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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/13/2022 in Posts

  1. We welcomed our daughter Hazel into the world this morning at 2:14am. So kinda sorta has nut in the name? The name originated from the Hazelnut tree. Following your post I put the name on the list and Megan fell in love with it. Now it's on the birth certificate so it's official.
    13 points
  2. Well, you ain’t going to believe this…I still can’t believe it. The backstory is that several (7?) years ago I watched a fellow woodworker buy a Rinkon 20” bandsaw for ~$1200 on an auction here in town and I thought “someday, I’m going to have one too”. So the hunt began for a large 16”+ bandsaw that could be used for resawing, but I’m cheap and didn’t want to spend as much as Steve did. This weekend P and went to an auction 90 minutes away and stood in the blistering heat for 5 hours to watch some woodworking tools sell. The auction had a Woodmaster 24” drum sander, a 3Hp UniSaw, a Grizzly shaper and lathe with copier, and (most importantly) a 18” Jet bandsaw. Well, we goofed…we should have bought the drum sander ($350), the UniSaw ($475 with outfeed table) and the lathe ($350)…but they hadn’t sold the bandsaw yet. We ended up winning the bandsaw for $450. Yes, I said four hundred and fifty dollars for a $3000 bandsaw…with 3 resaw blades (a ¾”, a 1”, and a 1.25”). Tuned ‘er up quick last night and cut a skinny 1/16” veneer out of a block of maple. Whoa, this thing is cool. Let’s just say that there’s a strong chance of seeing more book matched panels in our future projects. Oh, and I bought a OIT floor-model drill press for $100 and 5 pieces of 24 x 36 mirror glass for $3 (total). The mirror glass is slated for an upcoming Mission bathroom mirror build. You can see the drill press in the bottom-right corner of the picture. All-in-all a great day for us boys.
    10 points
  3. I needed a series of holes in a piece of pipe. I have made other repeating patterns the same way. Basically a piece of scrap cut to some shape that you can clamp to your drill press. I happen to have a t-track on top of my DP fence so I drilled a couple of holes and used t-bolts. A hole is drilled to accept a nail or dowel that is about the same size as the holes you need to drill. Position the pin the distance from the drill bit that equals the spacing you want. About an inch in my case. Drill your first hole free hand, slide your stock over until the nail or pin drops into this hole. Drill you next hole. Rinse and repeat. I have cobbled together more refined versions of this for shelf pin holes or dowel holes. I just thought I'd share a quicky geriatric engineered repeating indexing method.
    9 points
  4. As I’m not the lucky person in Illinois that won the lotto, I retreated back to the shop this weekend. As the sub-top is solid 3/4 lumber, I decided to turn it into essentially a web frame and lightened the weight by 3-4 lbs. I got all of the legs cut and shaped to size. As I mentioned, these are laminated to give me a full 1.5” and the glue line on three were really noticeable. Thanks to @Mick S and more recently, @gee-dub for the cover the glue line face with a thin veneer trick. Thanks to my drum sander, I was able to get the veneer down to 1/32” and bevel the edges down to the glue line which covered it nicely. Side view and veneered side. The legs are attached to the side of the cabinet with Dominos and glue. Thanks to my handy little guide, the legs extend past the front and back by 1/4”. I’ll leave the clamps on overnight. Tomorrow, I’ll start on the walnut top.
    8 points
  5. MFT style torsion box that fits on my adjustable height husky table. I’ll cut out between the large holes on the front to allow for clamps. ~1.5” overhang on the sides to also allow for clamps. I have some dogs and planing stops to go with it, and my matchfit clamps will fit in the holes for surface clamping away from the edges. 3/4” ply that I had left from an abandoned project and a few scraps. Not sure if I’ll like it but worth giving it a shot.
    8 points
  6. Made a battling top set for the grandkids
    8 points
  7. Went and bought a couple of kayaks. Long weekends of camping and yak’n in the near future Excise the mess in the garage…. Cheers Mates!
    8 points
  8. One of the last things to be completed for the dresser was to create some dividers for the main drawers. This was discussed but never implemented as we were unsure what kind and size of dividers we'd need. After loading the drawers up pretty good I came up with a plan. My plan was to make a drawer outline from 1/4" BB ply and then use some thin 4mm ply as drop in dividers. This was a great use for the kerf master. I measured 3 times and cut 1 sheet for the front back and middle dividers. I used the kerf master and my table saw fence to make loose grooves in theply. Then it was as simple as cutting to size and getting everything fit. I made some extra dividers just in case. Then put the drawers in place and megan loaded them back up. I put extra grooves in the holders to account for future use so dividers can be removed and put in a different groove depending on what goes in the drawer. This worked extremely well and was relatively quick to complete. I'll need to do this on megan's main dresser as well the dividers i made for here were more temporary.
    8 points
  9. After about a month break i made it back into my shop for a quick project. Megan needed a table for mid night feeding sessions to set items. We have a char set up in our bedroom but no good side table. Beings that this is a temporary use I just threw together a base out of birch scraps and 2x4s. The top was salvaged and stored from a previous project. Hazel is for all intents and purposes sleeping through the night, in 2 hour shifts with feedings in between. This results in waking up 3 times a night to change the diaper and feed.
    7 points
  10. Finished. Just need to secure it to the bench. Then clean up the mess!
    7 points
  11. An electric bike. 8 amps of lithium. It tops out at 20 mph. A folder. Aluminum frame. It came completely built and folded. Nicely equipped. Head light and tail light are wired into the main battery. It will go more that 20 miles on a charge. I am impressed by the quality and components. Have riden it for just one mile. I got it last night in the mail. My first ride was this morning because the battery had to be charged. There is a hidden key that turns the battery off. A rear rack and a bike lock are in transit. The bike was $800 plus tax. including freight. With some bling and tax mine was $1135.
    7 points
  12. well since i cut my thumb in half and while that heals we did some short trips, St Francis Basilica in Dyresville Iowa, watched a barge at Lock and Dam #11 lock thru, went to a granddaughters baseball game and a very appropriate sign on the fence and lastly the view at the end of our street about 50 yards away
    7 points
  13. I was a bit of an audiophile back in the 70s and 80s. The high end stuff is all gone but I still have a grip of random gear. With Father Time robbing me of my more discerning hearing my musical needs are not what they once were. Streaming music at a reasonable volume will do . While relocating "stuff" I stumbled over a pair of Polks that were a step or two up from my current rear channel speakers in the shop. A random piece of particle board yielded some quick speaker stands and . . . Before. After. My apologies in advance to the neighbors.
    7 points
  14. When I am off work from the shop, I either spend my relaxation time watching my favorite baseball team, or sim racing. Racing on PC simulation software has been a hobby of mine since 1994. For the longest time I have wanted a dedicated area for playing PC racing simulations. I decided to go with a combination of wood and metal in its construction. I made the side panels from nine-ply plywood, and the roof panels are 1/4" MDF. The free standing panels are used to block any distractions from underneath the side monitors are 1/4-inch plywood panels attached to aluminum profile. The silly, and unnecessary spoiler was once there to protect the rear speakers from being bumped. I have since moved the 7.1 rear speakers closer to ear level and just kept the plywood spoiler for effect and the absurdity of it all. The variable-speed 175 C.F.M. ventilation system is very much needed as the three 32" monitors and the 23" overhead monitor generate a great bit of heat very quickly and sustains making heat. Once the curtain is closed the heat is trapped in the cockpit so it needs to be vented out and gets recirculated into the dashboard vents. The blackout curtain is needed to stop reflections from behind me. Being in front of the three monitors is like a triple dressing mirror, with reflections from all sides just bouncing off each surface. The black backdrop helps to minimize those reflections, and eliminated the distractions from outside the cockpit (four cats and a dog). Some internet races are usually 45 minutes to an hour in length, and as long as 2.4 hours in duration, so comfort and accessibility to controls is a premium consideration. The aluminum profile allowed me to tweak the location of everything by sliding things in the channels, and the plywood panels allowed me to lock things in place. Everything is placed for my comfort and ergonomics, so guest just have to put up without a seat slider or tilt steering wheel. There are two 1000 watt per channel amplifiers overhead, (which I can access overhead like a NASA capsule), and they power Buttkicker brand transducers which shake the driver seat from underneath and in the lumbar area, and the left and right sides of the pedals plate. The wheel motor has 20Nm of torque available for the force feedback haptics, which can be quite jolting during a crash. The pedal system has incredible feel and adaptability to give a true-to-life feel during use. The sequential shifter is a top notch built piece of kit. All of it is way too much fun, and has been a great distraction in the workshop as my weekend project built in the shop for me. Well, I am off to cut some hot laps at Spa-Francorchamps in Belgium.
    7 points
  15. I needed to get the last of the lumber out of the garage. I started in the shop and pulled all the <9' stuff down out of the horizontal racks. I cleared a spot for more vertical storage. I moved the >9' stuff from the garage and threw it up in the horizontal racks. I tore down the temporary vertical rack in the garage and hauled it out to the shop. Put it up. And started to load it up. Time for some chow. I will move some more material later . . . whew.
    7 points
  16. Speaking of Kayaks, I got these, and the aluminum Grumman canoe for nothing. A real estate agent called me about a house they were selling this past Spring. Houses here sell the day they go on the market, and people are lined up to buy it. She said please come get the kayaks and canoe. The people selling the house didn't want anything there, and the real estate agent wanted to clean everything up. These were dirty, and a little old. There are some rotted straps on one of the kayak seats, but Pam has a roll of that, and industrial sewing machines. There were a bunch of paddles and life jackets too. They were right down the street from our rental house. We'll put them to use for people renting the house. I might use that canoe tomorrow to work on the dock, instead of a kayak.
    7 points
  17. After 6 weeks out of the shop due to a couple of minor medical procedures, I finally got to turn on some machines and drive again! I got all of my drawer fronts cut to size and screwed temporarily into place. I still need to raise the bottom drawer a tad. I also cut a test leg for size from some scrap. Being unable to source 8/4 lumber to match, I’ve having to laminate two pieces of 4/4 ambrosia maple that I had left for the legs. These pieces came from this board. With the grain as such, it may be hard to hide the joints which will be viewed from the sides. I got pretty lucky on this one. The legs are flared but only to the left and right and not front and back. To flare them both ways, I would have had 12/4 lumber instead of the laminated 8/4 (legs are 1.5” square at the top). To halfway compensate for this, I tapered them on the inside. I’ve not seen it done but that is my alternate. Face side. And the end side with the glue line. One down and three in the clamps.
    7 points
  18. Squared up and ready for the juice groove. I use red pencil and a drawing bow to layout the curved sides. I will route the juice groove before cutting the arcs. This gives me a straight reference edge to work from. I use a Trend Vari-Jig for this. There are variations of this type of rig and other ways of doing this. For those not familiar, this jig is designed to let you template route squares or rectangles in the middle of panels. I use it like so. I find using spring clamps makes setting up to the layout lines easier. I made some white oak "t-nuts" that allow me to use holddowns from below. Thank goodness this doesn't make a mess. Juice groove. I now cut the arcs at the bandsaw. And clean these up at the edge sander. I will do the edge profiles and grips tomorrow; time for dinner.
    7 points
  19. So decided to do a 3rd coat on the seat and a couple spots on the continuous arm Here is what I am going for Here are pics where I am not quite satisfied Ok now I am really done with the milk paint BTW you really need anti foam additive to get a good finish, this is what it looks like when you forget it. Just a couple drops mixed in and all the bubbles disappear One final light wipe down with 3000 grit ...and now the first coat of top coat Definitely pops in person definitely better then in this pic. I will try to get some better pics when done which should be in a couple days.
    7 points
  20. Last night we had dinner with 3 other couples that were all close friends in high school to plan a trip together to Spain, Portugal and Morocco. We last travelled together about 6 years ago when we spent 3-1/2 weeks in Greece and Italy. That was a fantastic vacation. We all travel together very well. We are spread out a bit and only see each other every year or two, but we all formed such a strong bond of friendship way back in the day. It has remained strong and we really enjoy each others company.
    6 points
  21. It wasn’t too bad. I was able to purchase these 3 ea. 7’ boards instead of 8’ (top will be 64” long) so less waste and there was not up charge for over 8” wide as with my other two suppliers. Although I had to rip them in half to fit my 6” jointer, at least there will be grain continuity when glued back up.
    6 points
  22. So i thought i would post an epilogue and close this out in case some of you were wondering how this came out, well after 2 trips to the hand surgeon and one more to go i get to keep the thumb , its still beat up and healing slowly and a bandage change twice a day, but the good news is i'm back in the shop ! it does not have a lot of feeling in it and the Dr says it will take a year to look like a thumb again, it looks like a thumb now just with an 1/8" kerf in it that hurts when i bump/hit it wrong and yes the first thing i made were a lot of push sticks. looking back i think my biggest mistake was that i got too comfortable around that saw, that and not using a push stick for a cut i've made thousands of times, there is a little PTSD if that's the right word, i look at that saw running and think how in the &^*$ did i stick my thumb in that running blade ? it has made me think more when making cuts, even and especially ones that i've made many, many times. if this helps even one of you think a little more about saw safety i'll be glad, and yes i've gotten some flack from my friends that own Saw Stop table saws and when this saw wears out i will consider it at the top, one because this would not have happened and two i think its a good saw
    6 points
  23. My neighbor's son was flying up to Camarillo just to put some time on a plane and asked if we would like to go. The airport restaurant there is really good so we jumped in. The ride is about 50 minutes and you pass within sight of the coast using the "small plane corridor" that is common for this run when you aren't sightseeing. Camarillo was much cooler than our area but still shorts and t-shirt weather. I had the tri-tip sandwich, bacon and beans, and sweet potato fries. LOML went for the pastrami. We hung out an hour or so. Then flew back home. The whole trip was so quick we even left the dog in the house
    6 points
  24. My first woodworking project after getting home with hazel. Needed some platins for freezing milk. Makes the bags flat and easier to stack.
    6 points
  25. I'm still dragging the last few things in from the garage. When you need a pipe clamp, you want a pipe clamp. The rest of the time mine are usually tucked out of site; a rack behind a tool box, behind a door, whatever. For the new shop I want to take advantage of the taller walls for seldom used items. These racks are simple and take up little room. I decide on the blank's dimensions and lay out for the "arms". I drill 1-1/8" holes for 3/4" pipe clamps. I gang the four blanks to saw out the space between the arms. I glue and screw vertical cleats up opposing sides of the blanks . . . sorry, no pics ;-( The racks hold 2 clamps on each arm. This is one pair. The other pair will probably go over the double doors. Then I can gather all the pipe clamps from hither and yon and bring them "home".
    6 points
  26. Took the day off to work on some projects around the house. Put in supports for our grape plants- 4x4 T on each end and one in the middle, eye screws and solid galvanized wire between. Added bird netting above the chicken wire around our chicken run, we lost a couple young hens to a coopers haws. Also tore our the awful wire shelves in our pantry and made wood shelves. Got the shelves made, fitted, and installed. Ran out of time before I could apply finish.
    6 points
  27. I found all the parts to the clamping rig. It was spread amongst 3 different buildings so it is amazing that it is all here . This rig was made from poor plywood scrounged from the dividers between pallets in truck trailers. I only mention this because this is really a version 1. It just keeps on tickin' . After a little clean up you stage the parts like so. Position the two halves of the blank with the inlay opening at the notch in the lower cauls. You will notice a lot of packing tape on surfaces. This is just an easy and disposable way of . . . best-case: keeping glue off of things it shouldn't be on or . . . worst-case: ending up with one big glued up mass of stuff Lay in the inlay strips. In the actual glue up there would be glue between all the strips as well; as on the blank edges that will capture the inlay strips. The strips are setting a bit low in the gap here. I wrap some scrap in packing tape to elevate the inlay strips and get them more centered in the gap. This gives me a better shot at a success should things shift a bit while applying the clamps. I position these heavy duty Quick Grip clamps that I bought just for doing these kinds of things. They have a degree of parallelism in the jaw design that draws things together evenly. I add some clamps that have a more aggressive clamping power. All these clamps are loose at this point. You can see that the upper cauls have been added to the rig. These get slid down so that they restrict horizontal misalignment and then get tightened into position with the jig knobs. This keep the blank halves flat and in plane with each other. Now that the horizontal plane is controlled I add a couple of other clamps to restrict vertical shifting while pressure is applied. These K-bodys are tightened up at this point. A spot check to see that most things are lined up pretty well. Remember that in the real world I have glue all over these things and the clock is ticking. It is relatively low-stress as far as glue ups go as long as things go well during a couple of dry runs. Apply pressure on the quick grip clamps to bring things towards full closure. Everything looking good? Good. Apply pressure using the more powerful clamps and look for good squeeze out EVERYWHERE. I did this as a dry run because although the glue up is not a "hair on fire" activity, you do need to keep things moving. Stopping to take pics would not be an option. Now you will have to excuse me while I go try to so this for real. OK, that went pretty well. The only place I will knock off points is where I forgot to put tape on 3 of the clamp bars where they contacted the glue. It will be funny to watch and see if I catch this on the next three inlays.
    6 points
  28. This is a continuation for the posts I started about this job in "What did you do today" thread. It turned into more of a job than I thought it would be, so I'm just putting it in its own thread. I had expected I could pound the posts back down into postion, but the end two pairs wouldn't move much. I had used the tractor auger when they dropped the lake level in 1986 to do some dam repairs. Ice had lifted all the posts, and the end ones the most. I expect waves got under the ice on the end and lifted them more than the ones close to shore. I think I couldn't pound those end posts because they were leaning enough for the bottoms to be hitting the sides of the 8" holes. I would have packed the dirt around the posts, but with the subsoil here, you can never pack it by hand as hard as it is normally, and even underwater it takes much more than a 20 lb. hammer to drive posts. Today, I pulled a line to see if I could align the outer two sections by the first section. The amount I would have to space out the end post was over the thickness of the posts, so I took up the decking I'd put down on the first section, and moved the outer end of the first section over 1-1/2". You can see how far out the line is in the picture with the scaffold plank. That's why I'm moving the first section over to the left. While I was moving it anyway, I dropped the end down to level. I was at first thinking we would have to take this dock up when we built the Big One on the other side of the point out on the end. You are only allowed to have one dock per "lot". I figured out if I change the property line on the "lot" for the rental house to take in this dock, there is still way more than mimimum land left for the point "lot" to be allowed to build another dock. After thinking about that, I decided to put more time into getting this one nice and straight and level. It will be nice to have one near the beach. I'm not to the point of needing the canoe yet. Today I used a 12" x 24' one man scaffold plank to be able to get out to the end to "pull a line". I screwed a short board across the end, and used a masonry line block to hold that end of the line so I could move it to get it aligned like I want it. I'm using gauge blocks. It took me at least 12 trips back and forth by myself, whereas it would have been quick and easy with a helper. This is a pretty common method for building straight stuff. The lens was fogged up when I took the pic of the line block, but it was already a balancing act on the end of that plank, so I didn't fight it for long. The picture with the scaffold plank in it was before I had moved the first section over to the left. The last picture in this post shows the left band moved to the left 1-1/2" on that end, and dropped down to level. The next working day on it, I'll move the right first section band over (I'll have to cut 1-1/2" out of that post), and move the end of the line over to judge straight off of the newly set first section. The masonry line block allows you to slide it where you want it. The tension in the line holds it in place. The next day I can work on it, I'll do what cutting I need to of the post on the right, and reset the line to take measurements for the tapered pieces I need to make for the right side posts on the end section. I had some dry pieces of treated beams to cut them out of. I'll use the big bandsaw, and post pictures. I also ordered dock bumpers and edging. So hopefully I won't have many more days in this job. I'm only able to work for a couple of hours a day at best. Edits were mostly just to correct grammar. Spax lag screws came, so all these crooked 30d nails will go in deep water. edited later to add a picture of what we started with from the other thread. It's the last picture in this post.
    5 points
  29. I went floating with a rod in hand.
    5 points
  30. Whoa, can’t believe it’s been 4 moths since I posted an update. Since March, we finished the stringing, applied several coats of 50/50 poly/mineral spirits, set the latches, and felted the interior…actually, that all happened in the two weeks leading up to fair check-in. Nothing really notable in the build other than the SOSS hinges are a pain to set, we couldn’t have done it without the PanotRouter. It took us over 4hrs to get the 8 mortises created, but they line up perfectly and work great. I was pretty nervous out felting the interior…turns out carpet tape is the trick. We cut the felt to rough-size, put down our carpet tape, and peeled the tape as we stretched the felt. The felt we used is ‘silver felt’ that’s been specially treated to not tarnish silver(ware)…good enough for a fork and spoon, good enough for a shotgun. Yesterday was fair check-in and we slipped back out to the fair today to see how the kids did. The gun case was Woodworking Grand Champion! P was stoked, I was beaming with pride…then I noticed that his only real competition was his sister…who was Reserve Grand Champion. Oh well. He worked hard to this point and received lots of compliments and comments from people at the fair at lunch, so it was all worth it in the end.
    5 points
  31. Added refrigerant and we are back in business, for now. Evap coil has a leak, but hopefully we can get a new coil before all the refrigerant leaks out again. Maintenance guy at work has a license to buy the refrigerants, so I might get more from him if needed.
    5 points
  32. @Chestnut, I can’t believe you have anything occupying your time that prevents you from posting here. Just checking to see how Megan and Hazel are doing?
    5 points
  33. This inflator arrived today and I've already put it to use: Very well designed and it does a good job.
    5 points
  34. That is a 3/8" radius fluting bit. To avoid burning I run the bit at a reduced speed and cut the flute in steps. The last cut is only about 1/32" deep and done in a fairly quick fluid motion. Hard maple really likes to burn given the chance. I find the juice groove challenging as well. Three reduced speed 1/8" steps on the plunge router and then a very light last pass. Getting around the corners without slowing / stalling long enough to burn gets interesting
    5 points
  35. Thanks all. Here it is oiled. LOML is happy so . . . we all happy
    5 points
  36. I normally don't accept changing horses in the middle of a stream from anyone but, all LOML wanted was some purple heart instead of walnut for the narrow stripe. I bring some purple heart down from the racks, jigsaw a section out of it and resaw it into strips. You can see it next to the walnut here. The OMT worked well for cutting off the bulk of the excess strips last time so I did that again. The process is the same. I am doing a 1/4" slot this time. Remember the inlay strips thickness needs to match the slot width you remove. Just in case it helps someone through the process of glue up . . . After setting up the clamping jig as show earlier in this thread I roll the strips. Then I roll the edges of the blank. I lay the blank halves into the rig, lay in the inlay strips and do the clamping ballet. Next up, routing the juice groove, adding some arcs, profile treatment and the grips.
    5 points
  37. Congrats Meg and Drew. Nutmeg and Hazel - kinda catchy. Larraine and I drove aout 2 hours to Redwood Falls, MN to a county fair today. Lot's of 4 H and animals, some dog dock diving and we wtached the judging for the cherry dessert baking contest and got to sample each dessert. That was breakfast. I really should not have had that full bag of mini donuts 3 hours later but they were soooo good and still hot.
    5 points
  38. First coat of black on tonight Oh and an oh SH$% moment!! Luckily I had made enough for both coats and caught the container with enough to finish this coat On another note I am really starting to appreciate my Fuji Sprayer this is a lot of work, not hard, but i'll probably have 12 to 15 hours in on the 7 coats of finish alone.
    5 points
  39. Hey, and don't forget Tang. On another note closer to home here, there are a number sharpening stones of the shapton type that use technology in their manufacturing process that is connected to some of the failed designs of the heat shield tiles for the space shuttle program. The first time I saw one was back in the early 80's, it was about 3/8 inch thick and 2 1/2" X 4". They were somewhere around 10,000 - 12,000 grit equivalent. The company that made them were coming around to the grocery chains, marketing them to the meat cutters. The called them "The Moon Stone" They didn't go over to well because they cost about a half a days wage at the time. Sometimes something that fails in one field is a success in another.
    5 points
  40. Those are for a boat that I have been wanting to build but have yet to...some day After a light going over with steel wool in preparation for the black I saw a couple of imperfections that were bugging me on the back spindles. While the chair was comfortable it was not as comfortable as the one Greg had in his shop so I got out a scraper and cleaned them up ultimately perfecting the round portion and I am really glad I did as now the chair feels perfect to me. The bad news is it has pushed back the first black coat a day but oh well.
    5 points
  41. Drew, it couldn’t have worked out more perfectly. I picked 1.5” as the width of my tenon and using the 5 mm bit, drilling the outside holes first, the inside third hole cleaned out the mortise nicely. Thanks.
    4 points
  42. While moving things about I came across a jig accessory that I had cut out but never put together. Took a short break from schlepping lumber to finish this thing off. I had to cut the dovetails in the face plate. The intention is to grip things to the face plate and be able to safely move them through operations. I added a couple of slots so it can also be attached to the new sled although that is not the main use. By its nature it could be used as a tenoning jig. I have a cast iron tenon jig that I prefer. However, my cast iron one will not allow me to make angled tenon cuts Or even more unusual cuts. I designed it with the intention of using it at the tablesaw, router table, drill press, and edge sander.
    4 points
  43. Woke up this morning with a dog in labor, but she was finished delivering by 10, so we worked on the dock again. All the outside bands are set, and everything cleaned up. Materials list in the truck for tomorrow. I was going to take a picture, but had been in the water all morning, so laid my phone on the dock. The Sun was out, so it was too hot to operate when I tried to take a picture. I'll run back down there later and take a picture. I had to cut a big chunk out of that end post on the right to get a plumb section to support the band. It looks pretty good now though, even without the last section decked. Picture is making the shoulder cut with the top of the chainsaw bar. It fit perfectly, and no fine tuning of the post was needed after the chainsaw. I had screwed a 2x4 to support that last band at the correct height, and left it long enough to be able to push the band to the side for chainsaw clearance. That 2x4 also supported the scaffold plank in this position. No tools were ever dropped in the lake. I didn't realize SIL had been taking pictures. She had a paddleboard to pick up pieces of wood kicked in the lake. I'll trim the decking boards after they've dried some more. .
    4 points
  44. We were able to get the left side straightened up, and fastened permanently. It was more of a job than it looks like after we've finished with that. My 1-1/2" guesswork on moving that second post out worked out close enough. We didn't have to do anything to the end post, and I only had to do some chainsaw carving on one post. It's within 1/16" of the line using a gauge block, so that should be good enough. You may be able to see the line set with gauge blocks in the second picture. I ended up wading out to the end to pull the nails to drop that band down to level, so we didn't need the canoe. It would have been over the top of the chest waders, but the water felt great! The clouds didn't hold like they said they would, so we quit for the day at 11. For the other side, we'll just measure off the side that we have in place, and the decking will be the easy part.
    4 points
  45. Plunging the domino close together so the slots connect is a good way to get a nice wide mortise for shop made tenon material. I've done that a few times for BB ends (I also do it all the time for all of my projects). I recently made and hefted around a 6'x4' dining table by the bread board ends installed with a domino and there wasn't any issue. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ I wasn't implying using the domino though any floating tenon method would work. I don't really think there is a right answer for your situation. Go with your gut because in 5 years time when you are looking at this you'll forget these issues but you will probably remember where the wood came from. Will it offer some meaning that it came from a tree that you had a hand in milling? Or will you appreciate that the construction was completed without compromise?
    4 points
  46. Today was jointing the shelf boards, and prepping them to glue.
    4 points
  47. 20 yr old son watched someone on YT build a pallet desk shelf and collected a pallet. He asked for a saw….the non powered kind. Sandvik to the rescue. That was a few days ago. Today we approached truing and smoothing a face, and use of winding sticks. I am hands off. It is his project. Difficult to not hover… but still provide support.
    4 points
  48. I'm going to portage it in and out of the back of my pickup, right to the edge of the water.
    4 points
  49. My Dad was a well digger. First real carpentry job was when I was 15. A man starting a campground, where I worked pumping gas on the lake, asked me if I could build 200 picnic tables. I told him I could, but had no idea how. He had a 9" RAS with a bent blade, and some wooden handled hammers. He had a man helping him that he gave me as a helper. I built a form on a sheet of plywood to assemble the ends by. He brought a truckload of 2x6's, and several 50 lb. boxes of nails. I think we built about 10 a day. My best friend and I built telescopes. When we were 16 and 17 we built a 12-1/2" f/6. We built a 12 x 12 house that the roof rolled off of for an observatory in the cow pasture at our house left empty from my Dad's failed dairy farm. My friend went to work for NASA. He was one of the lead scientists on the JWST. When they had trouble with the Hubble, he took our 12-1/2" mirror, that we had built by hand into the lab there. It was better than anything they had. He was put on the team to fix the Hubble. Picture is him and me skiing on the lake, maybe the first people to ever ski here. There were no houses on the lake then. After I graduated from college, there were no jobs around here. I worked at an airport for three months, and decided I didn't want to be an employee or live in a city, so I came back to the lake and talked a man I knew from Boy Scouts into putting a lot in my name so I could borrow money against it to build a house to sell. Lots were 10k then. I told him I'd pay him 15 after the house sold. I did. I told him if I couldn't sell the house, that I'd put the lot back in his name, and he would own the house. He knew I was honest, and could do what I said I could do from Boy Scouts. That was my first spec house. I knew I'd have to figure it out as I went along. I did that for 33 years, taking the Summers off to play on the lake. I got better, and better equipped every year. That first house had a lot of mistakes in it, but sometime last Fall, a guy came by the shop one day, and told me how much he loved that house. I think he was at least the third owner. He is retired and lives there with his Wife.
    4 points
  50. I clamp the blank to a table and clamp the template to it. I shoot for about 1/4" depth so I will have a good bearing surface for the . . . uh . . . bearing at the router table. PPE definitely required for this. I then cut away the waste at the bandsaw. I try to get pretty close to the line on both sides. The less I leave behind the less the router bit will have to deal with. The router bit I want to use was a little grungy. While I let some LA Awesome soak into the gunk I do a little clean up. I use a top / bottom bearing bit so I can always route downhill and avoid tear out. And there you go. Now I have to go find that clamping rig I cobbled together back in 2013. I just used it a couple of years ago, how far could it go? In my defense we are remodeling and objects have gotten shuffled from one area to another with little oversight.
    4 points