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  1. I know that I haven't been very active on the forum lately but I have been in the shop. Here are a few pics of my completed project. And a hidden compartment. Next Project will be a table to set it on. Think I will incorporate Cabriole legs - something new each project. I'll try to look in on you guys more often.
    14 points
  2. I have a friend that I play softball with who asked me if I wold make a baseball holder. He asked if I could make something like this. Unfortunately, I was unable to make him one like that. I did find some time to make him one though. It is made from Bubinga veneer and Cherry. Finished with Arm-R-Seal satin.
    12 points
  3. So some of you may remember that a while back, I posted about having bought a couple of 15” x 3.5” x 9’ long chestnut planks that my neighbor found while visiting a friend in Ohio. The reason she knew they were chestnut was because a cardboard sign stapled to them said they were and were from a 200 yo log cabin. Proof enough, right? She agreed to buy them for me and tote them back to Houston. The two planks at one time were one and someone sawed them length ways in half down the middle. They each weighed about 90# and had hewn marks on one side. After cutting a slice from the end of one and posting a pic, @phinds quickly confirmed them not to be chestnut but probably white oak. This is what one side of each looked like. Having no idea what I was going to do with them had they been Chestnut, I was really at a loss as to what I would do with them as white oak as I didn’t need another fireplace mantle or bench. So I took them to a small sawmill to become more manageable. After taking them off the saw, I was more depressed than before I had them cut. With encouragement from some of you on here, I decided to try and separate the firewood from any salvageable pieces. One of the boards off the mill was cut a little over 2” thick and the other 4 @ 1”. After having said all of this, I thought I had enough workable wood to build a table for our patio. I found this in FWW by Michael Pekovich and decided I would give it a shot. Hopefully the rest of this build is not as long winded as this has been.
    10 points
  4. And finally got the box done that goes to the underaged groomsmen for the wedding Simple little box with a sliding/removable tray made from walnut and maple. It was my first time using a flocking a kit (don’t look too closely at the tray….) but overall I think it turned out pretty good. Hope y’all enjoy. Cheers! Luke
    10 points
  5. Lost my wife's oldest brother to COVID a few days ago. Not really what I wanted for a first project but the shop is functional so we offered. Its been a couple of years and my automatic actions and muscle memory are sleepy so I did a mock up in poplar. This let me shake some of the cobwebs loose as well as get a go-ahead on the basic design. With that out of the way I got to go through some material for the first time in too long. Chose some sapele and some birds-eye maple. Those who have an i-box are familiar with the rooster tail of spoil that can get ejected out of the rear. The mock up left a snow drift of spoil behind the saw despite dust collection. I decided to do a field mod on the i-box. Locate one post piece from an old monitor stand (they came with multiple post pieces that stacked for different heights). Bore a matching hole of an appropriate depth. Attach shop vac. Much less spoil on the floor after the same operations with the sapele. . I normally cut the dados for the top and or bottoms of such things by dry fitting the carcass and running it around a bit like this on the router table. I don't want to put the finger joints together and take them apart a lot so I will use this. Since the sides are all the same width the same setup can be used for through and stopped dados. I mill the profiles on the blank for the top. . I failed to use the push block on the first cut. Although I thought I had good control of the material the depth was a little irregular on that cut. Shoulder plane to the rescue. Reminder to self . . . consistent methods yield consistent results. At any rate, three sides are in the clamps. This gives you an idea of the joinery profile of the floating top. The sides will get tapered top and bottom but not quite as much as in the prototype. My target for the reveal around the 'top panel' to 'top of sides' is about 1/16". We'll see how I do with that.
    10 points
  6. Not up to my usual journal-type posts but, I am still just getting warmed up after a 2 year hiatus . One of these goes to a neighbor who just had a birthday. The other two will find homes during Christmas I bet. Below order, left to right is Peruvian Walnut, Black Walnut and Sapele. The inner frame on the left is Curly Maple. The other two are Tiger Maple. Finish is a Transtint Medium Brown wash on the outer frames and ARS as a topcoat on everything.
    9 points
  7. Cleaning out an old chest of drawers, filled with old pictures, and such today. I ran across this newspaper clipping from 1959. This was my first model car contest, when I was 9 years old (boy on the right). The boy that finished second was helped by his Dad. I had no help. I was getting 25 cents a week allowance, and saved up for car kits, paint, and bits, and pieces. Engines were wired with sewing thread. I won every contest I ever entered after that, too.
    9 points
  8. Hope all my ww friends have a great thanksgiving!!
    8 points
  9. Got word my truck has finally been delivered to the dealership after a 4 month wait, flying out Friday to drive it back :)
    8 points
  10. I got Cody to pose with the 'War Hammer'. Gun-blued the spike as Dave suggested, but left the walnut Danish oil on the shaft. Added a rubber cane tip.
    8 points
  11. With the glue dry and out of the clamps, I trimmed the top of the legs to match the curves of the top rails. Mr. Pekovich’s article uses three screws per support rail to attach the top. With his being in a climate controlled environment, this may be well and good for wood movement. As mine will outside, I decided on one screw in the middle of each support and figure eights on the outsides. After going a bit overboard with the figure eights, I eliminated the screws altogether. After some final sanding, I applied the Teak Oil per directions. Flood the wood and wipe dry after about 30 minutes. The color is not as clear as an indoor finish but not as orangish as some outdoor finishes I’ve used. However, due to the late evening sun, the pics don’t indicate that. The downside of the top and then the show side. And finally, this is where it will live. Thanks all for following and for your comments.
    8 points
  12. As promised, a photo of the mirror in place. Sorry for the perspective, the entry hall isn't all that wide. I am particularly happy with how my in-frame hanging groove worked out. With two #10 deck screws into wall studs, the frame hangs tight to the wall, and is in no danger of dropping, although it weighs at least 30lb, by my estimate. Thanks for following along! I'd be interesting in hearing what you might have done differently, and why. Its all a learning experience.
    8 points
  13. One of the shop managers keeping rabbits and people off the lawn while I’m laid up for a couple days. He’s a good boy.
    8 points
  14. Hijacking someone else’s thread again but hopefully @Chet won’t mind. The original shipping box for my miter box and saw was about 4”x12” x 2” high. I figured as small as it was, there was a possibility that in my shop, it could get damaged or greater still, lost. So I decided to build it a new home.
    7 points
  15. It's been a while but work has continued on the bathroom and laundry room remodel. I'll share some interesting circumstances that have occurred. I made a frame and panel side. The carcass was joined with 4mm dominoes. Thoughts were running through my mind constantly about over building these cabinets. The ones removed were well made but were particle baord and nails. These are Baltic birch glued and with joinery. Got it hung Next up is doors for the cabinet opposite this one. The openings are an awkward width where a single door would be too wide but double doors is too narrow to do the style I want. So i altered the design and went with a single panel instead of 2. I messed up my measurements though. The right opening was 1/4" larger than the left opening. I made all 4 doors the same size and unfortuneatly used the smaller opening measurements. To make the doors fit with out a comicaly large gap I cut 4 1/16" strips and glued them to the edge of the door. Once they were cleaned up it became difficult to tell they were there. The picture below shows the worst case where there was a small gap. This is luckily on the inside of the door. Once finish was appiled the strip disappeared even more. I used euro hinges. I've also had issue getting the cups at the perfect distance from the door edge. It seems like no matter what kind of jig i used the hole would drift 1/32" or so. A small amount but with3/32" gaps it makes a very noticeable difference. This time i used my marking gauge to set the center of the cup from the edge of the door. This worked really well. it gave the forstner bit some purchase so that it didn't drift. All finished up with the doors hung. I had to for other reasons use 1/8" gap instead of 3/32". I should note that with inset doors I always make them over sized and trim them to the opening. This allows me to account for any out of squareness that may have occurred. It also gives me a better change of nailing a consistent gap. It's too bad this awful cherry is so blotchy .... it distracts me when i should be folding laundry.
    7 points
  16. I liked the looks of the table top of the one I’m building off of in the initial pic with the squared edges so I chose not to do a bevel on the underside. With the top cut to final dimensions, I cleaned the edges with a block plane and a sanding block. I am sanding everything only to 150 with the idea that it will absorb the Teak Oil better than if I went to a higher grit. I may be way off base, only an assumption. I put a slight bevel on the ends of all the thru tenons and assembled the top support rails to the front and back rails. Sorry, forgot to take picks. Next up is the bottom shelf. I definitely like Mr. Pekovich’s simple design without a shelf but as mine will be used and not viewed, I chose functionality over beauty. Also, where this will live will be against an outside wall of the house, under the patio, there is our only receptacle. I had to choose to raise the shelf to a desired height or lower it for accessibility and I lowered it. At this point, I was out of any usable wood and had to go to the lumber super market to find that flat sawn white oak was $12 something a bf. Hard as hell hickory was $3 something so, I picked up a few bf of it. Not a bad choice color and contrast wise but ruff on cutting blades. After milling these pieces down to desired, I attached the slats, outside vertical and inside horizontal, to the bottom end rails, using Domino’s When the glue dried, I needed a schedule of events for assembly. I found that if I laid the bottom shelf on a couple of saw horses and attached a leg to it, it would clear the floor. Doing a dry fit, I attached a leg to the shelf, added the upper end rail and then the second leg, that this would work. I did the same to the other end. The upper front and back rail assembly with the support rails would drop in nicely from the top into the bridle joint mortises on the legs. I disassembled the parts and with TB III, I put it all back together with appropriate clamps. The upper front and back rails were attached to the legs with draw bore pins. I saw no reason to do the same with the end rails and added simple thru dowel pins to attach these. I inverted the whole assembly and with a dam formed with blue tape, I added a thin layer of epoxy to the bottom of the legs for good behavior!
    7 points
  17. In the process of finishing out the offcut to make a charcuterie slab. Sanded with Abranet to 600 then wipeon Watco Teak Oil. First time I tried Abranet on my orbital sander, amazing how much faster it cut than the other paper.
    7 points
  18. First coat of ARS. I want to move toward waterborne products. However, I didn't think a first project with a time sensitivity was the place to practice .
    7 points
  19. Celebrated my 38th birthday today. Didn’t get any shop time, but did get a couple of woodworking related gifts.
    7 points
  20. All done and transported to the guest room. Added a bit of thin leather on the front corners as a bump stop.
    7 points
  21. @Chet I use clear shellac ;-) Seems odd to be this far along and still not be sure how the base is going to look. I have some cast metal feet that may work well. Regardless I have to make it so that someone else will be able to easily place the ashes inside. When I place the ashes for people I just seal the bottom permanently. In this case there is some degree of unknown so I need to make a serviceable bottom. I use a wheel gauge to score the fibers for a rabbet. I use this small bit for a good reason. The small diameter leaves very little to clean up in the corners. Not trying to make this a Veritas advertisement but, these are what I use to set a consistent reveal around the top panel. It's handy to have a white pencil for working on darker woods. Here is the low down on how I taper the sides. I have to show you the mock up . . . Because Captain "I-haven't-had-a-shop-for-2-years" decided to install the top instead of dry fitting for this step and exceeded his bandsaw capacity . Normally I would cut all four lower faces. Then flip it over and cut the upper faces. You use the off-cuts to fill in between the already cut area and the fence once that becomes necessary. Due to my oversight however, I will be edge sanding this thing into submission. How did I ever live without a wide edge sander!?! The orange tape with the arc on it will explain itself in a minute. I find the path to success often involves me protecting myself from myself so I double wrap the top with tape. The theory being that if I "whoops" I will scuff the tape, not the birds-eye and not have to start from scratch . . . no pun intended. After some initial shaping of one side you can see what the tape is for. Since I am essentially free-handing this I need a constant reference check. This is all four side fresh off the 80 grit. A little finer hand sanding and some card scraper work gets me here. I need to percolate a bit on the base, make a decision, make the base, and get some finish on this guy.
    7 points
  22. On my last bench build, I had to add a 2” long piece to the legs for a comfortable fit. It was from contrasting wood and I kind of liked the look. So on the table, I added the cuffs by design by cutting the legs 2” shy of intended. As the legs were too long to be drilled in the dp, I used a dowel drilling jig from Rockler. This jig was set up for 3/4” stock so, I cut a spacer to center it on my legs. The cuffs were drilled out on the dp. Using some 3/8” stainless steel rod as dowels, I epoxied them into place with blue tape to secure them. After the epoxy cured, I used a block plane and sanding block to bring them to the right dimension. I think the next step will to build the table-top base.
    7 points
  23. I keep wanting to pick up that Milwaukee drill or the impact/drill kit but I don’t really need it. Maybe I’ll find an excuse. Found this at Habitat for Humanity Restore for $10. Also got these in from Rockler this week and already fixed my jointer issues. Need to check on some longer boards but I think it’s functional again.
    7 points
  24. Yes it is, from Woodcraft took almost 6 mo to get though. Once I have used it for a bit I will do a quick review. And with a coat of Tried and True its a wrap From this:
    7 points
  25. Thank all. I spent many years in barely adequate shops. I did all those things we do to fit more stuff in a small space and it was great. The wife and I have had a goal for nearly 20 years and the new shop was part of that. With no intention of boasting or feeling full of myself I have to say that EVERY time I can walk from one area in the shop to another without sashaying around a jutting jointer table or performing some sort of choreographed maneuver to avoid barking my shins on a tool stand leg . . . I do feel giddy, I do want to pinch myself, and it really is a dream come true . Some folks retire and tour Europe, buy a boat, a vacation home, or a pair of Harley's . . . I bought a shop .
    6 points
  26. A small piece of spalted elm was the intended piece. It was thick enough that I resawed it to hopefully get the continuous grain wrap. As my piece was not very wide, the box was not going to be as large as the eventual one. After using my small parts sled designed with the 90* cut on one end and a 45* on the other end, I used your idea of using the removable stop block that you showed in one of your post. The design was to be like a small pencil box with a sliding lid.After making all of the cuts and grooves, a dry fit revealed that I used my id dimensions as my od dimensions and the box was 1” too short and 1” too narrow, due to the 1/2” thickness of the board pieces. As it was too long to make a pencil box, I cut the sides down which left me with grain match on only two corners. Now I have a sliding lid pencil box!
    6 points
  27. Finally installed. Net fit wall to wall is always demanding. Plus it was up 2 flights of stairs. Elevator not operating. Tools alone wore me out up and down the stairs. I love walnut. I was not the installer, I was the helper. The man is an expert and knows all the tricks. He makes my work look better. Inexpensive materials installed well looks better than expensive materials installed poorly. This job has both. I only work full days when installing. Especially with this installer. Him and the owner have no interest in 2 or 3 hours a day. So this is when I put in a full day. If this becomes well decorated by the homeowner and I get to see it I will take some more pictures. The man of this office has a lot of sports memorabilia . PS. The bottom drawer almost was a problem. I'm told much too late that the base boards are 10". The bottom drawer has just enough clearance to not be a problem. This is a high price construction. An arcatect should have been employed to avoid miscues like that. But I'd rather be lucky than good... sometimes.
    6 points
  28. They may only be frames but it feels good to be doing something
    6 points
  29. Look in the drawer labeled “Label Maker” That should always be the first label printed!
    6 points
  30. The remaining 4 slabs of wood will hopefully produces enough wood for the remainder of the table. I concentrated on getting the boards for the top first and hopefully the off cuts will produce the thinner pieces. After several layout tries with a piece of chalk, I think I will have just enough for the top. I rough cut these boards and jointed and planed them to 1” and stickered them. Using the same method, I milled the boards for the rails and supports to 3/4” and cut them to rough lengths. The front and back rails will receive an arch but for reference points to cut the mortises for the thru tenons on the support rails, I will cut them later. As I didn’t want to go back and forth from a standard blade to the dado stack, I notched the tenon thickness and the shoulder lines of the front, back and end rails on the ts using a flat tooth blade. That was a chore and I wish I hadn’t been so lazy. Shown are the end rails. Then I dry fitted the front, back and upper end rails to the legs and drilled them for the draw bore pins. This dry fit also allowed me to get the exact shoulder-shoulder length of the support rails. After breaking these pieces apart, I laid out the mortises for the thru tenons for the three top support rails. I removed the majority of the waste with a Fortsner bit and used a chisel to square up the mortises. The cove on the tops of the supports was originally cut at 1/2” radius but as my table is several inches taller than the original build, I cut mine at 1 1/8” using a hole saw and removed the waste on the bs. I cleaned these up on the oscillating spindle sander. With the edges of the front and back rails still straight, I referenced off of the bottom edge to locate the tenons on the supports and cut them with a backsaw and cleaned them up with a chisel. More to come.
    6 points
  31. Football today, so shoptime for me! Since the dowels were a bust, I rigged a fence on my router and made slots. I trimmed some offcut to the same width to make some loose tenons. I use a sacrificial hook on my wide push stick, to push the work completely through. Never shoots back. I had to work on the miters with a plane, remember the bow I discovered in my sled fence. Tedious work, but it came out ok. Glue-up of mitered frames is a hair-pulling endeavor. Without a flat surface bigger than the frame, I had to dance around a lot to get it all together, finally pulling the corners tight with this clamp arrangement. Of course, I immediately realised I had forgotton to include any means of locking the glass into the rabbet. Doh! So, while the glue dried, I cut some more scrap into 1.5" segments... ... made a jig to hold the pieces in my drill press... ... and after routing out a series of pockets around the rabbet, I now have clips to hold the mirror in. Whew!
    6 points
  32. Thanks guys. Just as some fodder for finishing discussions . . . Here's a shot of the top after the first flood of shellac. There are a lot of ways to make figure pop and I use a lot of them. When I want to keep things light but still get some eye candy (like birds-eye and tiger maple) I do a flood-like application of a 1lb cut of shellac. The thinner mix carries the shellac deep into the softer woods and I wipe the excess off quickly. This is after that first step. I then just use what ever the top coat will be for the main project. If you add more coats of shellac, the contrast gets weak as the base coat takes on a more amber tone. Here's another example from a past project. Not quite as in-your-face as some dye techniques but definitely there.
    6 points
  33. Dear Santa - I have been a very good boy this year. For Christmas, could I please have one of those excavators that you let Tom play with? I'll be sure to leave extra cookies for you. Robby
    5 points
  34. Yesterday, and today, I supervised a Cat 320 operator. I've been after heavy equipment contractors about getting a day's work for a large excavator for almost a year. They've either not wanted to bother with a small job, or were waiting for parts they couldn't get. Finally, one had an operator who wanted to work over Thanksgiving weekend, so he showed up at 2:30 yesterday, worked until dark, and came back this morning, quitting at 2:30 today. The Cat 320 weighs 27 tons. When it pulls on something, that something moves. I had some large stumps down on our point that I didn't want to take the time required with a small, rental unit. This guy pulled them right out. The 65 ton lowboy was as easy to load, and unload off of as my gooseneck trailer is. The front of the trailer stays attached to the Semi Tractor, and separates from the trailer, after lowering the front onto the ground. He unloaded, and loaded as fast as I can load my mower, or tractor on my gooseneck. He worked for 2-1/2 hours yesterday down on the point, getting up all the rest of the stumps, and taking down a few more trees I wanted to take out. Today, he dug up a mountain of topsoil that I'm going to get another guy to come screen with a big trommel dirt screen. I have a place I've been letting people dump leaves for 40 years, and dumping stuff I cleared off of lots when I was building houses. We dug a test hole, to see about how deep it is, and he couldn't hit bottom. It looks like it's over 8 feet deep, on average, over about 3/4's of an acre. He piled that up for me until he decided to quit. He might have dug up 25% of what I have. It's full of fat earthworms. I easily have enough, just from what he piled up today, to put 2 or 3 inches on the whole 2 acre point. That should grow grass. A single axle dump truck load of topsoil goes for $250. Judging by that, this is well over 25k worth. Not exactly what I wanted to be doing this weekend, but I was glad to get it done, finally.
    5 points
  35. I thought I posted this way-back-when under one of my "Random Tips" rambles I get on now and then but cannot find it. This was just going to be a "hey I made some more of these" thread but just in case I really didn't post them before, here goes . . . You dig through the scrap bin and find a small panel and some scrap that can be cut into a triangle profile as shown. Glue the triangle strip on one edge or on both edges if your panel is large enough. I end up with an item that is about 7" long when completely done. Slice it into 1-1/4" wide strips on the table saw. Cut those strips in half and add a hole to hang or string them on when not in use. Cut some abrasive strips. I use 400 grit but anything down to about 220 is fine. Once you get coarser than that you risk damaging the frame part surfaces. Stick the abrasive strips onto the thing-a-ma-bobs. And you use them like so. I had a batch of these but cannot find them post-move (yet) and so whipped up another batch this morning.
    5 points
  36. Project journals are pretty boring without pics. Here’s the table saw sled I put together the last couple of nights. Hopefully tonight or tomorrow morning I can square it up and be ready to make the cuts for the case. Also cleaned out the table saw since it was full of dust. The port at the bottom got clogged so hooking up the dust collector was even more pointless than normal.
    5 points
  37. @Mark J I am not taking it completely apart. the cubby holes backing is broken so I have to take the tambour off to fix that. this is it as far as I will take apart. everything I have taken off is tounge and groove no nails or screws I will be cleaning and refinishing. from here. I like the idea of the scot pads. im not sure about anything else grandpa and I restored it with sandpaper murpheys old English and alot of elbow grease. we did have to rebuild a tambour for it but I will be putting new canvas on it for a smoother roll after all these years of scraping on the broken backing. I will keep you allow to date
    5 points
  38. It is pretty tasty, I help my Norwegian bride with the making of Lefse and Kringle most every year. Quartersawn sycamore works for a lefse turner also.
    5 points
  39. I mis-spoke the sled is more like 15+ inches from the fence. I would say you could "safely" cut 16 inches. I have a SawStop PCS and I use the fixture below to rest the sled on to start the cut. It keeps it from tipping at the beginning. I got the idea from @gee-dub.
    5 points
  40. Thanks everyone. I factored a lot of your suggestions in and ended up here. First I should mention that I don't know how I got along without a laser level. This one was reasonable but lacks a gimbal-lock and other things a pro might want. It has been invaluable in the shop build. I thought about a lot of variations, orientations, and so on but, this seems like the best fit for my shop.
    5 points
  41. Hung out in a tree.... a Hopefully I'll see something big. Worst case sunset and sun rise have been beautiful.
    5 points
  42. Now that I’m retired, I get up when the dog whines and go to bed when I get ready and beer time is somewhere in between. The correct time is only important for my doc visits and that is usually for his sake and not mine!
    5 points
  43. My table tilts both ways. I'm sorry for not having action shots of this. I figured when I did the mock up that I would take pictures of that process with the real version. I didn't plan on shooting myself in the foot. I tilt the table with the edge nearest the spine dropping down. My saw will tilt 5 degrees to the left and 45 degrees to the right. The tilt for the tapered cuts (made with the blank standing vertically) is about 3 degrees . . . I just went back out to the shop and staged these two shots so they are not the actual process. Once the first two faces are cut and you rotate to cut the third and fourth the reference surface that rides the fence is not true. You can see where I have wedged the off-cuts into the void to add some stability. Once the four lower cuts are made you flip the blank (if you haven't already added the top like a dingbat that is) and make the remaining four cuts. Either with the bandsaw cuts or without a trip to the edge sander is in order. With the taper cuts at the bandsaw there is a lot less to sand and keeping things consistent is a lot easier. Did this all make better sense?
    5 points
  44. Since this will go on the patio and be used as sort of a buffet serving table when we do cookouts, I will be putting a shelf below made of slats. There will be 4 end rails and these will attach to the legs with thru tenons. I cut the mortises with the dedicated mortiser. There are some cracks on a couple of the legs that I thought I had better address. Instead of cutting a bunch of butterflies, I decided on bandaids. I notched out the areas on the ts and cut the filler strips to fit. With a block plane, I shaved them down and lightly sanded them flush with the legs. There are still a few problem areas and I will fill them later with epoxy.
    5 points
  45. The legs, being 1.5” square, had to somehow come out of the 2” thick board. This board had a huge crack down the middle so I made my first cut, separating the two halves and as one of the pics above show, I used my handy dandy Milwaukee Fuel jig saw and a heavy duty Bosch blade ( thanks Chet) instead of my old unconventional method, risking life and limb, with the circ saw. I then cut these in half length ways, using the same saw. From there, it was back and forth from the band saw to the jointer to get them close to dimensions and using the planer, got them to the desired 1.5”. The legs are attached to the rails via bridle joints so I laid these out, scribing the baseline of the slot. I then cut the sides on the bs, flipping it 180* to insure that the slot was centered. Using a 1/2” Fortsner bit at the baseline, released most of the waste. I then squared the base of the slot with a chisel. All four done.
    5 points
  46. I was reading an old thread on another forum and someone had mentioned an assist tool made by Jet for loading drum sander paper. I had never heard of the JET 98-0060 Tuftool. I rarely have trouble with the Supermax 19-38 clip but was curious. Using the pictures in the manual as a reference I formed one up using some hard steel wire. I have some heavier wire I figured I would use if I could figure it out. Turns out the 18"-ish wire is plenty stout. The theory is that a little hook grabs the lever that folks with larger hands can have a hard time getting a hold of. You then pull up the lever which raises the clip lever and opens the clip. You then rotate the tool counter-clockwise so the horizontal bend is over the drum (also pinching the loose end of the paper if you like), and you can let go. This gives you two hands to finesse the end of the abrasive into the throat of the inboard clip. Once the paper is threaded you rotate the clip clockwise and release the tension allowing the clip to grab the abrasive. Disclaimer: I am no metal worker by any stretch . . . This will be obvious from looking at the pics. . . It only took a few minutes to bend the wire and it makes an already easy job (I have small hands) even easier
    4 points
  47. Well, Here is what the two pieces of 3/8" look like installed on the counter. The profile was cut with a 30 degree chamfer bit. It was a bear to mount it. I had to drill on an angle before I mounted it threw the face of the counter at an angle so a 2.5" #8 would pull in enough not to be seen after breaking off several screw head till I went to #9 and broke the heads of a couple of them then I went to #10's. You need to use star head screws - Philips forget about it...
    4 points
  48. I received this notice through one of the clubs I belong to. I am assuming it's OK with Brusso that I share: Brusso supports woodworkers by being the premier manufacturer of hardware for fine boxes, cabinetry, furniture, and woodworking. Our hardware is one of a kind and we work hard to make it. Use the Coupon Code: THANKS21 to get $15 per pair which applies only to CB-301 and JB-101. Details: The sale will last from 12:00 AM EST on 11/25/21 until 11:59 PM EST on 11/26/21. Sale applies only to online orders at Brusso.com Promotion does not apply to phone orders, distributor sales, custom items, or items already marked down. Depending on inventory and availability, orders may take up to 4 weeks to be fulfilled.
    4 points
  49. I just want to clear mine off..
    4 points
  50. I'll try not to take over the thread but, I didn't post a thread on this bench for whatever reason. Otherwise I would just link to it. This was an evolution from things learned up till mid-2015 when I built it. Previous benches were varied but the immediate predecessor was 4 layers of 3/4" MDF. This worked great but required too such support IMHO. Current bench is 2 laminated layers of 3/4" BB ply with 2 layers of 3/4" MDF laminated on top. This is adequately self supporting. The top is coated with BLO and then paste waxed. I refresh the wax every year or so. Here it is after about 3 years of abuse. I find the MDF tops really rugged when BLO'd and waxed. The dog holes are used a lot and have never failed. I do chamfer about 1/8" around them to keep any sharp edges from crushing under stress. The top is anchored by large dowels driven up from underneath. You will see this method in a number of bench books. I run a LV large twin screw on the front and a LV small twin screw at the end. A bit of leather or cork on the chop only give me just the amount of grip I am after. The base is made of poplar as were previous benches. It holds up well, is inexpensive and colors nicely over time. The top is wrapped in maple and the vise chops are made of the same. The levelers are 3/8" screwed into t-nuts. These in turn stand on metal plates made for machines on concrete (really just stamped 1/8" steel with a sort of cup pressed into them to keep them centered on the foot). We now return you to your regularly scheduled program.
    4 points