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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/23/22 in all areas

  1. This is my bucket list project. It is a French day bed from around 1860, we bought it while I was stationed in Germany in 1979. Solid walnut no veneers. I doubt I could afford the walnut now. My wife's grandmother did the upholstery.
    5 points
  2. What project of photo of a project or idea in your head inspires you? What would you like to be able to make someday. What have you made that you are really glad you made? Here is a photo the inspires me. I think that it appeared in Fine Woodworking circa 2011. Built by Steve Latta. I don't have the skill to pull it off yet but this inspires me to develop. How about you?
    4 points
  3. Got some milling done.
    4 points
  4. Cedar strip canoe from scratch. I'm greatly debating making it from puloweana though. I have time to decide.
    3 points
  5. While the some finish and glue are drying I am going to babble for a minute-------------- I am finally getting it into my thick head that using a ruler to transfer dimensions or to layout joints is not the best way to go. More and more I am using the pieces themelves or marking gauges or dividers in my layout work and the resulting fit is getting better the more I do it. I am using story sticks now as well. I know that there are a lot more "tricks" out there to help improve my layout skills. I just keep looking. Every video I watch I look for that one brief shot that shows how the builder got the fit so perfect. It is so satisfying when the fit is dead on. Most of you already knew this.
    2 points
  6. Gerstner style machinist tool box. They look simple enough on the surface but there are things that I think will be challenging to figure out. One is building them so they are actually secure when they are locked. I haven't decided on which layout but one of the two pictured.
    2 points
  7. I use dividers all the time, and try to stick to whole number fractions for parts. The whole number fractions don't often result in any kind of even measurement. I'll be showing one use of dividers in the handrail thread when I get to that part.
    2 points
  8. I find myself using a dble square and marking knife when my marking gauges are already set for something else. Maybe I need a couple more marking gauges. I have also found that having a small piece of hardwood exactly 1/4" thick (Pick your dimension) to make a mark exactly 1/4" from another mark works very well. I should make a set of these pieces of varying thicknesses to have them handy.
    2 points
  9. I think you got ash, Coop. I've seen maple with such visible grain lines, as it isn't a 'ring porous' species. But that looks different from the ash around my neck of the woods, so I can't say for sure.
    2 points
  10. That is a laudible goal. I had to goole drum table - great curved surface and veneering project.
    1 point
  11. A large Duncan Phyfe drum table and a Thomas Seymour tall case clock.
    1 point
  12. I noticed the same thing. I guess people might think it's needless and boring in a video? It's the same with relative dimensioning. Marc is the only one I've run across who even mentions it. I'm still waiting to run into these subject while I'm going through the entire run of FWW magazine. Story sticks seem to be the ticket.
    1 point
  13. I have not really used dividers that often but they seem like a great tool to get even spacing. I could use 4 or 5 marking gauges though. I really like using them for layout and getting consistent results. I know sliding rules like double squares can be helpful but the knife mark just seems better. I've started using knife lines for drilling holes as the point of a drill bit drops nicely into the intersection of 2 knife lines.
    1 point
  14. When i first bought the planer i was reclaiming hardrock maple dunage. It seemed like every 3rd board the blades would chip, i went to my favorite candy store in Edmonton and got some good german made blades, they said they would last 3 times longer, they where correct, they chipped after about the 9th board. I went back and ordered the Byrd Shelix and have not been disapointed since. My laguna planer has them as well they call it shear teck i believe, in 3 years i have turned them twice. I do not mind paying more for quailty.
    1 point
  15. This happened to me recently. Because the handles seem to be forever out of stock, I reattached the broken one with 2-part epoxy and it's held up remarkably well.
    1 point
  16. No the color really only means something to some saw mills some of the time. IIRC from the lumber industry podcast different mills use different colors for various reasons. Some mills all use the same color. I'd bet a lot of money that's ash. Not sure which ash, my gut guess is green, but for me it can be hard to differentiate between the different ash species through pictures.
    1 point
  17. Usually. The only reason I could see that would result in an uneven thickness is if the chain was sharpened with a bad set to one side or drastic user error. As long as the chain is well sharpened it's pretty east to get a uniform thickness.
    1 point
  18. Been a while since I did a project journal and thought I would do one to capture my next two projects. Going to try and make the outdoor sitting bench from TWW site and the bit storage cabinet from TWW site. I decided to do both at once as when I get everything out to mill the lumber, cut parts, and make the joints, it seems easier and faster to do more than one thing at a time to save time on setting up the tools. I can use both of these projects around the house and thought they looked like some good skill builders that were not overly complex. Sounds like a double win to me. Going to do the benches in cypress and maybe the cabinet in cherry as I have some off-cuts around that will work perfectly.
    1 point
  19. wax on wax off..... nice looking mallet
    1 point
  20. After spending all day moving rubber mats and shelving around the shop I wanted a quick win. So I finally got around to replacing my old carvers mallet. Simple chunk of white oak, finished in the Miyagi Method.
    1 point
  21. Just ordered the sawstop stand alone cast iron table. The display model was fantastic, should be a goid table for ever i hope
    1 point
  22. Thanks bud. I have never worked with maple and am wondering if I really got it? I did buy some figured soft maple from a reliable source, @Spanky, but it is a figured/tiger maple and don’t know if that is a good comparison. The face grain are the two with the red lines. I have worked with pecan and hickory both and this is not hear as dense as those two. The face grain is what concerns me as I didn’t expect it to look like this. The ends are painted blue. Is there a universal color for paint colors for different woods?
    1 point
  23. I have no aspirations nor skill to build anything close to what you pictured. I just go from day to day for a project that may pop up and hopefully that project will expand my level of comfort.
    1 point
  24. @Ronn W, I've seen your work posted here. There is no doubt in my mind that you could build that piece. As for a 'dream build', I don't really have one. I like to tinker, and to take on a challenge when the motivation is right, but I haven't been all that motivated of late.
    1 point
  25. Pretty simple, Ronn...I just want to build a full size kitchen table, solid 2" oak from the slabs I have here at home, with 2" legs of some nice design. All joined with mortise and tenon joinery. The way my back has been lately, I don't think I could handle the build without my overhead hoist. We don't have enough room for one, and I don't have any friends that are looking for one. So, unless I find a buyer, it might just be a pipe dream...
    1 point
  26. You are dealing with end grain, and cross-grain conflicts, the glue will do very little to keep the joint together. A well fitting joint will suffice if the legs are made with stable material lacking in twist or bow.
    1 point
  27. Hammer, You got me thinking about my own leg dado problem. I kept trying to think of a way to do it quickly with power tools but I realized that I was probably going to spend more time thinking an making jigs that it would take to just do it. (thanks Joe). So here's what I came up with. The bulk of the removal of the corner of the shelf was done on the table saw. The rest is hand saw, router plane and chisel work. I haven't yet decided if I am going to glue the joints. I could let them float. I could glue them; this the bottom shelf and the the next one is 11" up - just let the legs flex.
    1 point
  28. And we never see tomatoes like that even in September.
    1 point
  29. After a couple of days of having to do puppy, and 106 year old Mother stuff, I was able to get back to this today. I have the old jointer working smoother than a new one. I cleaned everything out completely, and oiled all the bearings. I thought surely some of these pieces would have moved a little bit after sitting for several days, but none did. It looks like I'm going to be able to get every piece I need out of them, with not a bit left over. One edge of all pieces was straightened. I always get a kick out of people saying that the length of the piece straightened is limited by the length of the jointer. I've straightened more than a few 2x12x16's with a couple of helpers. These 2x3-1/2x12's were about the limit for being by myself though. It was all I wanted to do to hold down the tail end of these pieces. A dust collector is missed, but a jointer or planer are not too bad for outside. A cordless leafblower between pieces was a big help. A few of them needed flattening on one side, so the other side, like the one shown in the picture, still has to visit the planer. 89 and very high humidity, so today is done. The Sun comes in that door after lunch, so the next step will wait. That brick ranch house in the background is the rental house. It's right here where all our other stuff is.
    1 point
  30. Hey, you guys forgot the CBN wheels! Ut-oh, more to spend.
    1 point
  31. I built this because I was the worst at sharpening turning tools. I love the grinder and the Wolverine grinding system it has upped my game no doubt. I made the station on casters I also have my work sharp and my other grinder all hooked up and one plug powers up all devices.
    1 point
  32. While trying (and failing) to sharpen my lathe tools on a belt grinder again, I decided to admit defeat. Now I need to build a grinding/sanding sstation. Ontop of everything else in the shop.
    1 point