washer for storage and folding capabilities. I made a thickened slab the same way I made the vanity area for Megan. it's a rough torsion style with ribs attached to plywood. I used clamps and cauls to get enough leverage to securely attach the ribs. I didn't want nail holes in the surface. Here is the underside when done. At the bottom i glued on a
    6 points
  37. Almost have have everything ready for glue up so I needed to take care of a problem. I dropped the corner of one of the shelves and needed to fix it. Although, it is on the back of the cabinet behind the back, and no one will see it, I felt it needed addressing. This was a little bit more labor some than the previous touch ups. Because I dropped the shelf, the fibers were smashed in. The first thing I did was add some mdf dust and glue to bring the mdf all the way up to the veneer. Then I put the veneer in my router to measure the thickness. After that, I was able
    6 points
  38. Nice to have friends with toys.
    6 points
  39. Yes, retired. My efforts have been minuscule compared to people on the front lines, but I am happy to have been able to do at least something.
    6 points
  40. And finally I wanted some showy wood trim on the face. Originally I was thinking that running the trim all the way round the bottom edge would be nice ... but then I remembered I had made the upholstery go round a compound curve on the sides. I was having enough trouble getting trim to fit on the front which although flat had varying amounts of fabric and padding to cover up at the corners. I decided to continue with the knot theme on the legs ... Since the trim would be attached with screws, I made applied carvings that I could attach to cover over the screw holes.
    6 points
  41. Made some more progress last night! Does anyone else start to get nervous when you have to drill a hole and put screws into your project. I always get a little nervous when you are so close to the end of a project and have to do something that is not easily corrected. Got the cleats screwed down; final sanding with 220; and the first coat of Danish Oil on the parts.
    6 points
  42. I put the edging on the sides of the legs. I used the rabbiting bit showed earlier in the thread. I set the bit with this jig. It is super easy to make and has come in extremely handy. It is just a harbor freight caliper held into a piece of mdf by a bolt. After I cut all the rabbits, I cut the edging. It was leftover from the offcuts from the other edging. I taped all of the edging on similar to what I did in previous steps. Cleaned everything up with a scraper. There are a couple reasons to put the edging on the veneers. 1st it protects the corners o
    6 points
  43. Here is what I came up with to glue the veneer onto the legs. I just took an extra piece of the 10 degree off cut and glued it to the mdf cauls. Sometimes I had to used another clamp holding the caul and the leg down to keep it from sliding up after applying the glue. I used 15 min epoxy to glue it down. It seems like this isn't as slippery as veneer glue.
    6 points
  44. Both HVAC units in and functional. TIme for e few catch-up details before starting the DC shed.
    5 points
  45. I've talked with a lot of people and it seems reactions are highly variable. Sorry to hear your experience was one of the more unpleasant. Still, it beats three weeks on a ventilator and waking up with a lung transplant.
    5 points
  46. Veritas shooting board and lie Nielsen honing guide. Bought both second hand. LN used but looks to be in great condition. Shooting board was nib. I got the shooting plane a couple years ago well before they even made the shooting board but I kind of forgot about it and sat unused till I got around to making a shooting board. Turns out I was just waiting for LV to make one for me lol
    5 points
  47. Another short burst in tbe shop. I stuck my template to a frame blank, and bandsawed to within 1/8" or so. Then it was time to put my newest router to the test. Can't say I'm disappointed. This is my first battery powered palm-sized router, and it worked beautifully. Easy to balance, plenty of power for the task. I don't have a pattern bit long enough for the stock thickness, so I made one pass with the shank-bearing bit against the template, then flipped the part and did the opposite face with an end-bearing bit that referenced the earlier trimmed edge. Worked like
    5 points
  48. Now for the top. I started by making the curved piece that will hold the glass. To do this, the first thing I did was to make a template with my cnc. Because my cnc is small, I made it in two parts and glued it together. Once I had that made, I was ready to start making the form. I glued some mdf together. I couldn't glue all of it together at once because my flush trim bit wan't tall enough. I traced the shape and took it over to the band saw and rough cut the shape. Once that was done I took it over to the router and flush trimmed it. Once that
    5 points
  49. I went to Acme and took a look at the options. The lack of onboard bit storage was a no go on the Bosch other wise it was a good contender. They had a "new" model that looked the same as the old model. The benefit there was the old model was on sale for $150 but out of stock. The new model was exactly the same price as the Milwaukee. Summary: The Festool CXS was a solid contender but the price and new battery system was a knock and I would be ok spending a bit more to stay in an existing battery system but not to take on a full new system. The Festool C 18 was easily twice the s
    5 points
  50. I've upholstered a couple of simple square foam seats before, but this was my first shot at something substantial, with curves and springs and welted cushions and all the rest. As for learning ... youtube all the way ... there's loads of people making vids of reupholstering chairs and cushions. It's not quite as complicated as it looks once you get going ... and sewing has similarities with woodwork: at it's most basic it's just cutting raw stock down to shape, and then a bit of joinery to attach the pieces together. The hardest part was actually the design of the skeleton, knowing w
    5 points