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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/11/21 in all areas

  1. I put a game camera out to try and figure out what was leaving piles of poo in my tree row. It may be a racoon or it may also be this guy. The time and date got messed up. This is right around 1am. It's interesting to catch an urban coyote on camera. I knew they were in the area but never realized they were literally in my back yard.
    2 points
  2. Three zones. Outlets in the ceiling for hanging 'shop lites'. Current units are LED, 4000k. They will hang just below DC ducting to avoid shadows. This is a change from years of 6500k T-8 lamps that served me well. The upside to the 6500k is the bright white light, minimal eye fatigue, great visibility. The downside is that I had to keep a variety of other lamps available to get a better color read when selecting material and finishing. When it was time for new lamps I bought a range of CRI and Lumen value lamps to test. The 4000k seems to be the best balance for me. Four rows of four
    2 points
  3. I think this skill is the biggest thing that differentiates fine woodworking from woodworking.
    2 points
  4. When your done head my way. I'd like to add a zone for watering some plants on my hill. I have some nice figured cherry for payment... .
    1 point
  5. I may have misunderstood your issue. I thought you were asking about the limits of travel being the reason for doing the job in two parts, not supporting the work while machining. I've mortised large entry doors on mine by simply using a roller stand to support the work. It's rare that I need to do anything that large on the PR, so I don't see the need to build any kind of permanent table around it. It would be in the way most of the time, IMO.
    1 point
  6. @sreilly I think your method should work just fine. That's probably how i would approach it. Another option would be to cut to the max width of the standard table width, then slide the full 19 1/12" piece over and use the "first cut" position of the bit indexing against the last tail piece that was cut.
    1 point
  7. Check the solenoid to see if it is operating when the zone is turned on. If so disassemble the valve and check the diaphragm for a tear, and check that there is not sediment(rocks and sand) in the valve.
    1 point
  8. Is this on city water? If so, the valve is likely stuck open. Depending on the age and style, you can pull the core and check the electronics.
    1 point
  9. See if you have power to the valve when it’s suppose to be off. If not, it sounds like a stuck in the open position valve. If not, do you have an extra zone in your control box to switch it to?
    1 point
  10. I almost cannot believe it...in the real home stretch. Just need to drill the holes for the dowel safety pins; final sanding with 220; and then finish with some danish oil. Sure there were a few bumps along the way and things in the project that could be improved, but overall I am pretty happy for my first build that was not as much of a DYI style project. There is some truth in “just build something” as I think I was holding myself back by thinking it would be too hard or I would just mess up. Plus I am a firm believer in my Uncles Two Day Rule. When doing any project if you mess something
    1 point
  11. And a shadow of someone holding a phone.
    1 point